Hot answers tagged

10

Well, basically the difference is just that their design is mirrored. However, I have the feeling that your real question behind the actual one is "Why do they have to be mirrored?" Compared to "normal" socks, which are basically just a symmetrically knitted tube that is closed at one end and has a kink somewhere in the middle and can be worn on either left ...


8

You could look at bungee cord hooks. They're pretty cheap and come in a bunch of sizes, plus you can bend and adjust them to suit your purpose. You can get them attached to bungee cord, as a length of cord or as a loop, or you can purchase them individually. Another option if you do want to use an antler is to check out pet shops, they tend to have loads ...


6

You could make your own with a smaller piece of hardwood 1x4. With a jig or bandsaw, cut a notch out for the hook, then remove material along the outside to make it narrow. Guaranteed to be comfortable and sit flat in your pocket. Just draw the hook shape first so you know what it will look like and where to cut. You can even smooth it out with a rasp or ...


6

I'm from Switzerland and must have used a dozen or so different types of sleds over the years. By far the fastest types I have ever ridden (and still do so ever winter) are 'Rodel' type sleds which are common in Switzerland/Austria/Germany. The steel runners have relatively sharp edges, making it possible to even steer them on frozen snow/ice (to some ...


6

I believe the answer to your specific question is no; the only boots I know of with tech fittings are hard boots made of plastic or carbon fiber. However, I think you may be underestimating those boots. AT boots are hard plastic but can still offer a soft feel. Transitioning to skinning uphill consists of not just unlocking the heels but also switching ...


5

Bow Quiver vs. Back Quiver A bag with a shoulder strap is super simple to dream up and create whereas a workable bow quiver is much harder to build. Of course this only matters if you are making it or don't have access to modern building methods. You can store more arrows in a back quiver than a bow quiver. This is a matter of simple real estate. You have ...


5

For the most part they are identical, the only identifiable difference is that military spec tube webbing has a ribbed weave, while climbing spec has a smooth weave. Having a smooth weave obviously makes tube webbing better for tying and most importantly, untying knots; it also makes it a lot easier to pull through your carabiners, especially when stacked. ...


5

First of all, trekking poles will change the way you hike forever. They are a luxury that saves your legs a lot of exertion, sparing you a lot of energy, allowing you to enjoy yourself that much more. Trekking Poles have a lot of features that XC pole lack. Many Trekking Poles have shock absorbers in them which dampen the load to your wrists when they ...


4

What you might want to look at getting are some randonee boots and some Dynafit bindings. They're designed more for racing up ski hills than they are coming down, but still do a good job on the quick descent. Randonee Boots: They aren't super soft, you're never going to get the control you want on the down hill with super soft boots alpine boots, you'd ...


4

In addition to @ShemSeger's answer, there exists another minor difference that is also visible in his images: On the red webbing, there are three white threads. Each of these threads stands for 5kN of strength. All climbing webbing that I know has this kind of marking, though often in a different color. At first glance, this might seen to conflict with the ...


3

Firstly, Sit On Top (SOT)'s are always a great option for a beginner as you do not have the requirement to learn to capsize. In this sense they should not be disregarded. If you fall off you fall off. A SOT also can handle anything except really white water, you can river and sea kayak on them - also they're great if you have other hobbies like fishing. But ...


3

The first picture is of spinners. you tow them though the water and they spin and sparkle, attracting the attention of predatory fish. Use these where you have good visibility in the water. The different sizes colours will depend on what fish you want to catch. The second set are lures. Again designed to be pulled though the water but slower. these are ...


3

I'd recommend a common particulate respirator, you can buy them in bulk from pretty much any hardware store or drug store. It'll protect you from dust and asbestos, but if you're venturing into any buildings that are fuming toxic or sour gases, then you need to exit and report that right away! No building should ever be venting poisonous gases, abandoned ...


3

I just buy these things in bulk at the dollar store: I call them my, "hang anything from anywhere" hooks. Not really though, they're just a double hook, and I find them really handy. Almost as handy as my "S" caribiners:


2

I am not an "urban explorer" but in other uses I have never found the simple fiber masks like ShemSeger pictures to seal well enough to be much good. It doesn't matter how good the filter material is if air leaks around the sides. I would only trust something with an actual gasket. How much airborne mouse dung possibly transmitting hantavirus would you ...


2

You do need to rephrase the question better, but I can still provide this answer. Pike will go after anything that bass will. Spinners, plugs, jerk baits, Texas rigged worms, etc etc. just about anything so long as it within reach. Trout need a more gentle approach, the Mepps style lures and perhaps the gulp worms are your best bet for trout. Real worms ...


2

I'd go with the 3 Mepps style lures, and the two spoons at the bottom left of the pic. They'll make more noise and vibrations than the others. The others looks to me to be fast retrieve lures which may certainly attract fish, but if the water is murky may be too fast for the fish to reliably catch up to.


2

Adding a quiver to the bow will increase the amount of noise, and also increase the amount of interference of the flight of the arrow as it leaves the bow. It also makes your bow heavier increasing the amount of effort to aim and hold the aim.


2

The details of how best to achieve it depend on the design of the pack, the characteristics of the individual, and the weather (which determines the clothing he'll need to be wearing), but the overriding principle behind being able to carry a significant load for a long distance without getting overly tired is for it to be supported by the hips, not the ...


2

Silpoly is based on polyester, which means it's hydrophobic (doesn't absorb water). Not all slippery materials are hydrophobic, but this definitely factors in. Silicone sealant also repels water, but through different properties. Those different properties are also the ones that let it adhere to many different surfaces. Silicone has a high coefficient of ...


2

A good estimation is to deduct 5 degrees Celsius from surface temperature to get temperature at 20m - 30m depth. (This is based on my experience over thousands of dives, but most of the diving is in temperate and colder waters) There are several factors that can influence the difference between the temperature at surface and at depth. I would say contact ...


2

I don't think you can find them anymore, but ~10 years ago Scarpa was selling a light and pretty soft plastic AT boot with toe bellows (like modern telemark boots). They were great for my Dad to transition to AT gear from 3-pin telemarking on leather boots. On wildsnow.com they have a pretty good write up about them. The heavier version (F3) might be ...


1

Background: I paddled whitewater in southern Virginia and for a few years in Minnesota. I still paddle canoes, but I'm a wimp about cold water and the rivers in Minnesota mostly only run in the Spring when they are freezing, so I don't paddle whitewater any more. Now I canoe and occasionally paddle flatwater kayaks, but I like canoes better on flatwater. I ...


1

This question has already been well answered but I would like to address a slightly different point: What's the problem with a wet rope anyway? Dynamic climbing ropes are, to the best of my knowledge, universally manufactured from Nylon 6 or Nylon 6,6. Nylon is a somewhat unusual polymer in that it readily absorbs water, and its properties change ...


1

John Muir traveled much, but it would be foolhardy to follow his pattern of starving while tramping unless there was a bigger reason for it. He would go days without any food, or possibly on a handful of crackers. Minimalism is what he lived, but there are healthier ways to do it now that didn't exist for him. Based off his writings, he would likely carry ...


1

You can have the fastest Rodel (see fgysin's answer), when you come to a bend you'll have to steer and that means braking with one foot, slowing you down overall. So I give you ... the ghosky: You can steer it by leaning to one side making it "carve" like a pair of skis. Youtube video of it in action: ghosky video. Unfortunately it costs more than it ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible