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9

By engaging in winter sports (where there is significant snow on the ground) you are already greatly reducing your impact. The biggest impacts to back-country areas from non-motorized recreation come from vegetation disturbance: boots grinding up plants and breaking topsoil, tents compressing vegetation, camp activity destroying vegetation, fire scars, etc. ...


7

You have heard both answers because both are right depending on the area and ecosystem. Established trails: If there is an established trail going where you need to go, you should stay on it. Even to the point that in a mucky area stay in the tread, rather than create a new trail beside it which might be dry for a while, but will eventually become a new ...


6

A lower size limit is designed to allow a fish to reach breeding age before it can be taken. An upper size limit is designed to prevent the most effective breeders from being taken. It is based on the fact that in many species a more mature adult will have a larger number of successful offspring, and fish continue to grow throughout their lives. Also, in ...


6

The best thing to do would have been not disturb them in the first place, but I do understand the need of this question. So I wouldn't add any advice like "Do not disturb them in the first place". From what I have seen, Buzzards and other raptors (not specifically the ones you mentioned) would return to kill if left alone. But, provided that it is done ...


5

There is one often forgotten thing in skiing that can be harmful. The waxes. The racing ones contain a lot of fluorocarbons that can stay in the environment for ages. The pure racing fluorocarbons (mostly powders) are dangerous even to people applying them and special masks should be worn (see). Consider using just pure hydrocarbon waxes or other waxes ...


4

Generally, fisheries management is habitat and species specific requiring different tools depending on the outcome desired, i.e more "eating size" fish, more breeding size, more small fry, etc. Adjacent bodies of water may vary significantly in habitat due to fishing pressure, localized impacts (agriculture, human access, etc. This from Minnesota Dept. ...


4

In certain BC rivers, fishing is catch and release only, it's illegal to fish with anything but a single barbless hook. I have a whole tackle box full of spoons that have been hacked to death by a pair of side cutters in order to make them legal for catch and release. When you hook a fish, reel them in normal, but pick them out of the water with a net, don'...


3

Fishing in the rivers around here is catch and release only on barbless hooks. The trick is to not get over excited when you get a bite, let the fish take the lure, when he runs with it'll set it itself, so don't tug on the rod. While he's on the hook you want to bring him in gentle, don't tug on the rod, let go and let him run with the line if he starts to ...


1

You say you go to wild places to get away from trails, but that is actually the root problem. One purpose of trails is to funnel all the human use to narrow areas to minimize the overall damage. Lots of places have policies that you need to stay on the trail for this reason. This is especially important in high use or fragile areas. Examples of the ...



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