Hot answers tagged

15

Yes boiling water at 70oC will burn you. The above chart is for hot water heater settings and burn/scalding. As you can see from the graph being exposed to 70o C water for about half a second is enough to burn your skin. That isn't a long exposure time. As far as the cold and other factors well that just depends on too many variables. The answer is ...


11

I usually don't carry any kind of stove with me when I go hunting - this could be anytime from September to November or in May and early June. The weather can vary wildly during these times and I've experienced every kind of weather, from 10 below (F) and snow, to 30 degrees and freezing rain, to 90 (F) and dry. I found that going without hot food for up ...


11

No, it is not safe to burn just any kind of wood, because some woods contain toxins that have the potential to be fatal if inhaled as ash (poison oak, poison ivy). However, most wood found in nature is safe. There's no such thing as smoke that won't cause damage to the lungs, smoke is a particle, your body has many levels of defense to try and prevent ...


11

You can cook meat on a wooden skewer, piecing it like a kebab, and turning it frequently to prevent burning and to allow it to cook evenly. Similarly you can do this with two sticks and have the meat tied between the two. This is useful for smaller chunks, but becomes difficult with larger ones. You also will have to take care with dripping fat which can ...


10

I like using a soap and sponge, but it's not the only solution. It is possible to cut the weight of a soap and sponge setup pretty significantly. Using a small scrubby like the one shown below works well and is much lighter. You can also take a regular sponge and cut it into a much smaller mini-sponge which is typically still fine for the duration of a ...


10

You shouldn't inhale too much smoke. Everything which is (or used to be) alive is mostly carbon, and whenever carbon burns, you get carbon-monoxide which is poisonous. Symptoms of acute carbon-monoxide poisoning are: Dull headache Weakness Dizziness Nausea Shortness of breath Confusion Blurred vision When you have these symptoms while spending some time ...


10

Here is the list of stuff I would consider taking on longer hikes: trail mix chocolate muesli bars more expensive energy bars are great for really demanding stuff, where energy to weight ratio really counts (e.g. multi pitch climbing). They are also more filling than muesli bars. beef jerky dried sausage vacuum-packed hard cheese peanut butter or nutella ...


9

One option, if you still want hot food with no real possibility for starting a fire, would be MREs (Meals Ready to Eat). These include a Flameless Ration Heater that rely on a contained chemical reaction to warm food. They are a bit on the bulky side though. Personally, for my lunches while backpacking I like Ready to Eat Tuna Salad Pouches along with some ...


9

Your main problem I'd say is that keeping cooked rice unrefrigerated and then not heating rice adequately can potentially cause you to become very unwell! There is even specific guidance about the reheating of rice on the NHS web site: Can reheating rice cause food poisoning? Yes. You can get food poisoning from eating reheated rice. However, it's ...


8

To answer the third question: Charcoal is basically wood (technically any biomass, but it's usually wood) that has had its water and other volatile components completely removed, leaving pretty much a lump of almost entirely carbon. Charcoal compared to wood is similar to comparing distilled, concentrated alcohol to sugar cane. The charcoal burns ...


8

A camping grill is not the indispensable cooking utensil in the wild, at least not anymore. Back in the day cooking over a fire was your only option for eating hot food, and a grill was the lightest thing you could carry for cooking. Cooking over a campfire is still fun, it's nostalgic for a lot of people, but it's not necessary in the backcountry these ...


7

A tab ground up to produce a powder will have a higher surface area, therefore the fuel is more readily available for burning, this is why you can light a ground tab using a flint and steel. The flint and steel produces less energy for a shorter period of time than a match or lighter so it needs access to more fuel initially to catch (think of the fire ...


7

Nhinkle gives an amazing answer here, but I wanted to add an option which we quite often use, which is to soapy wash less often throughout the day. This will depend on what you cook / eat / water supply etc however. For example when camping we often eat, packet noodles, porridge, beans, packet soups, couscous etc from our cups or mess tins. My point here ...


7

If you have clay, you can form it into a sheet and wrap the meat with it. You cover the thing with hot coals and wait. When it is ready you break the shell and retrieve the goods inside. Baking Meat In Clay Alternatively, if you have flour you can do the same but with dough. The dough will be burned to char, but the food inside will be protected by the ...


