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8

I'll start by saying that it doesn't really matter how cookware material interacts with the human body, because you aren't going to eat your cookware. What is important is how it reacts with the foods that you cook, particularly acidic foods (which is why you don't want to use cast iron to make tomato sauces). In this regard, titanium is as close to perfect ...


6

Different gasses have different boiling points. Under boiling point the gas is liquid and don't have enough pressure to come out from the canister (if used in upright). The boiling points of usual gasses used in (camping) gas stoves are: Propane: −42.25 to −42.04 °C Butane: −1 to 1 °C Iso-butane: −13 to −9 °C source Wikipedia: Propane, butane and ...


6

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


6

Cooking as a large group is bad for a variety of reasons: More work to coordinate roles, responsibilities. Limited cooking resources (stoves, pots, etc.) means waiting, frustration, idleness, or carrying more than one of everything. More likely to waste fuel. Waste of energy/misuse of downtime e.g. Instead of cooking every 3rd day/meal you're cooking every ...


5

To get the hygiene part out of the way, everybody needs to bring or have access to good (alcohol based) hand sanitizer at all times. For deciding on the size of cooking groups: how large is your cooking pot? At scouting we either set up a base camp where we'll cook for the entire group (25 persons) or when hiking we use smaller gear and would split up in ...


4

I did find ethanol at Canadian Tire (in downtown Toronto). However, they only had a large bottle (almost 4L), so it's not suitable if one is already on their way; you should still get a smaller bottle and find a place to store the larger container.


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


4

In the article "Is that newfangled cookware safe?" no special mention is made for titanium. Titanium is not commonly found in cookware other than backpacking because it is simply terrible for any cooking tasks other than perhaps boiling water and it is expensive. Many backpackers are willing to pay the extra money for extra weight saving. According to ...


4

I've had celiac for 8 years now. I am self described outdoor enthusiast and celiac is nothing that should hold you back from having fun. Out on the trail I eat quinoa, brown and black rice (black rice is super healthy), dried fruits, nuts. I'll normally bring one or two cans of soup or baked beans, sometimes canned chili, corn tortillas, jerky, lentils, ...


2

Use a food Thermos to retain heat and simulate a pressure cooker. Save fuel. Opens up the burner for cooking other dishes. Thermos can be used to carry other items when not in use. Cheers


2

I believe that Ecoque is the Pyromid resurrected. I found this in my search for new liners: http://www.backwoodshome.com/blogs/ClaireWolfe/2012/06/05/pyromid-is-back/ The liners are on Amazon for U$7.99 per dozen. (the stoves run over U$100) I can't get thru to the Ecoque website at work (filtering.....), but they do have one: www.ecoque.com I haven't ...


1

One expensive component is the cooking pot; depending on if you already have one, you might want to find a stove that is compatible with your existing pot. Trail Designs have several models that can burn both alcohol and wood. You can order their stoves for specific pot sizes. I have experience with their Sidewinder Ti-Tri which can also burn esbit. I would ...


1

I have several gluten-intolerant people in my life, and though I haven't taken them camping, here's how I would feed them. Breakfast: for a short trip, bring some gluten-free muffins or bagels. For a longer trip, learn how to make a dough (premix the rice flour, xanthan gum etc at home) you can rise and then fry into English muffins. Not kidding, we did ...


1

If it's an open top cat stove (or any open top container) you can use gel. If it's a trangia style stove with tiny vents - no. Well, yes you can - the gel will still burn out of the trangia fill hole but it will clog up the vents.



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