Hot answers tagged

10

Upsides It "looks cool" (to some) Cordage (but arguably useless as you have noted) Downsides Poor grip (compared to leather and manufactured alternatives) More likely to cause blisters Less durable, requires more maintenance PITA to clean if it gets messy/dirty/sweaty IMO - It's a marketing gimmick and nothing more.


8

This looks very much like a homemade Grigri replication (or a predecessor). I assume from your description that the moving parts both rotate around the visible upper axis (red circle): One is the cover and the upper the block with the hole on the left. The position of the block in the lower part is assumed to be fix. You insert the rope as in a Grigri, so ...


8

Modern Day Adventurers Answers to What are essential items in an emergency kit? identify patterns/guidelines about what equipment and skills to have in backcountry. This is relevant as it covers the most basic necessities for survival and rescue in case of emergency. However, I imagine those intentionally venturing and living out in the wild with purpose ...


8

The most important thing for a firesteel striker is that it is hard and has a 'crisp', although not necessarily sharp edge. Stainless steel knives tend not to work quite so well as plain carbon steel ones. In general when you use the back of a knife as a firesteel it needs to be ground with a well defined square edge to the spine. Carbon steel files work ...


7

I'm not an archer, however, I would be surprised if you would not notice any difference with your backpack as compared to no backpack – at least in the beginning. Basically with every skill that requires precise and coordinated movement of your body the precision is more or less strongly susceptible to changes of the situation in which it is performed. This ...


7

That just looks like forge scale. Those axes are hand forged and during the process oxides build up on the surface of the metal and if flakes of scale get picked up on the head of the hammer (probably a power hammer in this case) they can get driven into the surface of the steel making a shallow indent. You can also get texture where the scale falls off in ...


7

If it stings your eyes you're probably working too close, but glasses wouldn't help (goggles might). If you're using it a lot you may find it dries your skin so you could choose to wear gloves (or avoid getting so much on your hands). From using acetone a lot in industry and academia I can tell you that people use it freely without ill effects all the ...


6

Acetone is often used in nail polish removers, if it's at this strength no you would not need a mask, just make sure you're in a well ventilated room. For high percentage acetone cleaners used to remove resins and such, you should think about wearing a ventilation mask, gloves, and also possibly goggles to protect your eyes - in addition to being in a well ...


5

In terms of self sufficiency in the wild there are two main approaches, the first is to take everything you need with you in as lightweight as form as possible the second is to avoid carrying consumables (food fuel etc) and focus more on the tools and knowledge required to obtain what you need from your environment. Clearly there is some crossover between ...


4

Do spools of webbing still have splices? Yes. As Paul's answer pointed out, there was a well-known accident caused by a climber purchasing webbing with a tape splice in the middle. Furthermore, multiple retailers have various warnings that spools may contain up to three sections (ie, two splices) per 300ft spool of 1in webbing. ...


4

A hut like this should at least be dry and reasonably sheltered so you might get draughts but not direct driving winds. This means that you can afford to focus on warmth rather than more general shelter if you are confident that you can reach a hut every night. In this sort of context down sleeping bags are attractive as they offer excellent warmth and ...


4

For a lean-to: Sleeping bag - And other sleeping items for warmth. Ground pad - The floor of the lean-to will chill you almost as quickly as the ground. Also it protects your sleeping bag from dirt, etc. A tarp - This is for hanging across the door if needed to block wind and/or precipitation.


4

Until you are an amazingly skilled skater, just go with a 5. They are cheap, and to be honest, you won't be able to notice the difference. I've skated for years and I can't really tell when I'm on a board whether it's a 5 or a 7 or whatever. Higher tolerance bearings will last longer, theoretically, and pick up less grit, but I treat bearings and wheels as ...


4

To choose a good set, you first need to understand the behind the specs. Usually, binos are referred by two numbers, A x B The number (A) before the x is the magnification factor, i.e how many times closer (larger) you see the object. The number after the x (B) is the diameter of the lenses in millimeters. Then, there is a third number that's the result ...


4

Acetone smells scary but is really one of the less dangerous chemicals used for dissolving stuff. Main nasty effects: Drying skin almost instantly, not damaging it if cleaned quickly though Temporary damage to CNS, can cause dizziness I advise to do your job in outside or in ventilated area and wear gloves if you don't want to have dry skin. If you feel ...


