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9

I think you have the right idea. Leave No Trace principles (and wilderness permit regulations in many areas) dictate that washing be done at least 100 feet from camp, trail, or stream. If there's some soil nearby that would be the best spot, because there'll be higher activity from decomposing organisms there which will break down any tiny bits of food you ...


8

When I cook home-dehydrated food, I often rehydrate for a day - but not on the stove. In the morning, I boil water for coffee, pour some over dehydrated meat in a Nalgene, leave the lid on loosely until the water is only warm, then tighten the lid firmly. It spends the day in the pack and by dinner time the meat is rehydrated. For some vegetables, such as ...


4

No, it is not safe to burn just any kind of wood, because some woods contain toxins that have the potential to be fatal if inhaled as ash (poison oak, poison ivy). However, most wood found in nature is safe. There's no such thing as smoke that won't cause damage to the lungs, smoke is a particle, your body has many levels of defense to try and prevent ...


3

Following strict leave no trace principles, you're already doing a pretty good job. Where you can improve is to use no soap, small amounts of biodegradable soap are acceptable, but you can clean you dishes with just hot water. When you're done scrubbing, it's best to strain your scraps out of the water and pack them out with the rest of your garbage, then ...


2

You shouldn't inhale too much smoke. Everything which is (or used to be) alive is mostly carbon, and whenever carbon burns, you get carbon-monoxide which is poisonous. Symptoms of acute carbon-monoxide poisoning are: Dull headache Weakness Dizziness Nausea Shortness of breath Confusion Blurred vision When you have these symptoms while spending some time ...


2

Presuming you're planning on eating at/near your vehicle you're not really limited by the weight or bulk of the food. So, anything you can easily cook in 1 or 2 pots is a good bet. Generally, I have some version of pasta/rice/couscous and sauce. You can make your own sauce if you can get fresh ingredients or get reasonably cheap jars or dried packets. I ...


2

A camping grill is not the indispensable cooking utensil in the wild, at least not anymore. Back in the day cooking over a fire was your only option for eating hot food, and a grill was the lightest thing you could carry for cooking. Cooking over a campfire is still fun, it's nostalgic for a lot of people, but it's not necessary in the backcountry these ...


1

This is not a survival technique. The way to determine how many calories is in a particular food item is to measure the amount of heat energy emitted when an item is burned. Anything burned to ash is basically calorie free as far as food value goes. Ash is composed of whatever was unable to vaporize into smoke in a fire. The hotter the fire, the more ...


1

To answer the third question: Charcoal is basically wood (technically any biomass, but it's usually wood) that has had its water and other volatile components completely removed, leaving pretty much a lump of almost entirely carbon. Charcoal compared to wood is similar to comparing distilled, concentrated alcohol to sugar cane. The charcoal burns ...


1

Pressure treated wood is especially toxic, since it contains chemicals meant to preserve it and kill things that would destroy it. Never burn pressure-treated wood. Other answers covered the rest pretty well.


1

This slightly depends on size and heat output or your stove, but camping stoves are universally good at one thing, heating water. So this makes them ideal for using with dyhydrated food's. These have come a long way from super and pot noodles and you can now get some pretty decent tasty food that you simply have to add water too, there are a couple of good ...



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