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3

Here in Brazil, more specifically in the southern states of the country, we are used to make the weekly Churrasco. It's basically a way of cooking meat with skewers (made of iron, but you can make it with wooden ones aswell). You pierce the meat with those bad boys and place them on top of a Churrasqueira. Inside the Churrasqueira, you have your ember and ...


6

Nhinkle gives an amazing answer here, but I wanted to add an option which we quite often use, which is to soapy wash less often throughout the day. This will depend on what you cook / eat / water supply etc however. For example when camping we often eat, packet noodles, porridge, beans, packet soups, couscous etc from our cups or mess tins. My point here ...


8

I like using a soap and sponge, but it's not the only solution. It is possible to cut the weight of a soap and sponge setup pretty significantly. Using a small scrubby like the one shown below works well and is much lighter. You can also take a regular sponge and cut it into a much smaller mini-sponge which is typically still fine for the duration of a ...


4

The most ancient form of simmering is to use a piece of supple tanned leather and some stones. It works with a plastic bag too. You have to make a fire and heat 3-4 fist-sized stones in it. You also have to form a pouch from your leather somehow, e.g. By binding the corners to a stick and suspending it. A nylon bag doesn't need that, it can be laid in a ...


4

One technique that I remember from my old boy scout book was putting a steak directly on hot coals. Covering fish in clay and burying it in the fire is also a good technique. If we allow ourselves to use string then we can use a technique called string roasting. http://users.stlcc.edu/mfuller/pennsic2007cooking.html One person to study is chef Francis ...


7

Fire pit is always a good one. Dig a hole. Build a nice fire and put stones in it until they heat up ( don't use stones from a river as they will burst). Drop the stones into the hole, add meat wrapped in leaves or rushes and fill the hole back in with the excavated soil. Leave for an hour or two and you will have beautifully cooked meat. Also works with ...


3

Alternatives to cooking are also a possibility. Pickling, for example. Or fermentation, as practised by the Inuit and other Arctic tribes.


7

If you have clay, you can form it into a sheet and wrap the meat with it. You cover the thing with hot coals and wait. When it is ready you break the shell and retrieve the goods inside. Baking Meat In Clay Alternatively, if you have flour you can do the same but with dough. The dough will be burned to char, but the food inside will be protected by the ...


11

You can cook meat on a wooden skewer, piecing it like a kebab, and turning it frequently to prevent burning and to allow it to cook evenly. Similarly you can do this with two sticks and have the meat tied between the two. This is useful for smaller chunks, but becomes difficult with larger ones. You also will have to take care with dripping fat which can ...



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