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12

I've helped a few friends make torches for medieval events they were hosting. As I was the only one who managed to burn themselves during assembly and testing, I feel somewhat informed, if a bit clumsy. Your choice of materials will depend on how long you want your torch to burn for, as well as how brightly. Specifically, your wick material and your fuel. ...


11

Stick hardwood 2 to 3ft long Wick (I guess that's suitable terminology) cotton rags Fuel lamp oil or in the context of a survival situation, animal fat.† Misc nails or fence staples Directions Soak the rags in the fuel Wrap the rags around the stick Fasten the rags to the stick with the nails, staples, or something similar. Apply fire ...


11

I was once shown a great way to protect the blade on a wood axe or hatchet. I realize that ice axes are a different shape than wood axes, so this may not be a perfect solution, but maybe it will give you an inspiration for something similar. Get an old garden hose. Cut a length of the hose about as long as the axe's blade. Cut an incision down the length ...


6

For the spike, I usually just take a piece of corrugated cardboard, fold it to double the thickness, punch holes through it, and use some thin cord to tie it through the hole in the spike. This is low-tech and works if I lose my protector while traveling, which is what always happens. No matter where I am, it's always pretty easy to get some cardboard. For ...


5

I have several suggestions of how you could do this. If you are going to use rope I would use 3 pieces of thinner rope 2/3mm paracord should be more than strong enough. I would then tie a shear lashing (see picture) on each leg. You want to try and use a significant length of the pole or possible even tie to lashings per pole to reduce the amount of ...


4

I can think of the following two ways to cover the blade: You can use something like a Bike Handle cover, the one that has a cap on the other end. You can get it of the size that your fits in. I assume that the main blade will be a bit hard to fit in, but then you can always give a try towards getting the handle cover which is a bit flexible(probably made ...


4

Using a hanger worked great. The clips I made replaced the slider legs of the mini-tripod, and the other end engaged the tent pole sleeves. I bent up a pressure clip so they would not slide out. I can even move my ultra-light tripod around and it stays together. See pictures below. Set Up Close Up How Mounted Bottom View Notice the pressure clip ...


3

What came to my mind when I read WedaPashi's answer about bicycle handles was the use of old bicycle tubes to build some sheath. The rubber of the tube is flexible but it's not too easy to perforate it, therefore you can build your sheath rather close-fitting. Also you can glue it easily with bicycle patch glue.


3

Many printer drivers and other software allow you to "tile" a large document or a magnified one on multiple pages. You can usually specify the overlap between pages, which only needs to be enough for you to cut cleanly. 0.1 inch is usually good enough. Acrobat reader may even have such a option. I know I've done this a few times with my printer, a ...


3

Most applications will let you minimise your margins, which reduces waste, then all you do is cut the margin off one page, and then stick that page over the other one, which gives you a solid connection - adhesive tape front and back.


2

I use pneumatic hosing, something like this: http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-plastic-and-rubber-tubing/=uowues It's super cheap (runs under a dollar/foot and a foot is more than you will need) and you can buy as short of a section you want at most hardware stores.



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