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18

Gloves or Mittens? All things being equal (fabrics, thickness, and insulation), mittens are warmer than gloves. Mitts trap body heat by keeping your fingers together and reducing evaporative heat loss. In frigid temperatures, a layered mitt system is the best choice for warmth. Layers dry faster than one heavily insulated piece, and let you swap out wet ...


13

This is simply a question of the increased surface area of gloves which will therefore increase temperature (heat flux) exchange. Similar reason why foxes have bigger ears as closer they are located to the equator, to increase heat flux and in this case lower the body temperature of the fox. In case of your gloves this isn't beneficial for you in case of ...


11

As with clothes you were wearing while you climbed, the liner boots are damp - if not wet from the days activity. Energy is required to evaporate the moisture - this cools you down, including your feet. You get cold from it very easily. Also as most people will feel cold if they have cold feet, so you will feel cold even if you are actually warm enough. In ...


10

As other people have mentioned mittens are warmer in almost all circumstances, a large part of this is that your entire hand is keeping the inside warm rather than each finger trying to warm itself individually. Where they fall down is when you need to take your hand out of the mitts, everything from taking photos to having something to eat becomes a chore ...


10

35° is 35°, whether in your car, in your pack, or in your refrigerator back home. However, handling raw meat otherwise is very different outdoors than at home. Personally, I think bringing raw meat into the wilderness is a bad idea. There are plenty of other foods that give you the same or better nutrition, don't require as careful handling, weigh ...


9

You want to leave enough room at the entrance for airflow. If the entrance is totally blocked you could possibly suffocate on the CO2 you breathe out. In addition to the entrance, keep an eye on the air exit at the top so it doesn't get blocked. You can heat the inside significantly with just a candle.


9

How much water you need depends on how big you are, how fit you are, where you are and what you're doing. For example, on Mount Everest, the average person needs to drink 4-5L of water each day just so that their body can function properly. You lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. If you're a big guy that's out of shape, ...


8

This seems a bit low to me, but there are lots of other factors to consider. The main ones are temperature and exertion/walking speed. Different people also definitely need different amounts of water. One of my friends was nicknamed desert-man as he drank approximately 4x as much as everyone else. If you are in the UK or a similarly cool climate, then 100ml ...


7

Different gasses have different boiling points. Under boiling point the gas is liquid and don't have enough pressure to come out from the canister (if used in upright). The boiling points of usual gasses used in (camping) gas stoves are: Propane: −42.25 to −42.04 °C Butane: −1 to 1 °C Iso-butane: −13 to −9 °C source Wikipedia: Propane, butane and ...


7

The variety used by pipe fitters working the oil fields in the Great White North: You sound like you're working on the oil rigs, which explains why the pointer finger on your gloves keeps blowing out. Ski gloves and climbing gloves aren't going to take the abuse of turning pipe all day, what you need is a sturdy pair of leather gloves with a reinforced ...


7

The standard expedition stove for extreme conditions would be an MSR XGK. You will likely want to bring a pair of them, along with a repair kit, on the assumption that due to the cold or poor quality fuel you'll break a pump or need to make other repairs. Now, you may be thinking "what are all those people doing with canister stoves on ...


5

Could the use of anti-perspirant give benefit in extreme cold climate where sweating can be a significant problem. TL;DR answer: Unlikely. The issue is the sheer amount of water your body will secrete during physical exercise. It would be impossible for anti persperant to prevent this amount of moisture. To clarify Anti-perspirants work by: ...


5

I found this interesting article on the topic of cold weather and hydration. http://www.unh.edu/news/news_releases/2005/january/sk_050128cold.html In cold weather you lose significant moisture just by breathing the dry air. Even in 100% humidity ( very rare in winter) the cold air can suck moisture from your lungs since it warms up in the lungs and can ...


5

No, 100 ml per hour is way too little in many circumstances. That would mean only 1 l over a 10 hour hike. Anyone that's been on a 10 hour hike, even not in particularly hot or dry weather, can tell you that's not nearly enough. For hiking in hot desert conditions, 1 l per hour (10 times your suggestion) is more like it. I have done significant hiking in ...


5

This depends on the actual type of clothing and mostly on the wind speed. The wind evaporates moisture from the body. Since evaporation is a cooling process and absorbs latent heat away from the body, the person feels colder. Skin always has moisture on it. Just like a tree transpires, the human body is constantly having water evaporated from it. Wind ...


