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8

I think the reason for this difference in slipperiness is purely a factor of surface material. Most foam pads have a tacky surface finish. Inflatable pads, on the other hand, usually have a sturdy synthetic fabric as the surface. Fabric on fabric (sleeping bag on inflatable pad) will stick less than fabric on foam, unless the fabrics have been treated ...


5

This is a difficult one. Like you, I always trim down my distance packs because I can't stand excess straps flapping about (for small day packs I just tie them up if necessary) The way I do it is pack for a worst case cold winter trek - planning for the longest expected time I would go for, and all the clothing and gear, and pack it up as if I was about to ...


5

This is the first time I heard of this. But look at this PDF document: http://www.rockymountainrescue.org/outdoor_safety/AnalysisHappyHour1.pdf Apparently it is common practice to wind lengths of webbing onto spools and join lengths together (or "splice") with tape of some sort! From the above document: Photo of both sides of the "splice" after the ...


4

Your equipment should all come with a Kn rating. this is the force that that piece of gear will hold (often in what direction). So looking at a standard carabiner: This will hold 25Kn when loaded correctly (from the base to the top) 9Kn when loaded correctly but with the gate open and 7Kn when loaded incorrectly (though the screw gate) All pieces of ...


3

There are two options. You could buy a 2-season tent, that would be light(er than a 4 season for sure) or a tent fly. A tent fly would be ideal as it would be very light but I wouldn't use in some places where there are animals dangerous wandering around during the night. A 2-season tent you can zip it up and sleep without the problem of snakes, scorpions ...


2

In a fall, roughly the same load is applied at every point along the rope, at the climber's harness, and at the anchor. "Roughly" means that this is an approximation where rope drag is negligible, the mass of the rope is negligible, and we're not taking into account the geometry of a redundant anchor. (If the anchor is equalized, the load could be shared by ...


2

I think it's not the material or fabric on the top it's more the shape of the pad. The most self inflatable pads are fully flat and even on top. The most other pads aren't flat because they have chambers. This gives a uneven surface of the pad. So my conclusion is: You have less friction with the inflatable flat pad because of the surface structure, even ...


2

At the risk of sounding like a grumpy old person it seems like EVERYTHING is slipperier than it used to be. I'm not sure if new stuff starts slippery and gets less so, or if things are now made more slippery. But I have bought a new tent, new sleeping pad and new sleeping bags this year and between them - I had better set up on 100& level ground. I used ...


1

Sometimes it's better to have a bit more than 3 inches left. When you drink/eat a lot in the beginning of a trip (to not carry to much water). And also 3 inches are not that much to pull with gloves. My tip is to cut the strap so that you reduce the width. Normally the straps are very wide and only for pulling you can use also a smaller strap. So let 1-2 ...


1

Additionally to longboards, you could investigate a mini-Malibu ("mini-mal") / mini-longboard shape, with lengths in the region of 7'x" - 8'x". As a beginner you'll find such a board easier to control than a longboard, and thus less frustrating to use, although longboarders will out-pace you when paddling onto a wave.



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