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13

Some general rules: layer system also for the hands is a good idea but those gardening gloves won't work pretty well better use inner liner gloves (wool or even a softshell glove) and a warm mitten as the outer layer to avoid cooling off use hats (again use a layer-system) including a warm winter hat which covers the ears (also see this about heat loss ...


7

That lean-to in the link looks like it would shelter from all but the most wind driven rain. If you pack a cheap vinyl poncho that should take care of most situations. They are light enough that you can pack a second. What is the temperature rating on your sleeping bag? 15F/-10C will probably be more than warm enough. If you are carrying a summer bag, you ...


7

I did a lot of swimming in NW Ontario when I was a kid, and I've spent more time swimming in lakes and rivers than I have in swimming pools. I find the phrasing of this question curious, because I've never heard any one use the words "wild swimming" nor have I ever considered swimming in a mountain lake or a river "wild". None the less, there are some ...


6

If the suggestions in Everything's answer don't work, try these heating options: Heated gloves (I have linked to an example) Hand warmer packs to tuck into your gloves My wife has Reynaud's which leads to poor circulation in fingers and toes, so needs to use these solutions on occasion, and they are very effective.


5

IMO you totally don't need a tent. Plenty of people, including me, prefer to sleep out under the stars even if there's no hut. It can be difficult to sleep with a wind blowing across one's face, but that won't be happening inside the hut. It's also off the ground, so you won't be losing heat into the dirt. Yes, the temperature inside will be the same as ...


4

I have friends who swear by silk inners. They are thin, so can be worn under other gloves, but are extremely warm for the thickness. Combine these with windstopper outers - as mentioned elsewhere, layering is good practice. On the downside, silk is really expensive, at least where I live. On the upside, silk lasts a long time and doesn't get smelly.


4

The way to get started is to swim in areas that are marked as generally safe. These will typically be a sandy beach on the shores of a small lake. Provincial Parks generally have one of these with float lines marking the "safe" areas. As you can see, you're free to swim outside the lines if you want to. From http://www.ontarioparks.com/park/mikisew There ...


2

As EverythingRightPlace writes, you should focus on all your body parts. To survive the Polar Vortex you need: Winter boots. These should comprise of an outer boot and a removable inner boot. The inner boot should be well insulated from the outer boot. Trousers. You should wear long underpants, down-filled trousers and a wind stopper over that. Down ...


2

Canadian glacier lake swimmer here - You can train your body to overcome the cold shock response. It's a matter of mind over body, yes your body responds to the sudden shock of diving into cold water, but the trick to overcoming it is to relax, slow your brain down, and focus on controlling your breathing. The best way to do this minimize your movements, ...


1

Well, when you touch something very cold, it can be like touching something hot. You get the same reaction to jerk away from it quickly. I believe Cold Shock is essentially the same thing, except you're either immersed or covered in the cold water, so your brain goes into a state of panic as it's trying to get away from the water covering you - Obviously not ...



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