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13

According to this site there are only a few things that can go wrong with your compass: Mechanically, it can become hard to read because of a cracked dome or contaminated fluid; it can leak, causing a bubble in the fluid which, if allowed to grow, will interfere with damping of the dial; or it can become “sticky,” a condition that prevents the card from ...


11

Simply throwing them in the wash should suffice, but if you want to be extra sure the fungus dies, you could soak your socks in a 1 part bleach to 10 parts water mixture for ten minutes. Keep in mind that it's not your socks you need to worry about so much as your shoes, they're a little more difficult to clean. Try changing your insoles out, they make ...


8

There is a UIAA certification for slings just as is there are for (nearly?) all critical recreational climbing gear. You should only have reslinging done by a company that produces UIAA certified climbing softgoods. Certification logo: http://www.theuiaa.org/upload_area/Safety/Standards/Safety-Standards/UIAA_104_Slings_March_2013.pdf


8

They are user replaceable, in fact some manufacturers recommend replacing slings every 2-5 years if they're very frequently used, but they're only user replaceable if you know how to sew structural climbing gear and have the equipment to bartack a loop of SuperTape or 10mm Dynex. The simplest thing to do is simply replace the worn sling with 1" tube ...


8

It is normal to a certain degree that wet leather, after drying, is a bit stiffer than before. The effects will generally be worse the longer your leather was in contact with water if the water was hot/warm the faster the leather dries (so don't dry over a heater!) Normally the stiffness should go away soon if the items are worn/used: after a short ...


7

It looks like the waterproof coating is flaking off. Try washing with a cloth and warm soap and water. I've had reasonable success with this method in the past.


7

In simple terms. Yes. But it is easily avoided. When not in use dry off the bow and keep it in a waterproof case. Like anything, prolonged moisture is damaging. Using it in the rain is no problem, I'm talking about days or weeks without being dryed. Same goes with the string. They are usually coated in beeswax but moisture will eventually take effect. ...


7

Hot Water - needs to be very hot - 140 F (60C) - reported to kill all, but is not good for wool. UV Light - hang out to dry in direct sunshine. Products exist that claim to sterilize shoes using UV light and can be used for socks. Chemicals - Anti fungal Laundry rinse (e.g. Canestan) is effective, Borax etc. Bleach alone does not kill fungus spores. ...


6

Oil the knife, then leave it alone until you are prepping your outing. Oil doesn't evaporate, it dries. When it's dried, it has the same and perhaps even better protective properties than fresh oil. It just makes you feel better to see the shiny fresh oil, but unless you wiped it away, it's still there and has dried. When you are prepping for your outing, ...


6

When you think of the amount of wool we normally wear and use - and how it behaves - the only reason a wool garment would stink is that the wool hasn't been properly processed. This document is bit of an eye-opener. https://oecotextiles.wordpress.com/2009/08/11/what-does-organic-wool-mean/ On average, each ton of greasy wool contains: 150 KG ...


6

As mentioned in comments, this option to coil a rope will get you some twists in it. So I do not recommend it for longer ropes (i.e. your climbing ropes), as twists are very inconvenient when belaying. This mode is mainly suited for cordelettes that you want to attach to your harness and therefore should be compact. To create such a coil follow these steps: ...


6

It all depends on the bow. I'll run through the three most common. For a recurve. Never left strung and detach the limbs. My personal superstition is make sure the top and bottom bolts always go in the same locations, but this isn't proven to make any difference. Make sure it is kept in a dry place. You can get some nice padded boxes to store them in. When ...


5

I will not address the issue of whether the helmet in question is still usable or should be retired but instead answer the main question: How to wash a foam helmet? Generally water must not damage any kind of helmet you want to use for climbing, as it has to be usable in long constant rain. So rinsing with water without additives is certainly save. The ...


5

Just a suggestion, you could try putting a small amount of something abrasive (such as rock salt or perhaps gravel) into the bag, closing the bag securely with a zip tie on the zipper pulls & placing it in a clothes drier on the Fluff setting (no heat) for some period of time. Or if putting it in the drier makes you nervous, you could try agitating it ...


5

The information you need is on the manufacturers website. We offer servicing for DMM Cams (trigger wires and slings), and Torque Nuts (slings) if they pass a quality inspection. Prior to sending them to us, we ask you to inspect and assess your gear in accordance to the supplied user instructions and inspection criteria. for others considering ...


