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11

Collapse them down, sandwich them with the points facing each inwards, and wrap the straps around them. You can then use a "real" crampon bag to hold them, or improvise. Some ideas for packaging them include: Cut the top off a 2 liter soda bottle (use two bottles for full containment). Make or buy a heavy (e.g. 500D) cordura nylon bag. Cut off an old ...


2

You can find some goretex patches that you can use to repair. I fixed a pair of gaiters where crampons opened a whole on the side using one of those patches. I didn't turn up very good but I think it was my job instead of the patch itself. :) Goretex website has some information. I haven't used goretex for a while so I don't know how things are. ...


2

Kill the bacteria that turns perspiration into a foul smell, sounds crazy but put them in the freezer overnight. This and a through onslaught with any other antibacterial treatments e.g. biological washing powder in luke warm water. As far as I'm aware there is no permanent cure. Do Not put them in the washing machine or use hot water as this may melt the ...


10

I'll caveat this with -- I've never vomited in my gear, nor do I know anyone who has. But I did sit and figure out how I'd try to solve this if it happened to me. Dry the liquid. This will depend on gear and season. Sunshine, freezing cold, or dirt can all work for this. Even cooking materials such as flour can work. Anything to make it less liquid. ...


1

Wearing gloves constantly is quite normal in the temperatures below -10 C, and on the high altitudes, the temperatures are much lower. Additionally, metal has high warm conductivity, which means, touching it will quickly drawn warmth from you. There are anecdotes about stupid guys tricked by mean girls to lick the axe by the low temperatures, which causes ...


5

The conductive property of the material is a critical part of this phenomenon. It would be safe to handle many plastics at very low temperatures because energy from your hand (and the moisture on it) isn't readily conducted away, and the energy that is, takes a while to dissipate into the rest of the material so the point of contact retains the transferred ...


8

The Problem with metallic equipment and cold temperatures is that your hands are moist, if you touch a very cold metallic surface (or any other smooth surface), your moisture will freeze to the surface which causes the top layer of your skin to get stuck on the surface. For Example: it's freezing cold outside and you put your tongue (which is very moist, ...



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