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15

I regularly backpack overnight with two dogs (one is a great dane / lab mix) in the US. A tired dog is a good dog. I have an advantage of several miles of hiking in, but you can still tire the dog out when you get there. A frisbee (flying disc) and swimming works well for my big guy (the lab mix), my smaller girl is tired from the hike itself. Whatever ...


10

The breed of dog will make a difference, but most "backpacking" dogs will do just fine in the open or under the tarp with you. A dog's metabolism works differently than humans, and they generate a lot more body heat. Consider sled dogs that stick their nose under their tail and sleep through a driving blizzard (and sled dogs usually aren't the thick-fur ...


8

There's a decent thread discussing this issue over at BPL. Based on that and similar discussions, my suggestions would be as follows: Cover the floor of the tent with a tarp or similar material. While the flooring will probably be fine, this will provide additional protection (and simplify cleanup if there's mud involved). (When wild camping you can ...


6

Somehow, I can't see a Corgi keeping up. I have a 20-pound terrier mutt. She does great with me trail running at distances of 6-7 miles. After we get home, she runs around the back yard in circles like a rocket. Dogs are just much more efficient runners than humans, especially in cool weather. As far as I can tell, humans only seem to be at all ...


5

Australian cattle dog or other types of working dogs. Mine loves backpacking. Cattle dogs have very high energy levels and are bred to travel long distances. Excellent for trail running and hiking long distances. They can carry their own food/water and will do so without whining or stopping (working mentality). They have a very active mind and are very ...


4

I regularly take my two medium-sized dogs car camping and keep them inside the tent with me. I initially took them on a practice trip to a nearby park and let them sleep in the tent with me. The dogs tore holes in the mesh because they kept trying to go after animals. We learned two lessons: Dogs that can see out want to get out. We put the rain fly on and ...


2

You could think through some of the possible problems based on your knowledge of the area: roads with fast traffic; cattle that could hurt the dog; livestock such as chickens that the dog could kill; other dogs that live there and would be defending their territory. If none of these seems like a real issue, then I would just let the dog roam freely around ...


2

The wolf, the wild ancestor of the dog, has extreme running endurance. According to this article, many wolfs travel more than 50 miles daily searching for food. I've read somewhere, that wolfs can chase moose for a few days, but I can't find that now. Wolf is very similar to us in that domain, human hunters can also run for days. This can be another reason ...


1

Baby sling may be a much better option, because it weights less and is easier to pack when not used. It would be also easier to adapt to the size of the dog, and with a bit of skill, you can make it yourself from a bit of an old sheet or something similar.


1

Also using paw ointment, could help to reduce the problem, preventing ice/snow to build up and also helps with problems with salted roads and minor blisters Example:http://www.non-stopdogwear.no/eng/Our-products/Care-line/Non-stop-Paw-Ointment


1

I know this is an old thread, but... Live in the Ozark National Forest. Specifically where the game office drop off bears that are written off as "trouble makes" caught near residences. Last March I was charged by a rather large, male, black bear...the only thing that saved my bacon was a dog named Doo. Not "Scooby-Doo", but "Doo". Then there are the dozen ...



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