Hot answers tagged

17

They protect the paws from injury or already injured paws from getting worse (and having bandages ripped off). Things they protect from include: rough terrain - sharp rocks, etc. chemicals like salt used for de-icing roads extreme cold ice balls forming between the dog's toes.


15

I think the biggest issue here is that you're likely to find strays won't respond to commands that, for a normal dog, would work at keeping them from following (stay or wait). I've actually had this experience as well when walking along a canal with my husband, a narrow boat owners dog followed us for a good 200 yards before we walked him back and got them ...


12

These boots are designed for a few purposes actually. Firstly, dogs paws can be affected by snow and ice - especially in breeds or dogs unused to colder climates. The boots help protect their paws from the colder temperatures, and also help prevent the build up of snow on their paw hair - which can then clump and freeze and cause irritation for the dog. ...


11

I actually answered a similar question over on Pets not long ago... Warm weather walkies and water... however you've asked in a bit more detail so here goes... How can I know that the dog is perfectly hydrated? The dog will refuse water given to them if they feel like they've had enough to drink - this is a slim balance especially in male dogs, as it's ...


10

One very helpful thing is to brush him while you're towel drying. The brushing will help separate the hair to keep it from matting and will allow more air drying to occur. Also, if you use chamois leather to dry him off initially it will keep you from soaking a towel right away. The chamois will absorb a lot of water, but is easily wrung out to absorb ...


10

They are often basically the same but there are often three additional items listed: tick tweezers louse-comb foldable cone (to be preferred), muzzle or strips of cloth to prevent biting (its wounds etc.) Especially the tick tweezers seems to be pretty useful of course. Other pet-specific supplies to assume Pet first-aid book Phone numbers: ...


7

There is a rule of thumb here that our dog trainer taught us which is, if you cannot hold your hand on the ground for more than 5 seconds, pavement, dirt etc, it is too hot for your dog to be walking on or be out in. This can be taken with a pinch of salt if you are for example at a beach, the sand maybe too hot but the access to vast amounts of water to ...


7

Dehydration in dogs is very similar to dehydration in humans. This link should give you an in depth answer. My main points are these: If the dog has a dry nose, dry gums and/or dry mouth it most likely needs water. Excessive panting is another big sign to look for seeing as that's how dogs regulate their body temperature. You should treat their dehydration ...


6

If you are backpacking or trying to travel light, bring a separate tent for the dog. There are lots of small tents built with this in mind. Even a small tarp will do the trick, if you aren't worried about bugs. A patch of grass under the tarp will make him perfectly happy. (You'll need to use a tie-out if you go with a tarp, of course.) For car camping, we ...


6

You can't teach an old dog new tricks. Hunting dogs are trained from pups, you wouldn't necessarily confuse your dog, but you might discover that it doesn't do the best job of what you want it to do (rips your birds apart while retrieving them, isn't fast enough to catch rabbits and foxes, leads you to a steaming pile of poop instead of following a blood ...


6

Depending on the size of your dog you should also consider getting some larger bandages - A Labrador is very large around compared to a human leg. Also I would suggest some plastic bags - They can be used in conjunction with the self cling bandages over a leg, foot or tail wound. Also, as in a human, for penetrating or sucking wounds. Something for stings ...


5

To add a little to the excellent answers already present: another way to tell dehydration in a dog is to (gently!) grab the scruff of its neck, raise the skin a bit and let go. If it returns back to its normal position and smooth shape quickly, it's fine. If it stays wrinkled/deformed or only resumes its original shape slowly, the dog is likely dehydrated.


5

As far as I can tell dog life jackets do not have different ratings as for human life jackets. All the models I have seen in a brief search seem designed for the situation where your dog is conscious, can keep themselves afloat, relatively to land and therefore assistance if needed. Additionally, I suspect due to dog life jackets being a relatively niche ...


4

NSTs do not have a uniform set of rules. That said for the major trails, there are good websites that can answer many of your questions. The ATC website says that dogs are NOT allowed in 3 areas: Baxter State Park in Maine, Great Smoky mountains National Park in Tennessee, and Bear Mountain State Park in New York. There is an alternate road walk for the ...


4

No. They can be on the vast majority of each trail, but in most cases the land agencies along the way still have their own rules, and many National Parks (and some state parks) forbid pets on trails. You would have to either bypass those areas or arrange for your pet to be transported to the other end of each.


4

I just looked at a typical UK "Pet First Aid Kit" here. http://www.petsathome.com/shop/en/pets/dog/dog-healthcare/dog-first-aid/first-aid-box-for-pets Contents are... Each pack contains 24 pieces all designed with the care of your pet in mind, including: 2 x 20ml Pods of Saline - to wash away dirt and debris from your pet's eyes and other ...


4

It depends on the dog. Dogs have far superior senses to humans, which is why dogs became man's best friend, it was mutually beneficial for us to coexist. Early man gave docile wolves their scraps from their kills, and in return, the domesticated wolves provided man with an early warning system against predators and other enemies. Protection from large ...


4

What your doggie needs is a Swamp Cooler Vest. It's basically a wet vest that acts as a refrigerator and cools your dog by reflecting the suns rays off it's back while also stripping away the heat through a natural evaporative process.


4

For part one, there are two aspects to consider: one is the regular old hit to the cardiovascular system that makes you tired more quickly because the air is thinner. This will affect you and your dog pretty much equally. However, many dogs will run until they are totally exhausted whenever there is adventure involved, so this aspect at worst it will just ...


3

What always worked for me, when I used to live in a place where stray dogs were common, was to slow down, crouch, and reach down, pretending to pick up a rock to throw at them. Stray dogs are usually dumb enough to fall for this, even on a blacktop road with no rocks in sight! They'll go running. Immediately stand up and keep walking. (Walk, don't run.) ...


3

Being a sailor rather than a rock climber, my familiarity is more with nylon 3 strand twisted ropes. With nylon twisted ropes, you can make ropes of any length without needing special splicing tools like you need for cored ropes like those used in climbing. I would buy 3/8 inch deck and anchor line, cut your favorite clasp off your preferred leash, and ...


3

I'm wondering if it would be possible make him a thicker long line with a decent clasp? For the clasp, any climbing karabiner will be strong enough to hang a car off; I'd suggest a screwgate to avoid accidental un-clipping. Other clips and clasps may be perfectly fine too, these are just the ones I'm familiar with and have around the house! If I ...


3

I wouldn't use climbing rope, anyone that's ever caught a climbing rope that's running out will tell you it's not pleasant. It burns! Very painful. A lunge line would be much better. It should easily cope with the demands of rocks, etc. Climbing ropes are engineered to catch a falling human. Dogs are obviously much lighter and will typically not be having ...


3

I camp regularly with my black labrador in the UK. I have an old sleeping bag I use for her, it has her smell and she can curl up in it if it gets cold. She sleeps in the sleeping compartment. I tend to find there isn't an issue when she is in the tent, as others have said if you walk a few miles and tire them out then they don't tend to misbehave in the ...



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