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21

One thing you can look into are long-legged thermal underwear - this wouldn't effect how you look on the outside as they go under your clothes and create an insulating layer to help keep you warm. Women can get away with this in everyday life with a nice pair of tights. So for city life, as you stated, this should mean no difference in your every day ...


10

Long thick socks will help in 2 ways -- they'll reduce heat loss through your feet/lower calves and reduce draughts up your legs. Even 2 pairs of normal socks would be better than nothing. There are special thermal socks (sold as heat-holders for example) but they may not fit in your shoes. This could be regarded as in addition to thermal underwear. If ...


9

Before the climb As @ShemSeger suggests, most of the work is to be done before the climb itself. You need to stay warm belaying your partner and waiting to climb yourself - if your hands and feet are cold beforehand, it will be hard to warm them up when they are in contact with cold stone. What you can do is: Keep your core warm by wearing warm clothes - ...


7

I did a lot of swimming in NW Ontario when I was a kid, and I've spent more time swimming in lakes and rivers than I have in swimming pools. I find the phrasing of this question curious, because I've never heard any one use the words "wild swimming" nor have I ever considered swimming in a mountain lake or a river "wild". None the less, there are some ...


6

EDIT: Please also read the other answer, which tells you why wrong (well perhaps not for 100% of the cases=) This is just my experience: I would warm up if I felt cold and had the opportunity to do so. Sure, slowly getting cold again is not comfortable, but staying cold for an even longer time is worse. Another effect that I noticed is that warming up ...


6

Warm Your Core! One thing all climbers have in common, is a big poofy down jacket. Your fingers are only going to be as warm as your core is, so keep your core warm, and that nice warm blood will circulate to your fingers. Only take your jacket off when it's your turn to climb. For extra warmth, drink hot chocolate while you're wearing your poofy jacket ...


6

Your criteria: a full day with a decent chunk of inactivity, cold but not frigid, with some precipitation. Normally when active outdoors in such weather I wear softshell pants (schoeller-type fabrics, such as Arc'teryx Gamma LT or Marmot Scree pants) and a lightweight or silkweight baselayer. This provides wind and water resistance, won't make me overheat, ...


6

Another option is flannel-lined jeans. I find them more comfortable and simple than thermal underwear, and they are very warm in the winter. You also have the option of adding the thermal underwear if you are still too cold. What kind to get is a matter of personal preference, and what kind of jeans you would typically wear. Amazon lists a selection of many ...


5

You could try wearing a pair of sweats under your pants. I've done that before, and was quite warm, and comfortable. Pajamas are also an option.


4

The way to get started is to swim in areas that are marked as generally safe. These will typically be a sandy beach on the shores of a small lake. Provincial Parks generally have one of these with float lines marking the "safe" areas. As you can see, you're free to swim outside the lines if you want to. From http://www.ontarioparks.com/park/mikisew There ...


4

Put Heat Warmers in your climbing shoes and in your gloves, put a big puffy on. Jumping jacks, lots of jumping jacks, get your heart rate up and get your blood flowing and warmed up. Climb, the first climb is always the worst! Keep a heat pack in your chalk bag. You'll freeze on the wall but when you get down you'll be hot! Immediately throw on your ...


3

I think part of what is missing in your question and the answer by flawr is core body temperature. When you first get cold your body automatically shunts blood away from the surface of your skin to decrease heat loss. As you get colder your core body temperature falls (you could think of it like the cold sinking in, but that is not literally true). When ...


3

You could wear clothes that cover up your chest portion and if you cover up chest portion then it will be warm.Chest is the most sensitive part to sense cold.So cover up your chest as much as possible.Apart from this you can wear socks that are not made up of cotton but maybe wool or any other.Then for body warner or sweater or thick jacket and thermal inner ...


2

I live in an area where temperatures of -20C or colder is a normal winter day, and can go down to -40C at times. A good pair of long underwear and a pair of flannel lines jeans sounds like it would be perfect for you. I'm not sure if Cabelas delivers to Europe, but they have a great online selection of these and other cold weather items, and are a big "go ...


2

Canadian glacier lake swimmer here - You can train your body to overcome the cold shock response. It's a matter of mind over body, yes your body responds to the sudden shock of diving into cold water, but the trick to overcoming it is to relax, slow your brain down, and focus on controlling your breathing. The best way to do this minimize your movements, ...


1

You can get thermal reflective liners for your boots - I find that keeping my feet warm usually helps with keeping my legs warm as heat tends to be lost through extremities (Feet, Hands, Head so socks, gloves and hats are always the best available). Thermal tights work wonders as well under trousers - they may not look brilliant but they do the job. You may ...


1

Well, when you touch something very cold, it can be like touching something hot. You get the same reaction to jerk away from it quickly. I believe Cold Shock is essentially the same thing, except you're either immersed or covered in the cold water, so your brain goes into a state of panic as it's trying to get away from the water covering you - Obviously not ...



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