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11

There is a great Mountain Rescue in Poland, called GOPR ("Górskie Ochotnicze Pogotowie Ratunkowe" - "Mountain Volunteer Search and Rescue"). They cover all the mountain regions of Poland and in case of emergency you can reach them calling free rescue number: +48 601100300. There is even a smartphone app you can use to call help called "Ratunek" (https://play....


8

Depends where the hole is and how big it is, but: 1. First, determine if it's neccessary to try and patch the hole in open water. If you're close to shore, then go ashore and patch it there. If you're losing air faster than you could get back to shore, then you need to act quick. 2. Locate the the hole.If you can't find the hole, then you can't stop the ...


6

I agree that good quality para cord (look for 550 cord from a reputable supplier) is the best general purpose solution. It is strong enough that you could just about abseil off it with nothing else than a couple of carabiners in an absolute life or death situation or use it as a safety line for crossing a river or lowering your pack over a steep incline or ...


3

Yes & no. The U.S. Navy land survival training in Pensacola, Florida teaches students to chew on pine needles to obtain vitamin C. But you don't actually chew and swallow them.


3

I tend to treat emergency first aid and everyday 'maintenance' as separate requirements and I think that this helps to keep things rationalised and logical. The everyday kit is aimed at treating the normal problems you might get over a few days: this fits in a small wallet for short trips. A lot of these things are personal preference and what you find ...


2

I may be biased as a mariner, but I am partial to three stranded twisted rope. It may not be as strong as braided-cored ropes per thickness, but I can do more with it. With three stranded twisted rope, I can indefinately join pieces together permanently without any special tools. So I can make a continuous and very long rope if necessary that can still run ...


2

A couple of additional points which I think have not yet got the attention they deserve. Time is of the essence. I've once seen a report that stated that the average swimmer can make it about 50 meters max in 4°C water before drowning. That is not a lot! Meaning, that if the person in distress cannot hold on to something which helps them stay afloat you ...


2

In bushcraft and survival there are a range of tasks which a bladed tool can be used for. In the context of woodcraft and survival you are likely to be a lot more interested in making tools and implements, preparing wild food and game and generally extracting resources from your environment than in normal camping or trekking so basic and general purpose ...


1

Being at fault has nothing to do with the decision. If you are in trouble and cannot extricate yourself without risk to life or making your injuries more serious, you push the button, cost be dammed.


1

The first thing is to think very hard about whether you really need to cross it, in most circumstances the answer will be NO so there needs to be a strong reason to do so. DO NOT cross a river just because you are travelling in a straight line and the river is in the way. A river is a good source of water and, food and materials and they are an excellent ...



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