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23

First things first. You do not need to purify all water sources. Just because it is not out of a tap does not make it immediately dirty. Most fresh wilderness water (providing it isn't stagnant, etc.) is fine for drinking. You should be familiar with the source of the water. Just because the river looks clean doesn't mean that an industrial unit isn't ...


20

Basically tin foil is your friend! Even though you could also place some of these foods directly on the embers, if you're willing to carry some tin foil and do a little bit of preparation, you can create some awesome meals on a campfire. Potatoes Image by Ryan Dickey Slice them open unpeeled and fill them with cream cheese Season with salt, chives, ...


17

Cooking raw brats over a fire is only dodgy because cooking brats well requires fairly precise (for a campfire) temperature control. Even with hot dogs, it can be a bit challenging to get the whole thing consistently cooked through without burning the outside. With a bratwurst, its larger size makes that especially difficult without some skill or tools. If ...


13

I'd try and be more specific towards the kind of the fuel we are talking about: White Gas Burns clean without any smell and/or effect on food taste. Accidental Spilling of the fuel is not much to be worried about. Evaporates very quickly, without leaving an odor. White gas is safer to store and transport than probably most of the other products. If ...


13

Another one would be Damper, an Australian bush bread traditionally cooked in the hot ashes of a dying fire, with or without tin-foil (just don’t eat the crust). It has a pretty delicious smokey taste and is fun to make with the kids. I won’t suggest a particular recipe because there are so many variations. The core is just flour, baking soda, salt, and ...


13

This information is available under the Specs on Jetboil's website. 100g canister: 100g fuel; gross weight 194g; empty weight 94g (51.5% fuel by weight) 230g canister: 230g fuel; gross weight 356g; empty weight 126g (64.6% fuel by weight) 450g canister: 450g fuel; gross weight 645g; empty weight 195g (69.8% fuel by weight)


9

If you don't have a scale, you can still figure out roughly how much fuel is in each canister with a simple bowl of water. Drop a full canister in bowl of water and mark the water line. Then, drop an empty one in the bowl of water and mark the water line. This gives you your full and empty lines for reference. Now you can drop each of your partially-full ...


9

I think you have the right idea. Leave No Trace principles (and wilderness permit regulations in many areas) dictate that washing be done at least 100 feet from camp, trail, or stream. If there's some soil nearby that would be the best spot, because there'll be higher activity from decomposing organisms there which will break down any tiny bits of food you ...


9

No, it is not safe to burn just any kind of wood, because some woods contain toxins that have the potential to be fatal if inhaled as ash (poison oak, poison ivy). However, most wood found in nature is safe. There's no such thing as smoke that won't cause damage to the lungs, smoke is a particle, your body has many levels of defense to try and prevent ...


8

When I cook home-dehydrated food, I often rehydrate for a day - but not on the stove. In the morning, I boil water for coffee, pour some over dehydrated meat in a Nalgene, leave the lid on loosely until the water is only warm, then tighten the lid firmly. It spends the day in the pack and by dinner time the meat is rehydrated. For some vegetables, such as ...


7

Different gasses have different boiling points. Under boiling point the gas is liquid and don't have enough pressure to come out from the canister (if used in upright). The boiling points of usual gasses used in (camping) gas stoves are: Propane: −42.25 to −42.04 °C Butane: −1 to 1 °C Iso-butane: −13 to −9 °C source Wikipedia: Propane, butane and ...


7

The standard expedition stove for extreme conditions would be an MSR XGK. You will likely want to bring a pair of them, along with a repair kit, on the assumption that due to the cold or poor quality fuel you'll break a pump or need to make other repairs. Now, you may be thinking "what are all those people doing with canister stoves on ...


7

As someone with +10 years experience as a boyscout, i never had an incident or heard of an incident where cooking with wilderness water led to bacteria infections, sickness, etc. You should take care not to use stagnant water (this was also mentioned in other answers) and I'd personally avoid very shallow streams, to avoid dirt and bacteria from the ground ...


