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13

In all likelihood, you just need to replace the helmet. Nearly all helmets, climbing and bicycle helmets included, need to be replaced once they become worn or older than 5 years. Ideally, you would track the age of each helmet. If you don't know how old one is and it looks well used, I wouldn't risk it. Stick to gently wiping it with a soft dry cloth. ...


11

Collapse them down, sandwich them with the points facing each inwards, and wrap the straps around them. You can then use a "real" crampon bag to hold them, or improvise. Some ideas for packaging them include: Cut the top off a 2 liter soda bottle (use two bottles for full containment). Make or buy a heavy (e.g. 500D) cordura nylon bag. Cut off an old ...


11

I'll caveat this with -- I've never vomited in my gear, nor do I know anyone who has. But I did sit and figure out how I'd try to solve this if it happened to me. Dry the liquid. This will depend on gear and season. Sunshine, freezing cold, or dirt can all work for this. Even cooking materials such as flour can work. Anything to make it less liquid. ...


9

The Problem with metallic equipment and cold temperatures is that your hands are moist, if you touch a very cold metallic surface (or any other smooth surface), your moisture will freeze to the surface which causes the top layer of your skin to get stuck on the surface. For Example: it's freezing cold outside and you put your tongue (which is very moist, ...


8

You are right about using the rough side first and then some polishing with the finer side. Holding an angle is a real tricky part and needs some stability and skill. To prevent the blade from getting damaged, you can run an ink marker over the cutting bevel. This way you'll have a reference to manage the amount of tilt you need to have. The typical angle ...


8

Push the torn area up to the mouth and apply a bike tire patch to it from the inside (make sure it's dry). Then apply another patch from the outside. Where the two patches bond together will form a plug that should stand up better to water than a single patch.


7

My boots are leather, as you've not stated what yours are made of at time of writing, here goes with what I do to clean my boots on walks and to store at home. Firstly for at home I will always leave my boots to dry off usually overnight - just on some newspaper away from any radiators or the fire, slow drying as they are leather. It's easier to remove dry ...


6

You will always find climbers saying they want 100% safety for their hobby. That's a bit like the mountaineers trying to go on ski tour or doing alpine tours only if there is literally no avalanche risk, no risk of stone fall, no chance to get bad weather and so on. It is impossible to get these bulletproof safety margins. You aren't 100% safe if you go in ...


6

You could try something like Shoe Goo or similar. Just dab on a small amount to seal the hole and ensure it doesn't stick to the opposite side of the hydration pack internally be keeping the sides separated until the Shoe Goo has dried. I repaired a small hole in a waterproof Ortlieb bag quite a few years ago and it is still holding up as a repair.


6

My advice is to always use the entire length of the the stone, to make sure wearing is even, and it's easier to be slow and steady. Also, some good information on cooking.SE. How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a ...


5

The conductive property of the material is a critical part of this phenomenon. It would be safe to handle many plastics at very low temperatures because energy from your hand (and the moisture on it) isn't readily conducted away, and the energy that is, takes a while to dissipate into the rest of the material so the point of contact retains the transferred ...


5

The go to shoe repair glue I've always used is Shoe Goo. I've used it mostly for when my soles started to separate from my uppers, and it's always done the job for me. As far as resoling your shoes, you're right in your suspicion that the "easy solution" doesn't last, Shoe Goo advertises that it can be used to rebuild worn soles, and it will for minor ...


5

It looks like the waterproof coating is flaking off. Try washing with a cloth and warm soap and water. I've had reasonable success with this method in the past.


4

Salt, sand and moisture are a bad combo for anything and everything. The salty sea air will wreak havoc on all your gear over time. You won't have to worry about it too much just for occasional use, but I would recommend at least rinsing your tent with fresh water before storing it away. There are impregnatng agents and cleaners that you can buy that are ...


4

I am not exactly the guy who have been doing that year by year, but I have some thoughts about cleaning and packing the gear after a high altitude expedition. I think some of it can be applied to your scenario. I would first soap-wash (if recommended) the gear so that there is no dirt. Dirt, deposited and remained there over the longer period time can ...


