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19

Basically tin foil is your friend! Even though you could also place some of these foods directly on the embers, if you're willing to carry some tin foil and do a little bit of preparation, you can create some awesome meals on a campfire. Potatoes Image by Ryan Dickey Slice them open unpeeled and fill them with cream cheese Season with salt, chives, ...


16

Cooking raw brats over a fire is only dodgy because cooking brats well requires fairly precise (for a campfire) temperature control. Even with hot dogs, it can be a bit challenging to get the whole thing consistently cooked through without burning the outside. With a bratwurst, its larger size makes that especially difficult without some skill or tools. If ...


13

Another one would be Damper, an Australian bush bread traditionally cooked in the hot ashes of a dying fire, with or without tin-foil (just don’t eat the crust). It has a pretty delicious smokey taste and is fun to make with the kids. I won’t suggest a particular recipe because there are so many variations. The core is just flour, baking soda, salt, and ...


7

Cooking as a large group is bad for a variety of reasons: More work to coordinate roles, responsibilities. Limited cooking resources (stoves, pots, etc.) means waiting, frustration, idleness, or carrying more than one of everything. More likely to waste fuel. Waste of energy/misuse of downtime e.g. Instead of cooking every 3rd day/meal you're cooking every ...


6

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


6

Different gasses have different boiling points. Under boiling point the gas is liquid and don't have enough pressure to come out from the canister (if used in upright). The boiling points of usual gasses used in (camping) gas stoves are: Propane: −42.25 to −42.04 °C Butane: −1 to 1 °C Iso-butane: −13 to −9 °C source Wikipedia: Propane, butane and ...


5

Pork should be cooked to a minmimum of 63C or 145F. This is regardless of what type of pork it is. Providing you heat all (including the center) the pork to this temperature or above you will be fine and will not get ill. Ideally you should also let the food rest once cooked. This allows time for the heat to destroy all bacteria in the meat (with the added ...


5

To get the hygiene part out of the way, everybody needs to bring or have access to good (alcohol based) hand sanitizer at all times. For deciding on the size of cooking groups: how large is your cooking pot? At scouting we either set up a base camp where we'll cook for the entire group (25 persons) or when hiking we use smaller gear and would split up in ...


4

I've had celiac for 8 years now. I am self described outdoor enthusiast and celiac is nothing that should hold you back from having fun. Out on the trail I eat quinoa, brown and black rice (black rice is super healthy), dried fruits, nuts. I'll normally bring one or two cans of soup or baked beans, sometimes canned chili, corn tortillas, jerky, lentils, ...


4

I did find ethanol at Canadian Tire (in downtown Toronto). However, they only had a large bottle (almost 4L), so it's not suitable if one is already on their way; you should still get a smaller bottle and find a place to store the larger container.


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


4

Going to make some assumptions here. Communal cooking People bringing own ingredients, contributions Given the two above Reasonably large pot (two liter) Reasonably large pan (more than 8") Grill surface/fuel. It is hard to advise here without knowing more. But something like this coleman would work. If you are SURE you can have a fire, just grab a ...


4

Here's what I've done for group camping (both car & canoe camping). Communal food & cooking. It's just easier. Cooking equipment. You bring what you need depending on what food you buy, or buy food that can be cooked with the equipment you have. Some details. Pot/pans. Think about what you may be cooking at the same time. Are you going to boil ...


3

It might be more dangerous simply due to the fact that it is raw - but this danger is real only in the case you travel with the meat for 2-3 days without proper cooling. If you cook it the first evening of your hike then it should be fine - and again, whatsisname's answer applies. For longer trips, I would recommend to take smoked sausages, something ...


3

not particularly, there are however meats which are safer than others. For example: solid chunks of beef only needs to be seared.(still a good idea to cook through but less important) To avoid confusion: this does not mean you can eat rotting beef but if it's not rotten, beef doesn't contain parasites all the way through and normally it's only the ...


3

The best tasting dish I personally ate that was cooked over fire is mandi. Image Credit: Wikipedia. Mandi is usually made from rice (basmati), meat (lamb or chicken), and a mixture of spices. The meat used is usually a young and small sized lamb to enhance the taste further. The main thing which differentiates mandi is that the meat is cooked in ...


3

If you use wood chunk charcoal, skirt steak is awesome cooked right on the coals. Credit: Alton Brown, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5y2voEWJ6U


3

Picture via Google from http://www.south-africa-tours-and-travel.com/south-african-barbecue.html Ideally you actually bbq by smearing butter on them first then grilling. The outside caramelizes into golden to just short of black. Some black is fine too, it all tastes so much better than boiled or in foil. If you lack a grill then desperate measures ...


3

The key here is to plan the meals. If you know all the dinners you will make you will know what pots etc you need. That said: Plates 1 per person + 2 or 3 for cooking purposes Mugs 1 per person, more if oatmeal is a morning thing for you knives, forks, spoons 1 per person wooden spoon, tongs, flipper, ladle (or mug as ladle) according to the meals you plan ...


2

Use a food Thermos to retain heat and simulate a pressure cooker. Save fuel. Opens up the burner for cooking other dishes. Thermos can be used to carry other items when not in use. Cheers


2

Something we always did as scouts was to put cut up potatoes, vegetables, and sausage into a tin foil bowl and stick it in the fire. I always remember them cooking very well and they were also very hearty. Also, very little setup/cleanup; which I am always for! Breakfast can also be done in a foil bowl, just put scrambled eggs, sausage, green onions, ...


2

Once I did bread buns stuffed with sweet cottage cheese, some cream and raisins, wrapped up in tin foil and placed in the embers for some 10 minutes. Similar: cut out the middle of an apple, fill it with diced nuts, raisins, sugar, cinnamon. Other one: dice any juicy vegetable (courgette, eggplant, onions, mushrooms, tomatoes, paprikas), apply some ...


1

Tinned beans, or any tinned food that is sealed. Nothing to do with food poisoning, it's because the tins can explode as the pressure builds up.


1

One of my favourites is breadfruit, which I acquired a taste for while living in Jamaica. They apparently grow all over Southeast Asia and the Pacific too. In Jamaica they grow wild practically everywhere (there is a peak season when they end up littering the ground in places), making them a staple bush food. I've seen them occasionally in the supermarket ...


1

I have cooked for 19 people on a five day trip around Stewart Island in New Zealand. We were eating dehydrated meals (from Backcountry), so our cooking requirements were three large billies and cookers to boil lots of water. Pretty simple stuff. My main advice to you is about serving. The first night, I tried dealing with all the "can I have less of that ...


1

One expensive component is the cooking pot; depending on if you already have one, you might want to find a stove that is compatible with your existing pot. Trail Designs have several models that can burn both alcohol and wood. You can order their stoves for specific pot sizes. I have experience with their Sidewinder Ti-Tri which can also burn esbit. I would ...


1

I have several gluten-intolerant people in my life, and though I haven't taken them camping, here's how I would feed them. Breakfast: for a short trip, bring some gluten-free muffins or bagels. For a longer trip, learn how to make a dough (premix the rice flour, xanthan gum etc at home) you can rise and then fry into English muffins. Not kidding, we did ...


1

While the depressurization trick does work very well, its also not necessary. I've used the whisperlite to simmer just by turning the flame down real low. You have to be very gentle on the valve and be looking right at the flame to gauge it, but it works. Based on experience using this stove for 70+ days of trail work (breakfast and dinner each day).


1

If it's an open top cat stove (or any open top container) you can use gel. If it's a trangia style stove with tiny vents - no. Well, yes you can - the gel will still burn out of the trangia fill hole but it will clog up the vents.



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