5

Mittens are normally warmer than gloves. On The most expeditions (high mountains or very cold temperature) the most people wear thick down/synthetic mittens, because they're warmer than gloves. The blood flow in one finger is not that much and so it helps if all fingers are on one big mitten. And it's also not possible and practical in use to produce very ...


5

Buy an Overbag. Use the Overbag when it's too warm for your down bag Use the down bag at and around -15C Use the Overbag and Down Bag together when it's colder than -15C AND if you want to get real fancy get a Vapour Barrier Liner and use all three together for expeditions and temps below -30C. You now have all your bases covered! This is much more ...


4

I would add that I did Jiri to EBC in Feb 1992 (the coldest time of year?) and found it to be cold (4 season sleeping bag) but manageable. I am just re-reading my diary from the time - and the noticeable thing is that the cold is mentioned quite a lot - but my 'whining about the cold' is ALWAYS related to wind. So make sure you have windproof gear handy to ...


4

There is a definite danger of hypothermia depending upon the "type" of tent you choose to use. Eskimos live in -70F environments from one day to the next, so it is doable certainly. Native Americans as cited above have tents to provide for living in environments that commonly get to -50F (by keeping a fire burning inside the tent). A TeePee isn't what I ...


4

Unfortunately you are limited in your options: use a mat under you and the sleeping bag as a blanket. This will be a lot colder, though buy another bag, perhaps rated to -5 as an alternative. If you have the carrying capacity, it can be simpler to have a lighter sleeping bag plus blankets, so you can adjust the temperature to suit. Or you could go for a ...


3

When meteorologists tell you the temperature, likely they mean the temperature more than 1m off the ground in a shaded place (for example in a Stevenson screen). Anything sunlit is likely to be warmer. The ground is likely to be different (warmer or cooler depending what else is going on). You can't assume that just because the weather report for the region ...


3

When I was in central Alaska, courtesy of Uncle Sam, we wore vapor barrier boots. They are great for extremely low temperatures, but of you are heavily exerting in milder weather* (down to -23C/-10F range), your socks would get downright soggy. Some soldiers did put anti-perspirant on their feet to help with cold and trench foot symptoms. If plastic ...


3

To answer the sleeping bag question: Snow shelters drip. Constantly. You can deal with some of the drips by placing your ungloved finger on the drip and then moving down to the bottom of the wall. The heat of your finger melts a tiny channel and encourages the drip to follow it. Still, you will get damp, so the best approach is either to have a ...


3

Several people have already mentioned getting special gloves that have "flippable" finger tips, but no one has specifically mentioned sensory gloves which can be a little bit different than gloves that just flip their tips. In addition to flip-tips they also have a little hole that you can touch through, so you don't actually have to take your finger tip all ...


2

Keep the bag Warm not your clothes! Both clothes and sleeping bags are insulators, the problem with wearing too many clothes in your sleeping bag is that you will actually insulate yourself independent of the bag, as a result, your bag won't get warm or it will take a long time to warm up. You will eventually have issues with moisture control, as your bag ...


1

You're sleeping bag only works if you can get it warm. If you wear too many clothes in your sleeping bag, you're not going to fill the loft of your expensive down mummy with cozy warm body heat. This is what can happen if you're wearing your liners in bed, the bag around your feet doesn't warm up. I think whether or not you get cold toes depends a lot on ...


1

Most ski gloves will have a waterproof/breathable layer (Gore-Tex or something similar, they should be labelled to say what it is). In my experience new gloves also seem to have a water repellant on the fabric to help water drops fall off before they get to the Gore-Tex. This surface water repellant will wear away and could be refreshed with various spray-on ...


1

Yes you can. Degrees are degrees no matter if in a fridge or outside of it. And some less degrees won't hurt to food preservation (while some extra ones of course could). If you need to carry the food in a backpack for a long time remember that the body radiates warmth, so take that into account, and don't keep the food close to your back in the rucksack. ...


1

Some of these answers have the basics, and new posts are redundant, others miss things or aren't true. I've been plenty warm in 0° with a mummy bag from KMart. The trick is knowing how to use what gear you have. Always have a ground layer to prevent conduction. Go to bed warm, hydrated, and fed. Don't bother with a tent, in general. You'll most likely ...


1

Piece of cake. I was working for St. John's Cathedral Boys' School in the late 70's. The school had a winter program that included week long dog sled expeditions. We had the odd case of frostbite, but nothing serious. On a bet, I slept under a tarp for a year. It wasn't a fancy setup. I started in the fall, and threw a tarp over a large willow bush, ...



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