4

I think it can be a matter of personal taste, however: Some people craft their own knifes, and using a paracord wrap as handle is easy to do, and easy to redo. There are some more and some less good looking wrap styles - again, personal taste. This also applies when it comes to knifes you buy in a store. Some may like the paracord wrap just as you like ...


3

I've owned pairs of both Keen and Ecco sandals, and have been quite happy with both. They each have solid leather construction with comfortable padding on the inside, and they tend to hold up well. The sandals are cut so that water flows out of them quickly. The down side is that this allows gravel and sand into the sandals as well. If you're in the ...


3

As the others have said, this appears to be a homemade assisted-braking belay device or homemade descender, similar to a GriGri. The moving lobe inside is meant to grab the rope under upward pressure. More importantly, does the item have a UIAA or EN or CE markings, or any markings at all? I'm guessing not since it appears homemade. Regardless of ...


3

Looks like scaling to me, the way scaling is dealt with when forging depends a bit on the composition of the metal and the heat that is used (lots of heat=lots of scaling, you can eat away a lot of the material just in scaling if you work too hot). Normally after you acquire practice working scaling wont be a problem. These days "hand made" forging doesn't ...


3

Advise such as this is aim at the less informed and suits the majority of people most of the time. You have a solution that works for you, don't feel compelled to change it because someone who you never met, who has never put your feet into your boots tells you its better. It sounds like you boot are too small and wrong shape for you to wear thick socks, ...


2

I use two short lengths of rope, each with loops tied at both end. Put a rope around the tree and pass one end through the loop (so you have a slip knot on the tree, one end of the rope with a loop will be free). Repeat on other tree. This is very adjustable to any size of tree that is sturdy enough to support you, and you can wrap it around more than once ...


2

Merrell make several excellent shoes which are designed to be lightweight running shoes and I believe they would fit your use case neatly. Unlike sandals they offer a fully enclosed toe for greater protection, with synthetic and mesh upper and drainage ports in the sole. They're often designed to be worn sockless and so fit the foot closely to minimise ...


2

Any kayaking shop will have a selection of both shoes and boots designed for this. While you can get them with thin soles, I recommend thicker soles if you're mainly wearing them on rocky river beds and banks. You'll get a range of weights and prices. Neoprene dive boots are also an option though they tend to be heavier. For a (possibly) cheap option, ...


1

I guess the answer really is It depends As a general purpose solution I normally bring sturdy trekking/hiking sandals on my trips. Something like the models from Teva for example (many pictures on Google). I specifically look for models with have sturdy rubber soles with good profiles, and which come with velcro straps that I can fasten/adjust quickly and ...


1

For the UK in spring where you expect river crossings there is an argument for just using boots which dry fast eg unlined fabric and leather construction as these also have the advantage of being more breathable in general. If that is not to your taste then the traditional canvas and rubber plimsoles are as good as anything for river crossings as the ...


1

"Cushioning" can be better achieved with an insole designed for that specific purpose. Since almost all hiking boots allow you to swap insoles, there is no reason to get socks for "cushion". Cushioning also doesn't really help with blisters (though this is hotly debated as you can see here). Thicker socks will help with warmth but there are also other ...


1

The most important things are: Do what works for you. Try boots with the type of socks you intend to wear them with. Sock weight can be used for fine tuning even once you've bought the boots but these two points are critical. You may find that the "better" socks (with padded weight-bearing sections) are worse for you than cheaper hiking socks with a ...


1

I've hunted deer within 150 yards using 10x magnification and for the most part that was fine. However I encountered problems when trying to determine if a buck was a 2 point or a 4 point, which meant waiting / hoping for the animal to come closer or spending a lot longer studying the picture. Details like that can be critical when hunting and can make the ...


1

Since you are interested in bowhunting, I would recommend a thumb or a trigger release. Most people acquire an index trigger release when they are just starting out because they can be had for as little as $25. Archery shops sell tons of these. They allow you to find a good form, rhythm, and release cadence. While I have had good experiences from index ...


1

In addition to personal equipment appropriate to the terrain and conditions there are some rescue specific basics which should be easy to provide: Shelter : this should be easy to erect around a casualty in any terrain so things like tarps and blankets are preferable to tents. Medical : even if you don't have proper medics, basics like field dressings ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible