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9

It is never advisable to use any safety gear that you do not know the history of. Doesn't matter if it is legit, what matters is the history of the rope. If it's a club rope for climbing then there should be a record of usage and falls. If no record exists, then it is unknown whether the rope has taken any significant falls or if it is still safe to use. ...


8

There's always a difference between required and excessive. A lot of these multi tools have specific purposes. Do I require a screwdriver on a trek? Mostly no. Will I use a knife, a pair of scissors or even a pair of tweezers? Mostly Yes. So do I recommend carrying a multi tool to a trek? Yes. But having said that, there are multitude of these tools out ...


5

I usually carry 10 single-length slings and 2 doubles, which means I have 24 carabiners just for the draws. That's a lot of biners, which is of course why most people will use all wiregates for this. That's not to say that it's impossible to do otherwise. I imagine that people climbing in the 1970s would have used nylon slings and non-wiregate oval biners, ...


5

Always bring plenty of layers, so you can add/remove as necessary. When I cross country ski, I often end up very warm. Even if it's only 20°F out I may be skiing in a synthetic T-shirt. The important thing is to have the warm clothes available to put on when you stop or if the weather worsens. Should you bring a fleece jacket? 100% yes! Do you have ...


5

Yes and don't even think about leaving your fleece at home... Even if you are moving fast and therefore producing a lot of warmth by the exercise there is always the possibility to get into bad weather. And if not, what are you doing when you stop for a break? You are wearing wet clothing and it is cold. Maybe even windy. You might get hypothermia really ...


4

Here's based on my experience of bicycling in Toronto in winter (a daily 18km / one-hour each-way commute) ... Don't let your hands and feet (fingers and toes) get cold. They don't have a lot of fat and blood circulation and muscle (I guess they're mostly bone and tendon) so they need insulation. It's been decades since I last cross-country-skied but when I ...


4

I did a bit of research and it appears that NFPA 1983 is a standard for ropes used in technical rescue, similar to UIAA ratings for climbing ropes. The tag you found seems to imply that this rope meets the specifications of the 2001 edition of NFPA standard 1983 for a life safety rope. I couldn't find a free copy of the 2001 standard, but in the 2012 edition ...


4

It looks like the waterproof coating is flaking off. Try washing with a cloth and warm soap and water. I've had reasonable success with this method in the past.


4

The type of boot you want will depend greatly on what sort of hiking you are doing, both in terms of distance and terrain. Personal preference also plays a strong role. For day walks on decent paths you will probably be fine with a sturdy pair of trainers or running shoes. Whereas for longer routes over rougher terrain, a studier boot if probably better, as ...


3

I lean towards light and fast dry running shoes such as the Lone Peak from Altra. This shoe goes under $100 on sale. It also comes with a gator-ready velcro at the back. There is no ankle support which I don't personally consider a problem. I've seen this shoe recommended at trail shops. They seem to be quite popular on long trails nowadays. I recommend ...


3

I carry a compact Victorinox Swiss Army Knife (Huntsman) which I find perfectly adequate for all of the situations I have encountered in the wilderness. If you consider that too heavy to carry (3.5 inches and 28grams) then you need to reevaluate your fitness (joke!) and what kind of trade-offs you are making between weight and functionality. As an ...


3

This addresses the perfect solution for silnylon. http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/Silnylon1/index.html Or if you are wanting to continue with instruction that specifically discuss PU coatings there is this: http://dzjow.com/2012/06/18/how-to-re-coat-a-shelter/ The processes are identical, one just cites one specific kind of material while the other offers ...


2

In an alpine environment there are many ways more likely that pro could fail than the gate opening - it not like sport or gym climbing where the anchor can be trusted, therefore, its wise to presume no individual anchor will hold, so if a gate did open and release the rope, the rest of the system will keep you safe. Carrying extra screw gates 'just in case' ...


2

First of all, there's no such thing being too safe, do whatever you feel makes you more secure as long as you can do it safely. As long as you place all of your pro properly, then you're unlikely to need to use lockers as intermediate protection between belays, but, all single gate, non-locking carabiners are susceptible to failing if back clipped, or ...


2

I would hesitate to do so. The keen wading sandals I've worn let in a fair amount of gravel. This gravel, when caught between the sandal and the neoprene bootie, will make mincemeat of the bootie - causing it to leak. Gravel is a concern even when using full-on wading boots. To combat this many waders have gaiters built in. Mine do not, but I purchased ...


2

Just a suggestion, you could try putting a small amount of something abrasive (such as rock salt or perhaps gravel) into the bag, closing the bag securely with a zip tie on the zipper pulls & placing it in a clothes drier on the Fluff setting (no heat) for some period of time. Or if putting it in the drier makes you nervous, you could try agitating it ...


1

Unfortunately this advice may a bit late for you now, but if you cover the outside of the pots in washing-up liquid before putting them on the fire/wood burner and clean it after use. The washing-up liquid should stop the soot sticking and it should wipe of fairly easily. This approach is best if you are at a fixed campsite where you can easily wash your ...


1

A lot definitely comes down to personal preference. Some like tall boots, light weight trail runners, more "classic" hiking boots, regular sneakers, or even sandals (I don't recommend that last one...) My preference is actually for a 8" combat / law enforcement style boot (preferably with a side-zip for easy removal). I feel that they provide a good amount ...


1

Full leather shoes are easy to take care of in a way: they'll perform exactly accordingly to how you treat them. First off: if the shoes are new, don't to anything. They'll already be treated/impregnated and ready to use (apart from breaking them in). You'll likely not gain anything by applying additional impregnation. Treatments I have experience with: ...


1

I treat my leather boots with neatsfoot oil, and that generally is plenty to protect the leather and keep it supple in mud and wet. If it is snow with a lot of salt and things around, I might add something waxy like Snoseal or mink oil. Overall, neatsfoot oil is cheap and works wonderfully. Generally it is all I need spending a lot of time outdoors in ...


1

I would like to point out that in my line of work, we have retrievable ring and webbing anchors. They're called ring and rings. They probably wouldn't work in every circumstance, but i know that they would work in some. Just look up ring and ring friction savers.


1

Yes, this will reduce the strength of your sling. Look at the rating on your carabiner, though. It's probably something like: 23kn, 7kn, 7kn. What will reduce the strength of your system most? Loading your biner sideways! This technique is a great way to mitigate that risk. Much more worth the reduction in strength of the sling, even if it is as much as ...



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