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19

In Canada, at least, we do distinguish between kayaks and canoes, and those are the words I'll use for the contrast here. To first make sure there's no confusion, have a look at the articles in wikipedia: "A kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double bladed paddle. The ...


8

I think this site might have the answer for you. Main points there are: Protect against Hull Damage & Distortion. Do not let the kayak to bend, distort, and getting damaged. Protect from Harsh Weather, Sun & Other Elements. The kayak is usually made out of materials which don't resist the sun infinitely, better to protect them from direct sunlight ...


8

You can drill some holes in your carabiner and use it as handle for mugs and other things in your home you need to lift. mug example


8

I think the reason for this difference in slipperiness is purely a factor of surface material. Most foam pads have a tacky surface finish. Inflatable pads, on the other hand, usually have a sturdy synthetic fabric as the surface. Fabric on fabric (sleeping bag on inflatable pad) will stick less than fabric on foam, unless the fabrics have been treated ...


7

Other things to consider than just what to bring are what the rest of the weather will be beyond just raining. Will it be cold or still quite warm, what is the wind doing (especially if you're going up any big hills), etc. Depending on how severe the rain is flash flooding may be a risk, especially when it has been very dry before. Similarly if some paths ...


7

50N refers to 50 newtons. This is the buoyancy force that the buoyancy aid provides (10N ~= 1kg). This site has some useful information on buoyancy aids and ratings. 50N is the pretty much the standard rating for things like kayaking or dinghy sailing, with the occasional higher rating (60/70N). However, note that they are not designed to self right and so ...


7

In my opinion you should also take the hybrid helmets into account. As far as I know, hardshell helmets are more robust than foam ones but they are heavier. That's also the reason they invented the hybrid, to get a compromise of both. Hybrid has a thinner hard outer shell (lighter than the extremely robust hardshell helmets) to protect against deformation. ...


6

This is probably going to be an unpopular opinion because it's not nearly as "feel good" as helping remote Asian herdsmen. (Which incidentally is probably one of few exceptions to what follows.) Nevertheless: It is my belief that unsafe carabiners should be destroyed. In my opinion it is too great a risk that someone will get ahold of one and see that it ...


6

If you're handy with welding (or a drill and screws, brackets, or a hot glue gun), you can make a pretty cool coat rack or key rack out of old carabiners. You can remove the gate for a coat rack by knocking or drilling or cutting off the pins, or leave them on if you're making a key holder. Just attached the carabiners with the hook down and out from the ...


6

The bare-minimum that I'd buy should have a 50 Newton. 50 Newton The guys I've known who do Surfing, Water-skiing, Kayaking, Water-sailing, Canoeing and all sorts of crazy water sports stuff, would go for a 50N rated aid. It also depends on how much are you going to bank on that, right? And, mainly this is applicable to all those who knows swimming or ...


5

This is the first time I heard of this. But look at this PDF document: http://www.rockymountainrescue.org/outdoor_safety/AnalysisHappyHour1.pdf Apparently it is common practice to wind lengths of webbing onto spools and join lengths together (or "splice") with tape of some sort! From the above document: Photo of both sides of the "splice" after the ...


5

This is a difficult one. Like you, I always trim down my distance packs because I can't stand excess straps flapping about (for small day packs I just tie them up if necessary) The way I do it is pack for a worst case cold winter trek - planning for the longest expected time I would go for, and all the clothing and gear, and pack it up as if I was about to ...


5

The British Mountaineering Council (BMC) has a downloadable helmet guidebook which addresses this question pretty well. As a brief summary: Hardshell helmets give good protection against impacts from above, e.g. rock fall, and can cope with repeated small impacts. This makes them the most suitable type for mountaineering or long routes. However they give ...


4

If you are going to alpine area, your most important concern has to be security. Even with best equipment, knowledge about the dangers and how to avoid them is far more important. As you specifically asked for equipment, I will address these points. The only way I know of to spend a cold winter night comfortable is in some sort of a snow cave. There are ...


3

A nalgene water bottle holder! You can then clip it to the back of your pack, and it helps with carrying it around! You may want to decorate yours though. Also caribiners are nice just to always be attached to your backpack for anything with a loop!


3

Non-cheep correct-size raincoat. Mine is a decent quality (maybe 40 euro), but is too small for me and my trousers get soaked. Also, it should cover the backpack, as backpack-only rain-protection doesn't work in heavy rain - water finds it's way. Gaiters and boots, obviously. One more pair of socks than you think you will need. There are cheep wool socks ...


3

The big difference between canoeing and kayaking is the cargo capacity. Kayaks might have small portholes to store gear in, otherwise you're stuck with what you can lash onto the top of the kayak. Whereas canoes are the pick-up truck of the backwoods and you can have a level of exhorbient luxery rivalling car-camping. Want a proper chair to sit in at camp? ...


3

There are two options. You could buy a 2-season tent, that would be light(er than a 4 season for sure) or a tent fly. A tent fly would be ideal as it would be very light but I wouldn't use in some places where there are animals dangerous wandering around during the night. A 2-season tent you can zip it up and sleep without the problem of snakes, scorpions ...


2

I think it's not the material or fabric on the top it's more the shape of the pad. The most self inflatable pads are fully flat and even on top. The most other pads aren't flat because they have chambers. This gives a uneven surface of the pad. So my conclusion is: You have less friction with the inflatable flat pad because of the surface structure, even ...


2

At the risk of sounding like a grumpy old person it seems like EVERYTHING is slipperier than it used to be. I'm not sure if new stuff starts slippery and gets less so, or if things are now made more slippery. But I have bought a new tent, new sleeping pad and new sleeping bags this year and between them - I had better set up on 100& level ground. I used ...


1

Sometimes it's better to have a bit more than 3 inches left. When you drink/eat a lot in the beginning of a trip (to not carry to much water). And also 3 inches are not that much to pull with gloves. My tip is to cut the strap so that you reduce the width. Normally the straps are very wide and only for pulling you can use also a smaller strap. So let 1-2 ...


1

Additionally to longboards, you could investigate a mini-Malibu ("mini-mal") / mini-longboard shape, with lengths in the region of 7'x" - 8'x". As a beginner you'll find such a board easier to control than a longboard, and thus less frustrating to use, although longboarders will out-pace you when paddling onto a wave.



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