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5

Not Cotton Related: Does cotton really kill? Any active base layer will suffice as long as it is not cotton. Cotton is great for keeping you cool, but terrible for wicking moisture and keeping you warm. The classic "Union Suit" that your suit is modelled after was developed as, and is still worn by some as underwear, so you could use your suit as your ...


5

When you are facing a serious sweating problem, maybe your overall setup is too warm. What layers/jackets do you wear above the one-suite-fleece? I am thinking of a very thin layer which is highly breathable and will just be a shelter against the elements (wind, rain/snow) like e.g. the Gore Active Shell. Still, sweating to some degree is pretty normal. ...


3

When I was in central Alaska, courtesy of Uncle Sam, we wore vapor barrier boots. They are great for extremely low temperatures, but of you are heavily exerting in milder weather* (down to -23C/-10F range), your socks would get downright soggy. Some soldiers did put anti-perspirant on their feet to help with cold and trench foot symptoms. If plastic ...


5

When to use it: An vapour barrier is used when the temperature is very cold and when a wet down-suit/sleeping bag, clothes or shoes can cause serious hypothermia. It's also used if you can't dry your stuff because of no sun, cold temperature or bad weather, so everything stays dry at least from the inside. Thinking behind this: When the isolation layers get ...


5

Could the use of anti-perspirant give benefit in extreme cold climate where sweating can be a significant problem. TL;DR answer: Unlikely. The issue is the sheer amount of water your body will secrete during physical exercise. It would be impossible for anti persperant to prevent this amount of moisture. To clarify Anti-perspirants work by: ...


0

Cotton does not kill, hypothermia does, It just happens to be a lot easier to get hypothermia when you wear cotton, not because it doesn't insulate you as well as other materials, it just doesn't insulate you as well when it is wet. One thing that I think a lot of people don't know is that during the early expeditions in the himalayas, people wore cotton ...


18

They are basically measures for the quality of the down fill. The 90/10 part refers to the mixture of down and feathers. As down contains nearly no rigid structure, one adds some amount of feathers to give the whole filling some more stability. The example of 90/10 means 90% down, 10% feathers and seems to be quite a typical mixture. I'm not sure about the ...


2

I know some people (mostly female) who wear cotton on winter hikes, but they claim they don't sweat (and they drink very little, which makes that plausible). But I sweat a lot, and if you sweat a lot, in winter it's very important to wear breathing clothes. And with breathing clothes is so, that one non-breathing layer breaks the whole thing. Cotton likes ...


4

I'm pretty sure this concept originated with search and rescue teams, who noticed a correlation between what the lost hiker was wearing, and whether the result of the search was a 'rescue' or a 'recovery'. I strongly believe this to be true, and I tried to find good data online, but no luck yet. If somebody can find a proper, double-blinded study of the ...


5

This depends on the actual type of clothing and mostly on the wind speed. The wind evaporates moisture from the body. Since evaporation is a cooling process and absorbs latent heat away from the body, the person feels colder. Skin always has moisture on it. Just like a tree transpires, the human body is constantly having water evaporated from it. Wind ...


4

As always the answer differs depending on application, the experimental summary above tells us what happens very well while offering a conclusion that is only subjectively useful. In my own experience cotton is comfortable, inexpensive and can be obtained in the right size, but should not be used exclusively when traveling outdoors any significant distance ...


26

Here is an article that quantifies the heat loss effects of cotton, polyester and polypropylene: Rossi et al., Dry and Wet Heat Transfer Through Clothing Dependent on the Clothing Properties Under Cold Conditions, International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics (JOSE) 2008, Vol. 14, No. 1, 69–76. Experimental Summary Here is a rough summary ...


6

There is this informal study that suggests there isn't much difference between wet gear of any fabric. http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2012/11/cotton-vs-wool-insulation.html But it misses the point entirely. It's not getting wet that kills, it's how long it takes you to get dry afterwards that kills. A much better test would be to keep the water at a ...


17

Yes, there have been studies on how much various fabrics insulate when wet and dry. I remember Dr Murray Hamlet mentioning these statistics in one of his lectures on outdoor survival in the cold. It's been a long time, but I think cotton looses something like 80% of its insulating properties when wet. I may be off on the exact number, but I definitely ...


1

Also, On top of it all.. someone has to pay for advertisements as well. The more hype a company puts out, they need to make that money back which then raises there price of items. That's why Costco can sell things so cheap as well as purchasing so many at a time which then reduces the overall price for you. On top of that, you pay a membership fee at Costco ...


3

I think your basis for this question is a bit out of skew with the myself more at risk clause. The difference between truly top end Merino Wool and lesser quality wool is the micron (µm) being used. The really good quality stuff, say, Icebreaker, uses the highest quality micron which results in a warmer garment that is able to handle ‘peripheral temperature ...



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