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9

It happened to me. I was the belayer, and it was a slab. The leader panicked before reaching the next bolt and started to walk backwards, pushing her shoulders back, out of control. When the rope finally pulled, most weight was on the upper part of the harness and she flipped down. She hit a spike with the bottom of her head. She had a bad injury despite ...


6

You will always find climbers saying they want 100% safety for their hobby. That's a bit like the mountaineers trying to go on ski tour or doing alpine tours only if there is literally no avalanche risk, no risk of stone fall, no chance to get bad weather and so on. It is impossible to get these bulletproof safety margins. You aren't 100% safe if you go in ...


6

When climbing wearing a heavy rucksack (such as Alpine climbing), it is quite possible to end upside-down after a fall. This is why many European alpinists favour a full body harness or a separate chest harness worn in addition to a typical sit harness. This raises the tie-in point on the harness and therefore raises the centre of gravity to help prevent ...


6

It can happen, sure, but because of the way a climbing harness fits (you sit in it) and because of the way falls typically happen (you fall straight down from an upright position in many cases) it is generally very easy to remain upright. There are various pros and cons on holding the rope when you fall (the main problem being grabbing the wrong rope and ...


5

It depends a lot on the terrain. I wear a pedometer throughout the week (health program for work), and I use a GPS when hiking. From experience - on level terrain - I know that I get between 2100 and 2200 steps per mile. I walk between work and the coffee shop (a round trip of about 1.25 miles) each day, and this is fairly consistent. If you calibrate ...


5

I did this with my dog the other day. He seemed to quite enjoy the experience...It was much warmer in the bag than out.


3

Several people have already mentioned getting special gloves that have "flippable" finger tips, but no one has specifically mentioned sensory gloves which can be a little bit different than gloves that just flip their tips. In addition to flip-tips they also have a little hole that you can touch through, so you don't actually have to take your finger tip all ...


3

While I'm not too familiar with this brand, a 2013 article on BackpackingLight (largely paywalled) discussed recent developments in canister stoves, most of which are now manufactured in Asia. I think some of the comments from that article, and a preceeding 2009 article discussing Chinese manufacturing of outdoor gear, may apply here as well. Manufacturing ...


3

TL;DR: Look for manufacturer standards associations (UIAA, CE, ISO): Climbing Gear Strength Rating and Testing Standards The general rule of thumb about gear in Rock Climbing is when you have any doubt about any piece of gear, don't use it. That being said there are a couple of things to go off of when judging safety equipment manufacturers: STRENGTH ...


3

I wouldn't label this as a "myth" tout court because it may depend on the very single piece of gear, I mean it's material, design, and manufacturing. While one carabiner may not suffer from being dropped from a significant height, one other could. Just like Black Diamond states in the very text you quoted, "if only light scratching is visible and gate ...


2

Quite the contrary, modern carabiners have been known to ( surprisingly ) increase in strength when dropped a couple of times. http://www.geir.com/mythbuster.html http://www.roadtoelcap.com/blog/the-5-biggest-safety-related-myths-in-rock-climbing#.VIvrlorF-C0 But still, there's something about a dropped carabiner that just doesn't sit right in your gut. ...


2

You sharpen the secondary / backbevel (the 15 degrees) when you do not get that hair-popping sharpness form the 20 degree angle. Or you use the 15 degrees to get a knife with a thick bevel to razor-sharpness and then use the 20 degrees afterwards. I think the CD that comes with the sharpmaker has some more hints. A visual for your target bevel from ...


2

Having the rope behind your leg massively increases the chance of being turned upside down when falling, this is quite dangerous but is avoidable with care! Perhaps to answer your question more specifically the proper use of normal gear prevents such incidents and a helmet can add protection if the worst does happen. This link contains a video showing bad ...


1

Pedometers seem to be calibrated for use on flat ground. Rough or difficult terrain can cause you to take more steps and it is this mechanism which pedometers use to determine their output. If you have a known pace length and can compensate for it using some measure for it to be diminished when walking a route that isnt flat then id say it could be mildly ...


1

If the top biner gets loaded weirdly against a hanger, a fixed connection to the sling (girth hitch) makes it more likely that the biner will break. This is why non-alpine draws have the top biner free and the bottom one fixed. Petzl Manual


1

There are a few things to think about: Fabric. Selection of fabric will affect weight and durability. Whatever you get, make sure it's UV resistant, and you should probably consider something with rip-stop. For me, the ultrasil nylon is a bit light (I doubt it would handle much of a tree branch falling on it). At the same time, a durable canvas tarp ...


1

Years ago in college I took an outdoor rock-climbing class, and what I bought for it were shoes and chalk. I didn't buy anything else, as the ropes and belaying equipment were already provided by the instructor when we went out to climb. Chances are pretty good that if you go with a group of people, someone already has ropes and harnesses.



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