Hot answers tagged

13

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


13

I've helped a few friends make torches for medieval events they were hosting. As I was the only one who managed to burn themselves during assembly and testing, I feel somewhat informed, if a bit clumsy. Your choice of materials will depend on how long you want your torch to burn for, as well as how brightly. Specifically, your wick material and your fuel. ...


11

Stick hardwood 2 to 3ft long Wick (I guess that's suitable terminology) cotton rags Fuel lamp oil or in the context of a survival situation, animal fat.† Misc nails or fence staples Directions Soak the rags in the fuel Wrap the rags around the stick Fasten the rags to the stick with the nails, staples, or something similar. Apply fire ...


8

You could look at bungee cord hooks. They're pretty cheap and come in a bunch of sizes, plus you can bend and adjust them to suit your purpose. You can get them attached to bungee cord, as a length of cord or as a loop, or you can purchase them individually. Another option if you do want to use an antler is to check out pet shops, they tend to have loads ...


7

There really is no good replacement for chalk but natural conditions and some tricks can help to make it easier to climb without chalk. Some areas in Germany have very strict (Elbsandstein - no chalk) or strict (Pfalz - chalk starting around 5.12) ethics concerning chalk and it might be a good idea to look at how climbers there deal with sweaty hands. ...


7

A few years back at my University climbing gym, someone posted a study performed on chalking your hands while climbing. Basically, it was discovered that there was actually a measurable decrease in the coefficient of friction when you used chalk. As in, chalk made climbing holds harder to hang onto. This of course made all the climbers who read the abstract ...


7

In some parts of France (Particularly the Fontainebleau forest) they use a substance called POF. POF is basically tree sap, they harvest it and carry it around in bags, dabbing it onto holds, etc. to make them sticky. Any tree that produces a lot of sap can be used. Though be careful not to overly damage the tree in the process. It is not without it's ...


6

Apparently there are various grades of Mylar pouches (one of the companies I work with switched from bags from some Asian seller to a marginally more expensive North-American company because the first one did not have any explicit certification as food grade, even if they don't pack food in them). The difference apparently is in the composition of the inner ...


6

You could make your own with a smaller piece of hardwood 1x4. With a jig or bandsaw, cut a notch out for the hook, then remove material along the outside to make it narrow. Guaranteed to be comfortable and sit flat in your pocket. Just draw the hook shape first so you know what it will look like and where to cut. You can even smooth it out with a rasp or ...


6

Feed the strap through the remains of the buckle, or the fabric loop it was formerly attached to. Then tie the strap to itself using a rolling hitch. By sliding the rolling hitch up and down the strap, you will be able to alter its effective length.


5

It looks like the webbing for the sternum strap is similar size to the webbing for the shoulder strap. In this pack you could unthread the left side of the sternum strap buckle (keeping the snap buckle), then thread in webbing that was attached to the broken buckle. This is a quick, easy repair that won't require any extra parts. As a bonus you can use ...


5

The only knot that's I'm aware of that's any good at securing straps like that is a water knot. though I'm not convinced it's going to work in your case. You don't have a lot of slack, it tends to slip and it's not very adjustable. A better solution to your problem I think might be to change how your backpack works. Remove the strap that works from the ...


3

Carry a spare Things break. If you're expecting to be far enough for long enough, it helps to be able to repair your gear. In addition to needle and thread, I have in my rucksack a half-meter of webbing with two different spare buckles on it, it takes very little space, weight and money but has saved me a lot of pain a few times already.


3

Depends somewhat on what type of absorber you're using, but they're most commonly made from iron powder, which are good for hours between first opening and sealing in your bags, but that time can be extended to days, weeks or longer if you keep the unused ones in an airtight container like a jar, or some other container with a rubber seal. Oxygen absorbers ...


3

This may not be an exact answer but I figured I would share it just in case you hadn't seen it. They say 10 to 15 minutes is the window you have to get them in the Mylar and seal it. From Backdoorsurvival.com : The most important precaution is to limit the exposure of unused packets to air. Take out only what you are going to use in the next 15 ...


3

I just buy these things in bulk at the dollar store: I call them my, "hang anything from anywhere" hooks. Not really though, they're just a double hook, and I find them really handy. Almost as handy as my "S" caribiners:


3

Being a sailor rather than a rock climber, my familiarity is more with nylon 3 strand twisted ropes. With nylon twisted ropes, you can make ropes of any length without needing special splicing tools like you need for cored ropes like those used in climbing. I would buy 3/8 inch deck and anchor line, cut your favorite clasp off your preferred leash, and ...


3

I'm wondering if it would be possible make him a thicker long line with a decent clasp? For the clasp, any climbing karabiner will be strong enough to hang a car off; I'd suggest a screwgate to avoid accidental un-clipping. Other clips and clasps may be perfectly fine too, these are just the ones I'm familiar with and have around the house! If I ...


3

I wouldn't use climbing rope, anyone that's ever caught a climbing rope that's running out will tell you it's not pleasant. It burns! Very painful. A lunge line would be much better. It should easily cope with the demands of rocks, etc. Climbing ropes are engineered to catch a falling human. Dogs are obviously much lighter and will typically not be having ...


3

The original Penny Stove has been popular for over a decade as a DIY alcohol stove designed for ultralight backpackers. Its trademark is the use of a penny as a fuel regulator. Independent tests document that it heats faster, uses less fuel, simmers longer, and packs lighter than any commercial alcohol stove. The 2.0 version achieves the same ...


3

If you are not specifically looking for a liquid fuel thing: I always fantasized about making one such thing. But I have never tried. Get a tin Make something that looks like below. Advantages: Tins are easy to find and so are those solid fuel tablets If you break it, worst case you will be at loss of money worth a burger and time worth an afternoon ...


2

Print your faces and stick on cardboard. They last a lot longer. Waterproof paper might help if you're planning to shoot in not so fair weather.


2

I haven't tried this personally but I would imagine that waterproof/resistant paper used for printing out maps would work well due the slightly plastic feel. A quick search using your favorite search engine with the terms 'waterproof inkjet paper' ought to give you lots of options.


2

Feathers take dye well. Some references suggest that kool-aid can be used. You can use an off the shelf fabric dye. If you want to go natural you could use turkey droppings, and thin to get a consistency that gives the desired color. Regardless of which type of dye you use it will take trial and error to get the correct mix to give the desired color. ...


2

Typically these are not meant to be messed with. Even if you could get to the knot I'd imagine you would struggle to get it un-done. Basically, in my experience, cutting it is often the best/only solution. Just try and save as much cord as you can. FYI tent pole repair companies will often sell extra cord should you need it.


1

Tie it together with two (2) bits of 5mm accessory cord (right size for general camp use, bear bags, BDSM games at home, etc.) or light weight climbing nylon tubing.. Light weight tubular webbing (like you would use for climbing, esp. winter climbing, maybe 5/8") can also be sewn to anything/anyone with dental floss and the awl of a Swiss Army knife, and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible