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13

I've helped a few friends make torches for medieval events they were hosting. As I was the only one who managed to burn themselves during assembly and testing, I feel somewhat informed, if a bit clumsy. Your choice of materials will depend on how long you want your torch to burn for, as well as how brightly. Specifically, your wick material and your fuel. ...


13

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


12

My other half used Tyvek when he was practicing Archery and one of the factors there was it had to be quiet, they used it for 4-6 hour stints to sit on. This is what he and some others in his club did: Wash it on a cotton / white cycle in your washing machine without any soap or detergent or powders. Wash it three times but let it dry thoroughly between ...


11

I was once shown a great way to protect the blade on a wood axe or hatchet. I realize that ice axes are a different shape than wood axes, so this may not be a perfect solution, but maybe it will give you an inspiration for something similar. Get an old garden hose. Cut a length of the hose about as long as the axe's blade. Cut an incision down the length ...


11

Stick hardwood 2 to 3ft long Wick (I guess that's suitable terminology) cotton rags Fuel lamp oil or in the context of a survival situation, animal fat.† Misc nails or fence staples Directions Soak the rags in the fuel Wrap the rags around the stick Fasten the rags to the stick with the nails, staples, or something similar. Apply fire ...


11

A paper bin is going to make a fairly small stopping area. Hopefully there is something more substantial (like a wall) behind the target that will stop the arrow if you happen to miss the target entirely. A couple of bales of hay make a larger area, small bales are relatively inexpensive and reliably stop arrows without damaging them. The best quality, ...


10

I have to say that "eating with" falls under the same rules as "eating". Don't go out in the woods and put something in your mouth unless you know exactly what you are dealing with. Many woods are toxic. Also remember that "wood" doesn't just come from trees, but all woody plants, which is why some shrubs are also listed here. Specifically avoid the ...


10

From what I've discovered there are really two main types of Tyvek: hard-structure and soft-structure. The numbers you refer to are variations in applications of the two types. Hard-structure, type 10, is most commonly recognizable in the housewrap application and is suitable for a ground cloth. It is stiff, noisy, and loud but that can be remedied. ...


10

What kind of shelter you can build will depend on what is around you at the time. If you are in a forest or woodland you will obviously have more to utilise than in a desert or moorland, but from my own experiences I've built shelters in British deciduous and coniferous woodlands. During Girl Guides (bit like Scouts) and school based Team Building weeks we ...


8

You could look at bungee cord hooks. They're pretty cheap and come in a bunch of sizes, plus you can bend and adjust them to suit your purpose. You can get them attached to bungee cord, as a length of cord or as a loop, or you can purchase them individually. Another option if you do want to use an antler is to check out pet shops, they tend to have loads ...


8

The simple answer is yes, you can definitely use waste paper or cardboard to stop an arrow. Various folks have used cardboard boxes, flattened, and piled up to anywhere between 6 and 12 inches thick, held together with straps or duct tape. You'd need to use trial and error to find out what thickness works for you - if you compress the cardboard tighter you ...


7

The clove hitch is probably what you're looking for. You can even tie it directly on the branch/beam/bar without worrying about adding a carabiner. You could also tie it to the carabiner, adjust the length, and clip the carabiner to something else. The clove hitch is one of the most under-utilized climbing knots out there. It's infinitely adjustable because ...


7

If it doesn't need to be pretty, a cost effective option is spinnaker repair tape (nylon cloth tape, for example, see products on this page). It is designed for repairs to yacht sails so it is durable, weatherproof and should survive a machine wash (but it wont be breathable). Stick a piece over the hole on the front and back of the fabric.


7

From my experience there are two good ways to do this depending on the weather conditions you expect to encounter. Place waterproof tarp outside tent Good for rain conditions or where rocks and debris can damage the tent floor. Purchase a good quality waterproof tarp slightly larger than tent footprint dimensions. When setting up the tent Fold edges ...


7

In some parts of France (Particularly the Fontainebleau forest) they use a substance called POF. POF is basically tree sap, they harvest it and carry it around in bags, dabbing it onto holds, etc. to make them sticky. Any tree that produces a lot of sap can be used. Though be careful not to overly damage the tree in the process. It is not without it's ...


