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13

I'd give them whatever my device or map provided me, and let them convert to whatever their devices or maps use. Anyone used to receiving lat/lon coordinates regularly should be able to convert from various formats to whatever they use internally. You're the one in trouble with limited resources. You're out there with a broken leg, lost, in the cold or ...


8

Almost every emergency dispatch center has a non-emergency phone number. While services like Skype and Google Voice can't call 911 directly, you can look up "<region> non-emergency dispatch" and get a number with a local area code. Call them and tell them this is an emergency but you couldn't access 911. They will transfer you to an emergency ...


8

It sounds like what you want is a personal locator beacon (PLB). They cost about $250, and there is zero cost after you buy it. It's not a phone. It's just a beacon that broadcasts your position so that a search and rescue team can come and rescue you. They're small and lightweight. Some people use a device such as a SPOT instead. IMO the SPOT is more of an ...


7

I would recommend UTM coordinates; it avoids the formatting uncertainty of lat/long and is better suited for ground operations. (Easy to translate to paper maps, define search areas, and calculate distances.) If you use the WGS84 datum, the numerical portions are also identical with the military grid reference system (MGRS) and the national grid (USNG). ...


7

I am by no means an authority on lightning in any way. With that said, however, I have had my share of getting caught climbing in a thunderstorm, and have since tried to do some reading on the subject. The biggest hurdle to surmount here is that most lightning safety advice revolves around seeking shelter, which is often not a viable option midway up a ...


6

All 4 major carriers have either implemented or are implementing text-to-911 service. U.S. mobile providers commit to emergency texting service In the event that this doesn't work, you can always text a friend or family member. They can then call 911 for you. If they are in a different area, then they will be transferred to the correct area.


5

If something goes wrong, the information you provide your emergency contact will be the starting point for the information Search and Rescue groups use to look for you. Much of this information will remain the same for multiple trips and some will be trip-specific. The items I list won't be comprehensive, but rather a selection of items from an online ...


5

Bivying used to be regarded as a desperate act that you'd do in an emergency. In these circumstances a large polythene bag would serve as a make do shelter. Very cheap simple and pretty awful. In more recent years bivying has become more widespread in the outdoor adventure arena and purpose built kit is now available. A comfortable bivy is a fine art that ...


4

If you are going to alpine area, your most important concern has to be security. Even with best equipment, knowledge about the dangers and how to avoid them is far more important. As you specifically asked for equipment, I will address these points. The only way I know of to spend a cold winter night comfortable is in some sort of a snow cave. There are ...


3

These two you mentioned are very important. Expected departure and return Date & time to consider overdue Just saying what time you're expected back isn't enough. If I'm going in an area that has any level of danger, I tell people when I expect to make contact, and when to call 911.


3

Obviously, the more specific you can be about what route you'll actually be taking the better, but the most important detail is nailing down the trailhead or launch point you're going to begin your trip from. This usually establishes a good starting point to work from in any kind of emergency. You should establish the time that you expect to return, your ...


3

Obviously, this is a scenario that could be avoided with proper planning and better practices. The best solutions would have been preemptive. Regardless, this scenario is where my question is to be asked from. (...) Assuming a normal load out (normal clothing, some water, a knife, etc.), what do you do to survive and make it back to a safe place? ...


3

I would use a simple emergency bivy bag, a butt-pad (short sleeping pad) (termarest, exped), some extra socks, buff and then you can sleep in all your clothes on the pad in this bag. this should work for emergency, it's not the best comfort but it works in 3 season conditions. For more comfort you can use a light silk liner in your bivy bag. all this ...


2

Always have a water proof map of the area you're traveling in ( one with coordinates on each side if you can help it ), and a compass you can use to triangulate your position with. You'll be better prepared in an emergency and more confident outdoors in general if you practice triangulating your position until it comes naturally: ...


2

If you have a VoIP-account and are able to use it from your mobile-phone you should be able to use it for calling emergency service. Note that with VoIP I donĀ“t mean Skype but a real SIP). You can find out about this contacting your VoIP-service provider. If you are staying some time in the same area it can be worth calling directly at the local hospital or ...


2

It's risk management. The best way to handle a storm is to get down before it starts. Check the weather and be down by noon or whenever the weather normally gets genned up. If you're in a thunderstorm and you're very high, it is probably more dangerous to rush a technical descent than to wait out the storm or continue climbing (up or down) normally. Don't ...


1

At the very least, you'll want some type of plastic bottle. You can cut the end off of your plastic bottle and layer in ground ( smashed ) charcoal from your camp fire along with cotton, sand, grass, most anything you can get your hands on to filter out the different sized particles. Charcoal being the most likely to weed out micro organisms. ...


1

Orient yourself to the situation. Admit that you're injured and lost, but stay calm. Don't fool yourself into feeling invincible, but recognize that you are in fact strong enough to survive. If your current location and situation is a source of danger, immediately move to a safe location. It's better to be alive and lost than dead and not lost. Stabilize ...


1

in general trekking (hiking) is not very common in RSA and most of the possibilities will be maintained by the MCSA. I recommend that you get in contact with the Cape Town section of the MCSA and ask about longer hiking trips. Generally you have to consider that most land in RSA is private property and owners may not allow trespassing. But if the MCSA tells ...



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