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30

Absolutely not! Fire is the obvious risk, but carbon monoxide poisoning should be taken seriously as well. If the weather is bad, at the very least cook under the vestibule with maximum ventilation. Others have brought up a great point about bear country. It's recommended to cook and eat at least 100 yards away from your camp site when there may be bears ...


25

Note on boiling and stove weights, obviously there are dozens of stoves out there for every fuel. I'm just estimating based on commonly used stoves. Petroleum, Gas, White Gas, other liquid petrol products Stove weight: 12+ oz (340+ g) Water Boil per 100g fuel (rough): 5 to 6L Good: Works below freezing incredibly good heat fuel is easy to come by ...


23

Here is a good article on the types of rocks that explode: http://www.ehow.com/list_7360348_rocks-explode-around-fire-pits.html Generally if you rub two of the same rocks together and they crumble easily, then they are not safe to use. Hard rocks: The following rocks are not very likely to explode, but should be approached with with common sense. When ...


21

There's two main things that generally cause this, the first being the moisture content in the rock and the second being the type of rock. If the rock is wet and you heat it rapidly, any water will turn to steam and put pressure on the rock, forcing shards of it to break off rapidly. Secondly the type of rock matters, layered rocks such as sandstone are much ...


21

First things first. You do not need to purify all water sources. Just because it is not out of a tap does not make it immediately dirty. Most fresh wilderness water (providing it isn't stagnant, etc.) is fine for drinking. You should be familiar with the source of the water. Just because the river looks clean doesn't mean that an industrial unit isn't ...


20

The absolute best is going to be titanium, but it also happens to be the most expensive. I'm not sure where you heard that it shatters in the cold, but being a space age metal I would think it can handle cold earth temperatures just fine. If you can't shell out the cash for titanium it's more or less a toss up between aluminum and stainless steel. ...


19

Basically tin foil is your friend! Even though you could also place some of these foods directly on the embers, if you're willing to carry some tin foil and do a little bit of preparation, you can create some awesome meals on a campfire. Potatoes Image by Ryan Dickey Slice them open unpeeled and fill them with cream cheese Season with salt, chives, ...


18

The answers regarding flammability (and the ensuing death trap) and carbon monoxide poisoning are correct. Even in foul weather, cook outside your tent. If you do lots of camping in bad weather (New Zealand's West Coast?) get a tent with a vestibule. There is one additional problem: In bear country, you never want to cook too close to your tent, because if ...


16

Cooking raw brats over a fire is only dodgy because cooking brats well requires fairly precise (for a campfire) temperature control. Even with hot dogs, it can be a bit challenging to get the whole thing consistently cooked through without burning the outside. With a bratwurst, its larger size makes that especially difficult without some skill or tools. If ...


13

When I get to the "simmer" part of cooking on the Whisperlite, I take the pot off the stove, put the lid on, and wrap it in a towel including underneath and on top. Whatever I am cooking will stay simmery for at least 20-30 minutes that way. It's great for making a sauce with dehydrated ingredients. While the sauce is sitting aside staying hot, I can cook ...


13

Another one would be Damper, an Australian bush bread traditionally cooked in the hot ashes of a dying fire, with or without tin-foil (just don’t eat the crust). It has a pretty delicious smokey taste and is fun to make with the kids. I won’t suggest a particular recipe because there are so many variations. The core is just flour, baking soda, salt, and ...


12

It depends on what you are cooking Make sure you know your wood. Some woods produce toxic fumes. Others will produce a very unpleasant taste. What woods to use is a topic of it's own. If you are just roasting on a stick, that's all you need to know. Just get a flame and roast. However if you have other things... If you have space and a camp ...


12

One advantage teflon brings to the wilderness is how easy it is to clean. The heat on backpacker stoves can be hard to regulate, it's not uncommon for hot spots that get food stuck to the bottom of the pot or worse, burnt to the bottom (I'm looking at you pasta + sauce packets!). Teflon makes it less likely to get stuck, often needing only to be wiped off ...


11

The short answer: don't. Edit: Instead of simmering on the stove, remove the pot from the flame and keep it insulated to retain heat. See @KateGregory's excellent answer for more details. The long answer: you can reduce the pressure in the fuel bottle, and this will reduce the flow rate of the fuel. This is done by pumping fewer times! The exact number ...


10

I use this system exclusively, and there's an entire site dedicated to the variety of ways you can do it. I think it is generally called "freezer bag cooking", and the main site I'm aware of is called TrailCooking. I've always used ziplocks marked as "freezer bags" from the grocery store, but those ones you found seem like they would be perfect. There's ...


