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26

Until just a few years ago I would have said tweezers. I use a tick key these days because it removes without squeezing the tick. I get between three and a dozen ticks a year (they like me), and I much prefer this to the tweezers. The big downside with tweezers is that you are compressing the tick's body and thus forcing liquid out of the tick and... ...


19

Use tweezers, grip as near to the head as you can, and pull gently and evenly but firmly - it should come off cleanly. If it doesn't then be sure to remove the head rather than just leave it in there. Then clean the area with alcohol and be sure to keep an eye on it in case any rashes or other untoward symptoms appear. The likelihood of this depends on the ...


12

Gently and very slowly pull the tick out. Do not burn the tick. Do not twist the tick. Do not pour oil or alcohol on the tick. It is a living creature and as soon as you stress it out, it will start spitting and vomiting into your body.


10

If a tick has already attached to you, I'd reccommend seeking out some medical help, but since we're in the outdoors group, what are the chances of there being one nearby? :) You should: Pour a little bit of spirits on the tick. That should both disinfect the area and stun the bugger a bit. Make a little loop of cotton, and try to pull out the tick, ...


7

You should keep the bite site clean (make sure you got the whole tick out, and didn't leave the head behind, still in the skin). This is to avoid infection. Then, watch the area to look for a rash. The Lyme Disease rash generally (but not always) will have a bulls-eye pattern to it, with concentric circles of redness around the bite location. Some ...


6

It's vital to get them off ASAP as the risk of infection from Lyme Disease increases after the first 24 hours, but the list of ways NOT to do this is probably more important ;-) Don't burn it, squeeze it, twist it, or cover it in alcohol/wax/marmalade/whatever. And -contrary to the accepted answer- if at all possible, DO NOT use tweezers: you need extreme ...


5

There are several types and configurations of mosquito nets that you can use: ones that hang (from a single center point, or from four corners), ones that drape over your bag with one or two poles that go over your head to keep it off your face, full free-standing Depending on your situation, each has its advantages and disadvantages. Choosing a net: ...


5

I contracted ehrlichiosis a couple years ago. I got a few dozen ticks during a hike and didn't notice for a few hours until I was home and in shorts after a shower. Here's what I learned: No, it doesn't need to be attached for 24 hours in order to infect you. It took a full week for symptoms to show up, but when they did, it was sudden and extreme. I ...


4

Some important additional points about Lyme disease: Deer ticks in the nymph stage have a much higher chance of transmission. So if it's anywhere near as big as the one in the picture included with the question, there's a good chance right there not to worry. Nymphs are tiny. The tick must be attached for at least 24 hours typically before there's any ...


4

I've taken the liberty to bold 2 questions I believed where the main questions of your post. Are there animals that are simply not afraid of much bigger humans? Yes. A variety of animals have adapted to our societies/cities and have adapted, other species may have no other choice than to look for food near or in our ever expanding cities and towns. May it ...


4

To remove a tick that has attached to your skin: Use a pair of fine tipped tweezers and pull up evenly, i.e. with steady pressure. Don't twist or jerk, as this may leave body parts in the skin. If this happens, use the tweezers to pull them out. Also, don't forget to use rubbing/isopropyl alcohol to sterilize the tick site, as you want to make sure there ...


3

Typically a tent itself will not let mosquitos in, but if you are in a tent that will, like a canvas army tent, hanging nets does a decent job. In some situations a bivy may do better. Some are primarily made of netting and designed specifically for bugs, and some are even shaped to fit standard military cots. I have had some luck with fabric treatments. ...


3

I pull them off gently, and if their head detaches in my skin (rarely happens), I'll dig it out with a needle or tweezers. Then add neosporin, and occasionally look for oddly-shaped rashes. If you spray your socks with deet, it will help keep them off.


3

Put on neosporin and keep an eye on it for a few days looking for an oddly shaped rash. More info on Lime disease: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002296/ More info on Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: http://oklahomapoison.org/general/tick.asp More detailed tick first aid: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/first-aid-tick-bites/FA00062 I would ...



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