6

Pork should be cooked to a minmimum of 63C or 145F. This is regardless of what type of pork it is. Providing you heat all (including the center) the pork to this temperature or above you will be fine and will not get ill. Ideally you should also let the food rest once cooked. This allows time for the heat to destroy all bacteria in the meat (with the added ...


6

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


6

You shouldn't inhale too much smoke. Everything which is (or used to be) alive is mostly carbon, and whenever carbon burns, you get carbon-monoxide which is poisonous. Symptoms of acute carbon-monoxide poisoning are: Dull headache Weakness Dizziness Nausea Shortness of breath Confusion Blurred vision When you have these symptoms while spending some time ...


5

Going to make some assumptions here. Communal cooking People bringing own ingredients, contributions Given the two above Reasonably large pot (two liter) Reasonably large pan (more than 8") Grill surface/fuel. It is hard to advise here without knowing more. But something like this coleman would work. If you are SURE you can have a fire, just grab a ...


5

Here's what I've done for group camping (both car & canoe camping). Communal food & cooking. It's just easier. Cooking equipment. You bring what you need depending on what food you buy, or buy food that can be cooked with the equipment you have. Some details. Pot/pans. Think about what you may be cooking at the same time. Are you going to boil ...


5

To answer the third question: Charcoal is basically wood (technically any biomass, but it's usually wood) that has had its water and other volatile components completely removed, leaving pretty much a lump of almost entirely carbon. Charcoal compared to wood is similar to comparing distilled, concentrated alcohol to sugar cane. The charcoal burns ...


5

This is not a survival technique. The way to determine how many calories is in a particular food item is to measure the amount of heat energy emitted when an item is burned. Anything burned to ash is basically calorie free as far as food value goes. Ash is composed of whatever was unable to vaporize into smoke in a fire. The hotter the fire, the more ...


4

The best tasting dish I personally ate that was cooked over fire is mandi. Image Credit: Wikipedia. Mandi is usually made from rice (basmati), meat (lamb or chicken), and a mixture of spices. The meat used is usually a young and small sized lamb to enhance the taste further. The main thing which differentiates mandi is that the meat is cooked in ...


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


4

The key here is to plan the meals. If you know all the dinners you will make you will know what pots etc you need. That said: Plates 1 per person + 2 or 3 for cooking purposes Mugs 1 per person, more if oatmeal is a morning thing for you knives, forks, spoons 1 per person wooden spoon, tongs, flipper, ladle (or mug as ladle) according to the meals you plan ...


4

In my experience, the biggest culprits for leaking fuel are bad o-rings, but replacement o-rings of the wrong size and loose caps have also played a part. Over-tightened caps can also be a problem especially if the o-rings are a bit off size. Another consideration is the amount of fuel spilled on the stove or canister during fueling and use. Especially if ...


4

not particularly, there are however meats which are safer than others. For example: solid chunks of beef only needs to be seared.(still a good idea to cook through but less important) To avoid confusion: this does not mean you can eat rotting beef but if it's not rotten, beef doesn't contain parasites all the way through and normally it's only the ...


4

Pressure treated wood is especially toxic, since it contains chemicals meant to preserve it and kill things that would destroy it. Never burn pressure-treated wood. Other answers covered the rest pretty well.


4

A camping grill is not the indispensable cooking utensil in the wild, at least not anymore. Back in the day cooking over a fire was your only option for eating hot food, and a grill was the lightest thing you could carry for cooking. Cooking over a campfire is still fun, it's nostalgic for a lot of people, but it's not necessary in the backcountry these ...


3

It might be more dangerous simply due to the fact that it is raw - but this danger is real only in the case you travel with the meat for 2-3 days without proper cooling. If you cook it the first evening of your hike then it should be fine - and again, whatsisname's answer applies. For longer trips, I would recommend to take smoked sausages, something ...


3

If you use wood chunk charcoal, skirt steak is awesome cooked right on the coals. Credit: Alton Brown, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5y2voEWJ6U



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