7

A few years back at my University climbing gym, someone posted a study performed on chalking your hands while climbing. Basically, it was discovered that there was actually a measurable decrease in the coefficient of friction when you used chalk. As in, chalk made climbing holds harder to hang onto. This of course made all the climbers who read the abstract ...


7

There really is no good replacement for chalk but natural conditions and some tricks can help to make it easier to climb without chalk. Some areas in Germany have very strict (Elbsandstein - no chalk) or strict (Pfalz - chalk starting around 5.12) ethics concerning chalk and it might be a good idea to look at how climbers there deal with sweaty hands. ...


7

I usually sharp my crampons when I am expecting icy conditions, that means glare ice. Especially when you go steep and need front point technique, you need to rely on those points - all your bodys weight. If your front spikes are too coarse, you need much more energy to bring them secure and stable into the ice. Besides that, the ice will splinter and break ...


7

According to Will Gadd, you should sharpen your crampons and ice tools after every use. If you spend just a minute or two after each trip–sometimes you won't even need a minute, just give them a look over and a couple passes with the file to take off a couple burrs–then you're never going to have to worry about dull points. Regular maintenance also ensures ...


6

Gelled alcohol has problems even in its "native" setting of a Sterno can. Gelled alcohol burns at a lower temperature. A standard Sterno can take 20 minutes or longer to boil water and is typically more expensive than liquid alcohol fuel. Some good information on different fuel sources for alcohol stoves. Information on Sterno.


6

For most people, having a shop do the mount is a hassle-free and relatively inexpensive way to mount bindings. Shops will often mount the ski "on the line" but many will mount it to your basic specifications. Why mount yourself? In my experience, the main reason someone would choose to mount their own ski bindings is that they want to mount older but still ...


6

When I managed a climbing gym we got some resole kits so I thought I would give one a try. The result was not particularly good, but meant a pair of shoes that were totally trashed were at least wearable. The edges didn't bond particularly well, so there is not a very precise toe/edge. It is certainly nowhere near as good as if you get it done ...


6

Where I am from it costs $60CAN to get your climbing shoes Resoled by a professional. Alternatively, you can try yourself with a KIT that costs $35CAN. However this $35 does not include a knife, sandpaper or acetone to clean the shoe/rubber and does not account for labour, in other words your time taken to repair your shoes. Ultimately to me it seems to ...


6

For the spike, I usually just take a piece of corrugated cardboard, fold it to double the thickness, punch holes through it, and use some thin cord to tie it through the hole in the spike. This is low-tech and works if I lose my protector while traveling, which is what always happens. No matter where I am, it's always pretty easy to get some cardboard. For ...


6

Feed the strap through the remains of the buckle, or the fabric loop it was formerly attached to. Then tie the strap to itself using a rolling hitch. By sliding the rolling hitch up and down the strap, you will be able to alter its effective length.


6

You could make your own with a smaller piece of hardwood 1x4. With a jig or bandsaw, cut a notch out for the hook, then remove material along the outside to make it narrow. Guaranteed to be comfortable and sit flat in your pocket. Just draw the hook shape first so you know what it will look like and where to cut. You can even smooth it out with a rasp or ...


6

Apparently there are various grades of Mylar pouches (one of the companies I work with switched from bags from some Asian seller to a marginally more expensive North-American company because the first one did not have any explicit certification as food grade, even if they don't pack food in them). The difference apparently is in the composition of the inner ...


6

Yes. There are two common approaches to this: Press moistened paper into the target container, which can be a box of any sort. The paper should be wet enough and pressed hard enough that at least a little bit of water is squeezed out upon pressing. You don't have to wait for it to dry to shoot it. The advantage of pressing wet paper hard is that you ...


5

Gear manufacturer's generally purchase the down (waterproofed or not) from suppliers. There are several water resistant down products, but they all work withing a small range of results with the same basic tech Things to know: It's water resistant not water proof. For jackets this means you can probably withstand sweat and a light shower, but not a ...


5

This is in the category with swimming pools, and trampolines, and jungle gyms. There is no way to be completely safe and still have it fun. Keep it close to the ground. This may mean getting a dozer in to shape the hill. Make for a soft landing. A foot of sawdust or sand. Fluff it up with a rototiller now and then. Double or triple pulley. Don't want ...



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