5

Best thing you can do is find a video on the internet of someone putting them on – same make and model of chains as yours if possible, then practice several times, ideally when it's warm an sunny or in your garage. Its OK to go for a short drive (100meter or so) up and down a quiet street to get the feel of them, but don't go fast – max speed with chains ...


4

Silpoly is based on polyester, which means it's hydrophobic (doesn't absorb water). Not all slippery materials are hydrophobic, but this definitely factors in. Silicone sealant also repels water, but through different properties. Those different properties are also the ones that let it adhere to many different surfaces. Silicone has a high coefficient of ...


4

Full leather shoes are easy to take care of in a way: they'll perform exactly accordingly to how you treat them. First off: if the shoes are new, don't to anything. They'll already be treated/impregnated and ready to use (apart from breaking them in). You'll likely not gain anything by applying additional impregnation. Treatments I have experience with: ...


4

I own a couple of different Fjällräven items (trousers, jacket, duffel) and a number of my friends to as well. While my personal experience with the Greenland wax is limited, it is my understanding, that you can basically personalize your items to your specific need using more or less wax. More wax means more water repellent, stiffer material (less wear ...


4

If your putting it away for a long period of time I like to coat the blade in oil. The oil will repel any moisture and stop it rusting. Overtime the oil will evaporate, if you use quite a thick oil (or grease) it will last longer. You'll still likely want to give it a quick sharpen (as well as a polish and clean) when you first use it.


3

Edit: My bad. Poster is asking for globe -- the glass enclosure on the outside, not the fine thorium oxide ash mantle that breaks so easily. In passing: The lantern can be operated without a globe. I would hesitate to use it in adverse weather. The mantles are fragile and a strong wind or a raindrop can do them in, but for inside or on calm evenings, ...


3

Just another option to OddDeer. I was taught to use a block of beeswax. Make sure the string is dry and rub the block up and down the string while the bow is strung. Very cost effective, one block lasted me years, and works as well as bow wax. As a side note always wax around the nock point otherwise you will have a weak point over time.


3

First of all, yes, you should absolutely wax your bow string. Especially if you've this kind of setup. The good news is, that it's extremely easy. Get a bow wax Purchase an appropriated wax from your local bow-dealer. Just buy a "real" bow-wax. There are a lot of resources on the www which suggest different kinds of other waxes. However, this is often a ...


3

Actually, contrary to what alot of people are saying, the wash-in treatment wont block pores of multi-layer fabrics (unless its REALLY dirty) The chemicals used are designed to break down particulates as small as possible. The 'wash-in' also doesnt do a whole lot of actual waterproofing on the facbic, since its soaked in water itself. It simply removes dirt ...


3

When you should wax your skis: If you are a racer, ideally every time you race If you do freestyle, once at the start of the year, end of the year, and in-between when needed (see 4-6) If you ski powder, once per week or when needed (see 4-6) Whenever there is a noticeable snow (dry or wet) or temperature change (5-10 degrees Celsius) If your bases get ...


3

I tried using Goo Gone on a small portion of a pack like this. It did not work very well. I then tried a rubber cement eraser (It is basically a hard piece of rubber that gathers up loose pieces of the cement for graphic arts work.) That did not work. Renisis was on the right track. I tried a fine grained paint sanding block (Home Depot). That took off ...


2

I'm not a materials scientist, so can't give you a definitive answer. But I do know that if you make your own silnylon or silpoly by soaking the base fabric in a solution of silicone and mineral spirit and air-drying, the final material is far less slippery than commercial silnylon/silpoly. So it seems that the slippery finish of the commercial materials ...


2

An excellent thing to use to protect a knife blade for storage is microcrystalline wax ( a common brand name is Renaissance Wax). This is a refined petroleum wax which is less prone to oxidation than plant based oils or waxes. The issue with oils drying is that they oxidise as they dry which can make them acidic. potentially hastening corrosion and can ...


2

Whenever you store your snowboard and do not intend to use it the next day again (unless you really like your board), then do the following Clean it. Dry it. For longer storage, usually summer storage, do the same as above and Wax the base, but do not scrape off excess wax. It adds some protection while storing. Store in dry and cool place (with higher ...


1

Chlorine Bleach is not good for wool. Found a solution that worked for me - phenolic disinfectant (Lysol) the web site also suggested Pine Oil (Pine Sol or Lysol Pine Action) http://laundry.about.com/od/handwashing/fl/How-to-Wash-Wool-Socks.htm Remember to also disinfect towels, shower shoes/sandals, etc as the athlete's foot fungus can spread via laundry ...



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