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6

Yes, you should seek medical expertise. From healthcentral.com: When the skin has thawed and rewarming is complete, cover the damaged skin with bandages and warm clothing. Contact your doctor or go to an emergency room.


6

The phenomenon name is cold diuresis. From thefreedictionary.com: [cold diuresis] occurs in hypothermia as a result of peripheral vasoconstriction, hyperglycemia and decreased renal tubular absorption. You can easily find articles and papers on the subject on the Internet.


5

The key to cold weather clothing is viewing it as a system. The base layer of the system wicks moisture from the body and provides a small amount of insulation. The middle layer(s) of the system provide warmth and wind protection. The outer layer provides protection from the elements. That being said, a proven system for the temperature range you're ...


3

You actually don't need to go outdoors to get struck by Hypothermia. But you can suffer from it on a trek where you don't have a proper campsite, camping equipment, or good clothing and bedding. From http://www.globalaging.org/health/us/hypothermia.htm The most important step in treating hypothermia is to make and then keep a person warm and dry. ...


3

I don't have any good references for calorie expenditure, given that there are so many variables, so I will leave that to someone with a proper reference. In my personal experience in cold-weather, back country hiking and camping, the best time to wash is not at the end of a day's exertion when you are prone to getting chilled, but rather prior to starting ...


2

According to this article, Avijit Datta and Michael Tipton: Respiratory responses to cold water immersion: neural pathways, interactions, and clinical consequences awake and asleep, A fall in skin temperature elicits a powerful cardiorespiratory response, termed “cold shock,” comprising an initial gasp, hypertension, and hyperventilation despite a ...


2

When we get cold vasoconstriction occurs. This prevents the blood at the extremities being subject to heat conduction away from the body. This is not an adaption, this is a reaction. The body emits heat all the time because the body working and but wants to remain at constant temperature. If the ambient temperature is such that we can lose this heat, we ...


1

Just to add to PPL's answer. The UK National Health Service has good practical advice on this also. It's available here. But to summarise some of the relevant points: Treatment for frostbite depends on how severe your symptoms are. You should always seek medical attention if you suspect you or someone else has frostbite. If symptoms are severe, ...


1

I do believe cold-shock is a real threat, but the reaction is a combination of physical and psychological reactions. As being dropped in near freezing water is a horrendous experience, even for the more hardy of us. The mind goes into full panic, only wanting to get up out of the water, often flailing and thrashing to do so. The physical effect just pours ...


1

Acclimatization isn't purely psychological; it is actually a physiologically different response based upon recent exposure and experience. Layering down over a period of time (days to weeks) could theoretically alter your biochemistry on a cellular level as you develop a different proportion of membrane proteins and salinity (see ...



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