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16

I regularly backpack overnight with two dogs (one is a great dane / lab mix) in the US. A tired dog is a good dog. I have an advantage of several miles of hiking in, but you can still tire the dog out when you get there. A frisbee (flying disc) and swimming works well for my big guy (the lab mix), my smaller girl is tired from the hike itself. Whatever ...


8

There's a decent thread discussing this issue over at BPL. Based on that and similar discussions, my suggestions would be as follows: Cover the floor of the tent with a tarp or similar material. While the flooring will probably be fine, this will provide additional protection (and simplify cleanup if there's mud involved). (When wild camping you can ...


6

Australian cattle dog or other types of working dogs. Mine loves backpacking. Cattle dogs have very high energy levels and are bred to travel long distances. Excellent for trail running and hiking long distances. They can carry their own food/water and will do so without whining or stopping (working mentality). They have a very active mind and are very ...


4

I regularly take my two medium-sized dogs car camping and keep them inside the tent with me. I initially took them on a practice trip to a nearby park and let them sleep in the tent with me. The dogs tore holes in the mesh because they kept trying to go after animals. We learned two lessons: Dogs that can see out want to get out. We put the rain fly on and ...


4

I'd need to know a bit more about your winter hiking conditions and duration. If you're erring on the side of active, I'd suggest a Labrador. If you're doing colder and shorter, something like a Bernesse Mountain Dog would do amazing. I love running with my Labrador since she can handle heat decently (I don't run with her when it's very hot), she's handle ...


2

You could think through some of the possible problems based on your knowledge of the area: roads with fast traffic; cattle that could hurt the dog; livestock such as chickens that the dog could kill; other dogs that live there and would be defending their territory. If none of these seems like a real issue, then I would just let the dog roam freely around ...


1

Honestly. I think this should have been addressed with your friends and/or the campsite/resort. If you know all this and the 2 dogs get along then, take your dog. The worse that will happen is that your, or both, dogs will have to be leashed. I honestly don't see how this should be a community question because every campground, resort, or just someone's ...


1

Well, if one dog has to be tied up and they are worried about them being too boisterous, why not have yours tied up? In most campsites in England (I know it is different where you are) dogs have to be on leads and tied up at all times. If you plan on future trips with your friends, eventually she will have to go. If you follow the always on a lead rule to ...


1

Leaving a dog alone in an apartment for this length of time would be neglectful, even if you were able to provide enough food and water. Your girlfriend's logic doesn't make sense to me. Just having your dog there doesn't imply that the other dog has to be tied up. I would bring a long rope for your own dog and evaluate the situation once you get there in ...


1

Also using paw ointment, could help to reduce the problem, preventing ice/snow to build up and also helps with problems with salted roads and minor blisters Example:http://www.non-stopdogwear.no/eng/Our-products/Care-line/Non-stop-Paw-Ointment


1

I know this is an old thread, but... Live in the Ozark National Forest. Specifically where the game office drop off bears that are written off as "trouble makes" caught near residences. Last March I was charged by a rather large, male, black bear...the only thing that saved my bacon was a dog named Doo. Not "Scooby-Doo", but "Doo". Then there are the dozen ...



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