4

It all depends on the bow. I'll run through the three most common. For a recurve. Never left strung and detach the limbs. My personal superstition is make sure the top and bottom bolts always go in the same locations, but this isn't proven to make any difference. Make sure it is kept in a dry place. You can get some nice padded boxes to store them in. When ...


4

They are user replaceable, in fact some manufacturers recommend replacing slings every 2-5 years if they're very frequently used, but they're only user replaceable if you know how to sew structural climbing gear and have the equipment to bartack a loop of SuperTape or 10mm Dynex. The simplest thing to do is simply replace the worn sling with 1" tube ...


3

It is possible to clean/repair your bag if it's not too far gone, but buying a new one will be easier, might even be cheaper, and will certainly be better. Options for cleaning slightly mildewy bags include using vinegar or bleach (bleach will likely discolour the bag) and hot water in the wash cycle. If washing the bag and tumble drying doesn't get rid ...


3

I wouldn't label this as a "myth" tout court because it may depend on the very single piece of gear, I mean it's material, design, and manufacturing. While one carabiner may not suffer from being dropped from a significant height, one other could. Just like Black Diamond states in the very text you quoted, "if only light scratching is visible and gate ...


3

Ray Mears has produced videos on sharpening knives. In particular, sharpening them in camp and in the field. The teqhnique is pretty much as @WedaPashi explains it, but it's good to see a video of the correct approach.


3

Just a suggestion, you could try putting a small amount of something abrasive (such as rock salt or perhaps gravel) into the bag, closing the bag securely with a zip tie on the zipper pulls & placing it in a clothes drier on the Fluff setting (no heat) for some period of time. Or if putting it in the drier makes you nervous, you could try agitating it ...


2

You can find some goretex patches that you can use to repair. I fixed a pair of gaiters where crampons opened a whole on the side using one of those patches. I didn't turn up very good but I think it was my job instead of the patch itself. :) Goretex website has some information. I haven't used goretex for a while so I don't know how things are. ...


2

Wearing gloves constantly is quite normal in the temperatures below -10 C, and on the high altitudes, the temperatures are much lower. Additionally, metal has high warm conductivity, which means, touching it will quickly drawn warmth from you. There are anecdotes about stupid guys tricked by mean girls to lick the axe by the low temperatures, which causes ...


2

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...


2

Kill the bacteria that turns perspiration into a foul smell, sounds crazy but put them in the freezer overnight. This and a through onslaught with any other antibacterial treatments e.g. biological washing powder in luke warm water. As far as I'm aware there is no permanent cure. Do Not put them in the washing machine or use hot water as this may melt the ...


2

When you should wax your skis: If you are a racer, ideally every time you race If you do freestyle, once at the start of the year, end of the year, and in-between when needed (see 4-6) If you ski powder, once per week or when needed (see 4-6) Whenever there is a noticeable snow (dry or wet) or temperature change (5-10 degrees Celsius) If your bases get ...


2

Using a NON Silicone based spray will keep them waterproof longer. Silicone is not recommended for canvas and gore-tex for waterproofing.


2

You sharpen the secondary / backbevel (the 15 degrees) when you do not get that hair-popping sharpness form the 20 degree angle. Or you use the 15 degrees to get a knife with a thick bevel to razor-sharpness and then use the 20 degrees afterwards. I think the CD that comes with the sharpmaker has some more hints. A visual for your target bevel from ...


2

If it ain't broke don't fix it. These's only one real guideline for sharpening anything, and that is to sharpen things when they get dull. If your edges aren't dull, or dinged, or rusty, then they likely don't need to be serviced. Inspect your bases and edges for any nicks or gouges regularly, if you take your board or skis to the shop to get waxed ...


2

Quite the contrary, modern carabiners have been known to ( surprisingly ) increase in strength when dropped a couple of times. http://www.geir.com/mythbuster.html http://www.roadtoelcap.com/blog/the-5-biggest-safety-related-myths-in-rock-climbing#.VIvrlorF-C0 But still, there's something about a dropped carabiner that just doesn't sit right in your gut. ...



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