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8

I don't have the time to give a truly complete answer here, but a good choice for you might be metal edged, waxless, backcountry cross-country skis. Other options might include: Snowshoes (which you don't like) Telemark or Alpine Touring skis (which are heavy, and downhill focused) Postholing (no fun) XC skis are far lighter than a telemark setup (~1.6kg, ...


7

Various anti-fog products will work. I actually use the Rain-X anti-fog fluid (I had it for the car anyway and tried it successfully) You just need to clean the inside thoroughly, then apply it and it should last an entire season.


7

By engaging in winter sports (where there is significant snow on the ground) you are already greatly reducing your impact. The biggest impacts to back-country areas from non-motorized recreation come from vegetation disturbance: boots grinding up plants and breaking topsoil, tents compressing vegetation, camp activity destroying vegetation, fire scars, etc. ...


6

I think those were the original 3-pin Nordic Norm bindings. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ski_binding#Cross_country: 75 mm (Rottefella, Nordic Norm, 3-pin) This is the original, classic system found on cross country skis, invented by Bror With. These bindings, once the standard, are no longer as popular as they were but still hold a significant ...


6

Ventilation is your friend. I hate to say it - but the glasses I've found that have this dialed are usually a little more expensive. After suffering through fog, wind sheer, and poor optics, I found a high end pair of glasses in the back-country, and my eyes were opened. As a second option, removing your glasses immediately when you stop (or even sliding ...


5

This is a fairly subjective thing, but I think you may be a good candidate for a pair of simple Telemark skis, configured in a ski touring fashion. The advantages for you: Telemark bindings fit nearly any alpine-style ski, so you have many options for length and width to fit your height and weight. Telemark setups are typically very lightweight, challenged ...


4

This question had two answers that unfortunately didn't survive the migration. I'll post what I've found, as well as one of the links from @Refineo's answer (the other link was a patent description). Here's a folding ski used to climb mountains, so not cross-country compatible: http://www.mtnapproach.com/ In addition to @Refineo's links, I was also able ...


3

Some non-tested ideas: Put rubbers/galoshas (or any other huge size boots) on your ski boots. Remove the soles of your previous ski boots (or any other of your old boots with good grip) and glue them to a spare pair of NNN bindings. Click off your skis, click on your anti slip soles. Use the method of rubbers with spikes, but skip spikes. Again, you can ...


3

You definitely need to be concerned if you are using waxless XC skis with fish scales under foot. Skiing over hard dead sticks can break off the edges of these scales (or wear them down over time) making them less effective on climbs. For smooth bottom skis, pine needles, roots, etc will likely do nothing more than scrape the wax off your skis (which if ...


3

Having snow stick to the bottom of touring or telemark skis after removing skins is a common occurrence. You can mitigate it by bringing some glide wax with your or by using a liquid or spray. I keep a little a glide wax that looks like underarm deodorant in the bottom of my avy pack just for this purpose.


2

I haven't found any. Collapsible poles are usually too short for the long stroke necessary in cross-country skiing, and probably wouldn't stand up well to hours of double polling. My current Black Diamond poles max out at 130cm, but that's too short for pretty much anyone over 150cm / 5' tall according to this cross-country ski pole sizing chart.


2

There is one often forgotten thing in skiing that can be harmful. The waxes. The racing ones contain a lot of fluorocarbons that can stay in the environment for ages. The pure racing fluorocarbons (mostly powders) are dangerous even to people applying them and special masks should be worn (see). Consider using just pure hydrocarbon waxes or other waxes ...


1

The only retail folding skis are from Mountain Approach, and they are touring skis with skins permanently attached, so are more of a snowshoe than a ski, and only really for going uphill in the back country (you fold them up when you summit and then snowboard down). As for short cross-country skis, there was a fad in the mid-late 90s when 145cm skis became ...


1

XC skis don't need to be broken in. Older skis may grip better because they are more scratched up, but they also won't glide as well as new ones. Wax doesn't seem to hurt waxless skis unless you put tons on so it fills in the cavities behind the scales.



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