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There are two imminent dangers to cooking in your tent: the first, and most obvious, is the fire hazard, while the second, and more subtle, is carbon monoxide poisoning. and some times you are with your kids during camping so why you take risk by cook inside tent. If outer weather is not good and you have to cook inside tent then Keep the door open a ...


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I've gotten pretty sufficient fires on a rainy fall day with relatively wet wood. Something that I often do is collect a lot of wet wood use the fire to dry out other logs. Make sure they're relatively small so they dry out by the time you need them. Just keep putting wood around the fire to dry as you use it. A good recommendation from @whatsisname is you ...


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First of all, you want to bring a lightweight hatchet with which you can split the green firewood. Remember that the more surface area you expose the more flame you will get and the hotter the fire will get. Last week, my friends and I were having a hard time with your same problem, so we made a bellows (air pump to fire) with an air mattress pump (4 D ...


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I started out cooking actual meals, which was time consuming and required a lot of clean up. Its not practical to pack out waste from food prep cleanup(like waste water), and I started to realize it was not in good ethic to do so. So I started with the mentality boil don't cook. I've gone ahead and invested in a MSR WindBoiler(similar to the jetboil). This ...


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Cooking or not, being able to heat water can be very useful in many cases. A basic alcohol stove, a little fuel, and a fireproof cup will weight less than 200g and fit all in the cup, so that's not much of a big deal. (All for less than 15$ for basic stuff). You'll get tea in the morning and you'll be able to boil water if needs be (sterilize water from a ...


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I usually don't carry any kind of stove with me when I go hunting - this could be anytime from September to November or in May and early June. The weather can vary wildly during these times and I've experienced every kind of weather, from 10 below (F) and snow, to 30 degrees and freezing rain, to 90 (F) and dry. I found that going without hot food for up ...


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Just considering weight: The great advantage is that you save weight by not carrying a stove and fuel, a pot, a Sierra cup and a largish spoon for stirring. The disadvantage is that you carry more weight than if you had taken freeze-dried or dehydrated food. That is, you have to carry the water content of all your food, which can add up, unless you subsist ...


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Pros You don't need to carry a stove or fuel. The space and weight that would be spent on these can be devoted to other things, or eliminated altogether. You don't need to take the time to cook things. If there's any meal preparation involving rehydration, it generally just involves putting water into the meal package a certain time before you plan to eat ...



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