10

I think you mean "light" the fuel. "Lighten" means to reduce it's weight. It seems you want to ignite it. The basic problem is that the vapor pressure of ethanol goes down significantly with cold. Keep in mind that liquid doesn't actually burn, it's the gas the liquid gives off combining with atmospheric oxygen that actually burns. If you have a fuel ...


9

In addition to the fire hazard, cooking food in your tent in bear country is a good recipe for waking up to find a bear trashing your campsite, and/or you.


9

I'll answer a question in the comments: I will be curious to know what is the average amount of Co2 produced by a stove vs the average amount of co2 generated by human breathing. My guess would be that stove will win but I heard of people suffocate in closed cars while sleeping To make things simple, lets assume assume your body burns 2,600 ...


8

I learned how to build a cooking fire in Boy Scouts. Build the fire, and then let it burn down. The bright dancing flames are more fun for recreation, but are not helpful for cooking. When you have a bed of hot embers, that is a good cooking fire. Little or no flame, just a good source of heat. Embers are hotter than flame, too.


8

I have used hexamine fuel in sub-freezing temperatures before, and my experience is that it works reasonably well if you keep your stove protected from the wind. In cold weather it will take several cubes to get your water boiling. You really need to keep the stove protected from wind, though, even in warm weather, the flame gets blown off pretty easily. ...


8

We quite often cook on a small gas stove in the porch (vestibule) of the tent - as long as you are careful and don't leave it unattended, just be sensible. I have seen a tent go up in flames, and they burn extremely quickly so I'm aware of the danger, but I've never felt at risk. Thankfully in the UK we don't have to worry about Bears...


8

I'll start by saying that it doesn't really matter how cookware material interacts with the human body, because you aren't going to eat your cookware. What is important is how it reacts with the foods that you cook, particularly acidic foods (which is why you don't want to use cast iron to make tomato sauces). In this regard, titanium is as close to perfect ...


7

It really depends on the type of tent. You should not cook in a standard outdoor tent. However there are tents like the "Kohte" and the "Yurt" of (mainly German) scouts that are designed to have a fire burning inside. These tents are made of cotton and have no floor. Also they are heavier than typical expedition tents. As always you have to weigh the pros ...


7

If you are in bear country, I agree 100% with everyone - cook somewhere else. 100m away minimum. In winter, not in bear country, getting out of your tent to cook sucks. Fortunately, many mountaineers have discovered that some stoves do not produce excessive carbon monoxide. And there's a handy table in this article at Backpacking Light that describes ...


7

The issue with the bottles isn't so much the "bottle" as it is the pump. On an MSR bottle, a pump screws into the top, then a specific MSR-style hose (from a stove) attaches to the pump. On a Trangia, the attachment system is different (as per This Gas Burner, or This One, depending on fuel, I think). The question in your case would be whether the threading ...


7

While there seem to be a few different mixtures, key to them all is a lower vapourisation temperature requirement and lower viscosity so they are easier to ignite. In cold weather, normal fuel may not flow will or may not be able to light as it won't vapourise.


7

Different gasses have different boiling points. Under boiling point the gas is liquid and don't have enough pressure to come out from the canister (if used in upright). The boiling points of usual gasses used in (camping) gas stoves are: Propane: −42.25 to −42.04 °C Butane: −1 to 1 °C Iso-butane: −13 to −9 °C source Wikipedia: Propane, butane and ...


7

Cooking as a large group is bad for a variety of reasons: More work to coordinate roles, responsibilities. Limited cooking resources (stoves, pots, etc.) means waiting, frustration, idleness, or carrying more than one of everything. More likely to waste fuel. Waste of energy/misuse of downtime e.g. Instead of cooking every 3rd day/meal you're cooking every ...


6

I believe the threads are generally compatible, BUT that's not the issue. Trangia bottles are not metal (they're a plastic like material, perhaps floridated HDPE). Trangia bottles are NOT built to handle pressure and could be very dangerous if used with a pressurized white gas stove (such as a Whisperlite, Nova, Omnifuel, Dragonfly, etc). On the other hand ...


6

What type of cookware you choose depends on what type of cooking you do. Titanium is certainly the lightest, and it's great if all you do in your pot is boil water to add to dehydrated foods (Lipton noodles, Mountain House, homemade boil-in-bag meals, etc.) or to make beverages. I've never seen or heard of a titanium pot shattering at low temperatures. ...



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