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14

You can find smaller backpacks called daypacks but regarding the actual activity they are mostly around 25-35 litre. Smaller packs are often used for biking, trailrunning and as climbing backpack. The last mentioned might not be the right ones for you because you simply don't need to attach a rope or other features of those backpacks. For cycling and ...


11

I was once shown a great way to protect the blade on a wood axe or hatchet. I realize that ice axes are a different shape than wood axes, so this may not be a perfect solution, but maybe it will give you an inspiration for something similar. Get an old garden hose. Cut a length of the hose about as long as the axe's blade. Cut an incision down the length ...


11

Collapse them down, sandwich them with the points facing each inwards, and wrap the straps around them. You can then use a "real" crampon bag to hold them, or improvise. Some ideas for packaging them include: Cut the top off a 2 liter soda bottle (use two bottles for full containment). Make or buy a heavy (e.g. 500D) cordura nylon bag. Cut off an old ...


10

I've had to deal with this question a lot teaching anchor building. When people have asked in the past I normally suggest they use the anchor you are most comfortable setting up, as they will both definitely work. That said, if we want to dive deeper into the rabbit hole, it's important to identify some distinct differences between them. Equalette: ...


7

You've already mentioned the cons. The advantage of a hydration pack that doesn't require sucking on the tube becomes apparent after slogging up a long, hard hill. Your diaphragm is already exhausted and putting all its energy into pumping your lungs. Putting in the extra effort to create the vacuum necessary to suck water out of a straw suddenly becomes ...


6

For the spike, I usually just take a piece of corrugated cardboard, fold it to double the thickness, punch holes through it, and use some thin cord to tie it through the hole in the spike. This is low-tech and works if I lose my protector while traveling, which is what always happens. No matter where I am, it's always pretty easy to get some cardboard. For ...


4

Both cordelettes and equalettes are made from loops of durable material; either a very large sewn sling or a loop of accessory cord (6 meters of 7 mm accessory cord is a common length). The issue with cordelettes that led to the idea of the equalette is that a standard cordelette does not equalize loads all that well. Most of the load will be applied to ...


4

This is the bag: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/high-sierra-whitewater-hydration-backpack-insulated-2l~p~1071h/ If you didn't know it was a hydration pack, the water bladder must have been removed. While the posts about "daypacks" are somewhat correct, most of the time when I see super-small backpacks, they are like yours - hydration packs that have ...


4

I have several suggestions of how you could do this. If you are going to use rope I would use 3 pieces of thinner rope 2/3mm paracord should be more than strong enough. I would then tie a shear lashing (see picture) on each leg. You want to try and use a significant length of the pole or possible even tie to lashings per pole to reduce the amount of ...


4

I think you bought the wrong pair of 5.10s. I've got some Anasazi Whites I specifically bought them for edging. they have a thick(ish) sole area around the rim to provide better support when placing weight on the edges. I would suggest that the Moccasym's are a lot softer and are optimised for smearing on rough rock. 5.10s are known to be more ...


4

I can think of the following two ways to cover the blade: You can use something like a Bike Handle cover, the one that has a cap on the other end. You can get it of the size that your fits in. I assume that the main blade will be a bit hard to fit in, but then you can always give a try towards getting the handle cover which is a bit flexible(probably made ...


3

What came to my mind when I read WedaPashi's answer about bicycle handles was the use of old bicycle tubes to build some sheath. The rubber of the tube is flexible but it's not too easy to perforate it, therefore you can build your sheath rather close-fitting. Also you can glue it easily with bicycle patch glue.


3

Using a hanger worked great. The clips I made replaced the slider legs of the mini-tripod, and the other end engaged the tent pole sleeves. I bent up a pressure clip so they would not slide out. I can even move my ultra-light tripod around and it stays together. See pictures below. Set Up Close Up How Mounted Bottom View Notice the pressure clip ...


3

Your climbing shoes shouldn't hurt at all. Andrew Bisharat has a great article to read on the subject: http://eveningsends.com/climbing/climbing-shoes-tight/ In summary, here's what the article says: It's a misconception that shoes have to be uncomfortably tight for good performance. Using shoes that are too tight can cause various physical problems. ...


3

Such small bags are often known as daysacks. However, in my experience the best way to search for bags is by their size. Bag size is generally measured in L (even in the US I think). Most larger bags will have their size in the name. Some smaller bags don't, but is you can find the bag online it will generally have size information. Looking at this bag I ...


2

Those large sun glasses that are used after cataract surgery are great - stops 100% of all types of uv and completely covers your eyes. New $70, used $5 at charity store or just take your mums. Yes, you will look like an old person and they are breakable plastic, but for $5, buy 2.


2

Glow sticks and an LED disc are great ideas. Another option could be glowing body paint; looks like fun :) That game is also on a beach which means less concerns about twisted ankles


2

Old question, but you never got a decent answer...so here you go: Contact Tent Pole Technologies at polesforyou.com./ They make custom tent poles and can do so based off of the pole specs you have already listed. Many in the outdoor industry (EMS, REI, etc) use them for repairs and warranty work when they run out of the extra pole sets they have ordered ...


1

I too have wondered about the difference. It makes no sense to me… for years women have used the same bag and now they need a whole new line? I am a tall woman (5'11") and a man's bag fits just fine for me A recent New Yorker interview with the guy who started UnderArmour said to make women's gear "shrink it and pink it". Pathetic, but seems to be true.



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