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13

Drinking alcohol in a blizzard with potential for whiteout conditions is reckless, irresponsible, and possibly dangerous. Alcohol causes your blood vessels to dilate, which leads to an increased rate of heat loss. A much better source of quick energy would be a food with simple carbohydrates.


11

Caveat: Heading out into a blizzard seems an easy way to get killed. Personally I'd only do it in dire situations. Regarding your layers: Cotton stores about 27x it's weight in water. This makes it comfortable indoors or in hot weather, but it also means it will act like a swamp cooler once you're no longer throwing off enough heat to keep it warm. ...


10

Check out the website http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/wildcond.htm As of March 3, 2016, the website said this about General Conditions under the heading Wilderness Conditions Be prepared for winter conditions throughout the park. The current snowpack is about 85 - 100% of average for this time of year, depending on location, a significant ...


10

Before the climb As @ShemSeger suggests, most of the work is to be done before the climb itself. You need to stay warm belaying your partner and waiting to climb yourself - if your hands and feet are cold beforehand, it will be hard to warm them up when they are in contact with cold stone. What you can do is: Keep your core warm by wearing warm clothes - ...


10

So at 5C, with 60Kmh winds, that gives you a feeling of about -2C See here. Not zero, If the air temperature gets to 0C then there's a potential for about -9C. You want to be aiming for a laying system so you can adjust your core temperature with movement, if you stop you'll want something to keep you warm. I'm not sure you have anything like that in that ...


8

Pneumonia is not what you have to be worried about in this situation. It is a serious pathologic condition of the lungs commonly (but not exclusively) cause by viral or bacterial infection. Unless you were previously infected it is not likely to catch anything away from civilization. There is a widespread notion of a relation between being cold and catching ...


7

Warm Your Core! One thing all climbers have in common, is a big poofy down jacket. Your fingers are only going to be as warm as your core is, so keep your core warm, and that nice warm blood will circulate to your fingers. Only take your jacket off when it's your turn to climb. For extra warmth, drink hot chocolate while you're wearing your poofy jacket ...


7

Scandinavia is a good option, the more north you go the better. For me the nature there is more remote, more 'raw' compared to the Alps. So I would think it's comparable with Canada (although I've never been to those regions). If you can choose when to go, why not go during winter time. You can add late autumn and early spring too. In this timespan you ...


6

These look like common garden spiders, which range from tiny to about the size of a 50 pence piece, and come in colours from yellow through to green. They're common to see between May and November but you can see them later in the year, potentially. However this maybe another species, but these ones are really common. Now usually these spiders will find ...


5

I am presuming this is not a hypothetical survival situation and it can be planned for. I used to regularly walked in wet boots for days, often in near (although rarely below) 0 degree temperatures, although pass hopping we could spend most of a day above the snow line with wet boots. A typical week to 10 day trip where I live you will cross a river ...


4

Put Heat Warmers in your climbing shoes and in your gloves, put a big puffy on. Jumping jacks, lots of jumping jacks, get your heart rate up and get your blood flowing and warmed up. Climb, the first climb is always the worst! Keep a heat pack in your chalk bag. You'll freeze on the wall but when you get down you'll be hot! Immediately throw on your ...


4

The water will either absorb into the sleeping bag materials, and or evaporate, or absorb then evaporate. The rate of evaporation is determined by the humidity inside the sleeping bag, and this is determined by the rate water vapor escapes into the outside air. The latent heat of evaporation of water is around 2264 kilo Joule/Kilogram (629 WH/Kilogram.) - ...


4

I would add an extra insulation layer for the morning. A light down or synthetic jacket would help you warm up when you get out of bed. Don't wear cotton pants. Not only will they keep you cold if they get wet, they will never dry, and will be very uncomfortable. When it does not rain, you'd want your fleece to be wind-stopper, or have a windproof jacket ...


4

In humans not a lot. There are significant differences between blubber and fat. Though blubber is mostly made of fat it has very different composition to human fat. An animal with blubber also uses it in very different ways to the way a human uses fat. Fat in a human is an energy source, not insulation: (blubber)... can comprise up to 50% of the body ...


3

There are many good answers here, there are also several warnings about the advisability of your journey. One of the more important things to take (that seems to have been overlooked) is your ID, drivers license, dog tags (if you were in the military). As a consideration for others it is important to make it easier for them to identify your body if/when it ...


3

The advantage of layering is that it is versatile so for example if you have a base layer an insulating layer and a shell layer you can wear only the base layer in hot weather, base layer plus shell layer in mild but wet weather, base layer plus mid layer in cold dry weather or all of the above in extreme weather. Soft shell jackets and lofted down or ...


3

I just browsed the meta site, and am encouraged to add an answer. I agree with the above answers and comments, especially (1) don't wear cotton pants; (2) carry spare socks and mitts; (3) poly is lighter and warmer than wool when wet; (4) your clothing is on the light side; consider the additions suggested. I'd ADD: a neck gaiter. This is a fleece tube ...


2

48 hours is very definitively too long for your feet to be wet, even regardless of temperature. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immersion_foot_syndromes From the CDC article "Injury occurs because wet feet lose heat 25-times faster than dry feet. Therefore, to prevent heat loss, the body constricts blood vessels to shut down circulation in the feet. Skin ...


2

Four season tents should be good for 4 seasons. Winter tents are good for winter. I don't think a tent that is a winter tent can accurately be called a 4 season tent because it's not. Not expert analysis just common sense. What makes a good 4 season tent is the ability to withstand cold and heat. Huge mesh panels on the inner tent for when it's hot that ...


2

A couple of additional points which I think have not yet got the attention they deserve. Time is of the essence. I've once seen a report that stated that the average swimmer can make it about 50 meters max in 4°C water before drowning. That is not a lot! Meaning, that if the person in distress cannot hold on to something which helps them stay afloat you ...


2

If you burry your bottle in snow it should be less likely to freeze. The snow is a great insulator and burying the bottle completely should keep the heat from escaping. Essentially you are making a quinsy for you bottle (but much less effort!).


2

We have experience with ice accumulating on our tent, but we just bang it off manually. We've never had to deal with a tent encased in strong ice. Usually we'll reposition the pegs and ties because the tent has slumped from the moisture and then ice, but we just manually knock any of that ice off too. We haven't had to deal with more than a day or two ...


2

tl;dr: concrete advice under the horizontal line Agreeing with the other answers, alcohol is best left for later because it can disorientate you. And among strength, endurance, body type, environment awareness, wisdom - the last is by far the most important when surviving. A month ago I was the closest in my life to calling Mountain Rescue (thanks god, ...


1

It's a simple calculus: weigh the inconvenience of carrying some extra layers (weight and bulk) vs. the danger of being under prepared. Keep in mind that weather forecasts are only advisory, and conditions can change (sometimes for the worse). When I hike in the mountains (White Mountains, New Hampshire) or backcountry ski, I always err on the side of ...


1

The first thing is to think very hard about whether you really need to cross it, in most circumstances the answer will be NO so there needs to be a strong reason to do so. DO NOT cross a river just because you are travelling in a straight line and the river is in the way. A river is a good source of water and, food and materials and they are an excellent ...



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