7

Fire pit is always a good one. Dig a hole. Build a nice fire and put stones in it until they heat up ( don't use stones from a river as they will burst). Drop the stones into the hole, add meat wrapped in leaves or rushes and fill the hole back in with the excavated soil. Leave for an hour or two and you will have beautifully cooked meat. Also works with ...


7

This is not a survival technique. The way to determine how many calories is in a particular food item is to measure the amount of heat energy emitted when an item is burned. Anything burned to ash is basically calorie free as far as food value goes. Ash is composed of whatever was unable to vaporize into smoke in a fire. The hotter the fire, the more ...


7

Keep in mind that any water you are cooking with is still liquids you are intaking. A pantry full of dehydrated food is an awesome weightsaver in places were you always have water available but in a dry place you need to carry it with you. Efficiency-wise, I personally found the scout kelly-kettle type stoves ( kelly kettle + pot on top) great for boiling ...


6

Pressure treated wood is especially toxic, since it contains chemicals meant to preserve it and kill things that would destroy it. Never burn pressure-treated wood. Other answers covered the rest pretty well.


6

Apparently there are various grades of Mylar pouches (one of the companies I work with switched from bags from some Asian seller to a marginally more expensive North-American company because the first one did not have any explicit certification as food grade, even if they don't pack food in them). The difference apparently is in the composition of the inner ...


5

Rumex includes both sorrels and docks. The sorrels are generally more widely eaten. You can eat all of them, although they're pretty acid. Sliced finely with other salad greens, they add some bite. You can also wilt them down as you would spinach for a risotto or soup. ...


5

The short answer to your question is yes you can get a stove to light and cook your egg on the top of Everest if you really wanted to do it. Backpacking stoves are pressurized All of the backpacking stoves I've used use some sort of pressurized fuel system. This means that the ambient air pressure isn't going to affect the flow of the fuel. Fuel ...


5

Granite, marble and jade are all common stones used for mortar/pestle combinations. There are probably many other stones that are safe, but you want to avoid the following: anything that is porous such as sandstone or dolomite anything that will break apart easily, mainly sedimentary stone anything that might expose you to metal toxicity such lead or ...


5

Honestly you are better off bringing some other form of starch, such as hard tack or saltines or something similar. Take a bite of cracker, and take a sip of water and chew. Rice and rice water, when kept at unsafe temperature develops a toxin that is used by doctors and pharmacists to induce vommitting such as when someone eats something they shouldn't ...


4

The most ancient form of simmering is to use a piece of supple tanned leather and some stones. It works with a plastic bag too. You have to make a fire and heat 3-4 fist-sized stones in it. You also have to form a pouch from your leather somehow, e.g. By binding the corners to a stick and suspending it. A nylon bag doesn't need that, it can be laid in a ...


4

One technique that I remember from my old boy scout book was putting a steak directly on hot coals. Covering fish in clay and burying it in the fire is also a good technique. If we allow ourselves to use string then we can use a technique called string roasting. http://users.stlcc.edu/mfuller/pennsic2007cooking.html One person to study is chef Francis ...


4

Cooking or not, being able to heat water can be very useful in many cases. A basic alcohol stove, a little fuel, and a fireproof cup will weight less than 200g and fit all in the cup, so that's not much of a big deal. (All for less than 15$ for basic stuff). You'll get tea in the morning and you'll be able to boil water if needs be (sterilize water from a ...


4

First of all, you want to bring a lightweight hatchet with which you can split the green firewood. Remember that the more surface area you expose the more flame you will get and the hotter the fire will get. Last week, my friends and I were having a hard time with your same problem, so we made a bellows (air pump to fire) with an air mattress pump (4 D ...


4

This may be a contrary position, but I think methane has actually gone out of favour in many parts of the world (definitely in Europe) as propane and butane have become popular. In fact propane or butane have greater energy by volume and are available at every camping supplies shop.


4

For butane/isobutane/propane canisters, the stove design, affecting the temperature in the canister or liquid feed pipe, and the boiling point of the gas mixture would matter. At very low temperatures even the O ring rubber type would matter as some types go less rubbery and do not seal properly. For instance, if the temperature of an upright butane ...


4

If you have to carry all your water with you then you might as well use 'wet' food rather than dehydrated as it works out at the same weight in the end anyway. Pouch type meals are becoming increasingly mainstream and have the advantage of being perfectly palatable cold and straight from the packet. In cold weather you can carry them in an inside pocket of ...



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