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13

You do not need a tarp in addition to the rainfly of your tent (that's what the rainfly is for). While it's always nicer to pack up a dry tent instead of a wet one, as long as you air dry the tent when you get home you'll have no problems with damaging the rainfly. If you do not dry your tent at home, it will mildew and smell really, really bad. I ...


6

I don't take a tarp to protect my tent, I take it to create another dry area outside - typically for cooking and eating. It can also create shade for cooking, eating, and just lounging around. (On a rainy day I'll lounge around in the tent if anywhere, but on a nice day there are lots of options.) Packing a wet tent won't damage it, but if your tent bag is ...


6

Yes, if you are camping in rocks and snow, you will want a footprint. Since there don't appear to be any specifically made for this tent, I suggest making one out of Tyvek. It is readily available at most home supply stores here in the states (not sure on your location). Making the Tyvek match your tent dimensions perfectly is a touch of work. You'll ...


6

I do most of the transport for our scouts group and have found that the solution is mostly the simplest. Get a set of roofrails and crossbars. You should be able to get them for any type of car, make sure they're factory spec and/or from a good brand so they won't simply fly off as it's the only thing connecting the whole construction to the roof. Simply ...


6

I've always either used 3-in-1 oil or the gun oil, the kind used for cleaning and caring for firearms. These both have always worked fine for me for years and years of use. Usually I just wipe a small coating of the oil on with a shop rag before leaving it for a while. Make sure it's clean and dry before applying the oil. EDIT: AFAIK the type of oil or ...


5

1.) I would be hesitant to advise you to put them in the dryer. I've never tried or experienced it myself, and my evidence is completely anecdotal, but I've heard that the neoprene has the potential to turn brittle if exposed to forced heating. 2.) The two main things to consider when drying out gloves like this (as well as other things like boots, socks, ...


5

You can get roof bars for just about any kind of vehicle*. It's the only real option for safely transporting a boat on top of a car. If you meant what type of fittings would be good to go on top of the roof bars (J-bars, uprights, v-bars, foam etc.) then post up the kind of kayak you're talking about and I'll add a specific answer. You mentioned foam ...


5

Personally I have not found backpacks to be very high-maintenance. After a trip I completely empty my pack, shake it out, and wipe off the dust with a damp cloth. If there's sap or other problems I'd try spot cleaning them with mild detergent, but so far I've been lucky. One thing I'm careful to do (with tents and other gear as well as packs) is to prop ...


5

I recommend reflective lines for at night, and standard flagging tape for during the day. Both are lightweight and the triptease line really jumps out at night when hit with a light.


4

Your equipment should all come with a Kn rating. this is the force that that piece of gear will hold (often in what direction). So looking at a standard carabiner: This will hold 25Kn when loaded correctly (from the base to the top) 9Kn when loaded correctly but with the gate open and 7Kn when loaded incorrectly (though the screw gate) All pieces of ...


4

After some googling I found a very nice guide to axe maintenance here: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.nl/2011/04/beginners-guide-to-basic-axe-care-and.html The head of the axe is the easier part to protect. As with all carbon steel objects, the enemy here is moisture. If the head gets wet, it will start to rust. All that is required to protect it is to ...


3

After considering the existing answers and doing some additional research, here's my take: Spray-on waterproofing Spray on waterproofing should be used on Multi layer garments. You only want to treat the outer layer which reduces the chance that it will be 'wetting out' quickly, which allows the inner membrane to maintain it's porous properties. I've ...


3

Most things I can think of would stop it working even when full. My one suggestion is, is the pump below the fuel line when on its side? The fuel line is the white tube in the picture. If it is in the middle of the bottle and the fuel is low it might not be submerged when the bottle is horizontal. Have you tried putting the bottle vertically or rotating ...


3

As Russell mentions, flagging tape can work well in this situation. I carry a roll in my first aid/survival kit, as it's also useful for marking your path if you're lost, among other uses. A more permanent and reflective alternative would be to get some type of reflective fabric and attach it to your fly. You could potentially sew it on, if you're not too ...


2

In a fall, roughly the same load is applied at every point along the rope, at the climber's harness, and at the anchor. "Roughly" means that this is an approximation where rope drag is negligible, the mass of the rope is negligible, and we're not taking into account the geometry of a redundant anchor. (If the anchor is equalized, the load could be shared by ...


2

Yes, I would highly recomend a footprint. There are a lot of pros. Your tentfloor lasts much longer because of friction from rocks. You dont break your floor that fast as without footprint. It's also a little bit warmer with a floor on rock. It's much cheaper to replace the footprint You can use a piece of plastic as footprint. In the snow it's really ...


2

A filter like that will will be good for 50 gallons even if it's used over two years. You'll want to make sure you dry it properly between uses, and some filters have boiling instructions (esp. those with clay ceramics) when they haven't be used for an extended period of time.


2

Unless other gear like e.g. harnesses which are designed to take a certain load over and over again, climbing ropes get kind of "used up" with every fall they have to take. According to UIAA and other norms they have to take a certain number of falls with certain conditions (weight, fall factor etc.) to get those norm signs. Every fall weakens the rope a ...


2

From the Nikwax website: Wash-In "For the convenience of a wash-in product try: TX.Direct® Wash-In" Spray-On "For non-machine washable items or those with wicking linings use: TX.Direct® Spray-On"


1

To emphasize what Liam and Paul hinted at, in all likelihood, too much nikwax wash-in and the like could potentially act against gore-tex by blocking the pores and preventing the fabric from breathing ( thus soaking in your own sweat ). What gore-text primarily recommends on their site and what I've had more success with is simply tumble drying the garment ...


1

Polishing a blade means sanding it with very fine compound (more than 2000 factor). Specialized pastes exist just for that. For example:


1

I mostly use(d) a piece of sandpaper to get rid of residue and from what I've been testing it really helps to put an oil coating on your knife. When it's coated once it's easier to clean by just adding more oil and rubbing it off. I posted a question about axe heads but I also tested it on my knifes: What type of oil to use for axe heads


1

They key to all selly shoes is bacteria. From a prevention perspective, I always wash my feet before they spend a prolonged or arduous of time in shoes or boots. A good spray with an anti-bacteria can do the trick. I've also heard good thing about dusting them with bicarb and then vacuuming it out some time later.


1

I had a huge problem with smelly climbing shoes when climbing in the gym or on long multi-pitch days. The single most effective thing I have come across is taking the shoes off between climbs/pitches. This seems tedious at first, but once you make it part of your routine it's not that bad. There still is some smell, but the situation has drastically ...


1

I have found I had a similar issues with a couple backpacks this past damp winter. I was told Chlorine bleach but did not like the idea of a white or discolored backpack. Someone also told me vinegar although I never got around to trying it. What worked for me was just leaving my backpacks outside in the sun on hot DRY summer days. I did very little ...


1

What is the best way to maintain Gore-Tex walking boots? Clean them occasionally... Do they need reproofing occasionally or is just brushing the mud off enough? and waterproof them. You will notice that they need to be re-waterproofed...when they get wet. Also note: the Gore Tex membrane is inside the boot, between the outer (leather or ...



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