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10

They don't have certification from the UIAA. As it states on the UIAA official website: The UIAA warns that the following brands may be using the UIAA name and/or Safety Label logo with out UIAA authorization: GM: The UIAA has received email from climbers in USA, Brazil, Finland and Australia that GM advertising gear with the registered UIAA ...


7

There are many phrases that you will find concerning dry treatment of ropes, but they can all be easily related to your three categories: non-dry rope This rope has no treatment to repel water. Consequently it absorbs the most water and thus getting heavier. Wet ropes also loose some of their dynamic properties, so falls will get harder. As it is the ...


7

I would use a dyneema rope as a lightweight hauling rope, rap line, or rescue rope, but I would never use any kind of static rope to catch a fall, this would include a fall into a crevasse, or a slip on a slope. With static ropes there is nearly zero energy absorption, I image this is even more true with dyneema. In the event of a fall during glacier ...


7

Paddles board sizing are relative to what you wish to do with said board. Short boards 8' or under are generally used for children. Medium boards 9' to probably around 12' are good for calm lakes / rivers and for some fun in the surf. Long boards, 12' or more are for the more serious journeys, touring or racing. They are faster and track straighter. ...


5

While there are a variety of different arrows, there are some common signs you can look out for. First of all are the fletchings. If they are supposed to be straight, check if they still are. Others have a bend or curve in them, if this is the case check if the curve is still correct. Also check to make sure they are fully attached to the arrow. Second ...


5

What are the differences? The different ropes basically differ by how they have been treated to handle water: non-dry ropes (although I've never seen that mentioned explicitly) have no special treatment at all, dry ropes have only the sheath, treated with some water-repellant, while dry core ones also have a treatment for the core. In both latter cases, the ...


4

Do not use this cordelette for your protections: Knots will slip so the connection of the cordelette ends to form a ring will fail under load. Only use sewed Dyneema slings. Still Dyneema cordelettes are often used for climbing as they are much lighter for the same strength than nylon based ones. To know how this is possible despite the problem mentioned we ...


3

The ideal direction is with the shovel facing away from the direction of the pull. If facing in the direction of the pull, The sharp edges cut though the snow significantly reducing its holding power. The sharp edges of the shovel though the holes would cut a nylon cordette or sling - you would need to use a stainless wire or carabiners in the holes. You ...


3

Dry ropes and dry-core ropes are very similar. Basically they've been treated so they repel water (this does not make them water proof). "Wet" ropes have no treatment. What do these terms mean, and what are the conditions or types of climbing in which you would prefer one or the other? If you live anywhere where it rains and you plan to climb ...


3

I've used a Black Rapid (clone) shoulder strap and added a carabiner that I attach to my belt loop to keep it from swinging or banging against the rocks. I also connect the carabiner to the clip that attaches the camera to the strap so it holds the camera firmly at my waist.


3

The real safety issue is the condition of the harness webbing, not the type of buckle. Metal buckles don't soon wear out, whether you have to manually double-back the webbing belt or not. I don't believe the new buckles are mechanically safer, however accidents occurred simply because too many climbers forgot to double-back the webbing belt—enough so that ...


3

Wet ropes are heavier and provide less energy absorption, which is a big problem when you can't avoid wet conditions and you rely on your rope to protect you if you take a fall. Dry ropes have been impregnated with a fluoropolymer-based solution to prevent them from absorbing as much water as possible. Use of dry ropes is essential for alpine and ice ...


2

Generally you should be able to assess the quality of each anchor you're going to use by your self. Please read the article "Bolts: Check Your Safety!". Snippet: Make a constant effort to maintain awareness while climbing. When you get to a bolt, even if it has a fixed draw, as you clip the rope: Check your safety! It only takes a casual split second ...


1

The short answer by testing is yes, it is perfectly suited in those cases. Peter Popall and the Petzl team tested static and dynamic ropes for crevasse falls and held more falls with the static ones. In a ski touring guide course I attended this year one mountaineering guide brought such a rope with him. He uses it all the time and already had one real case ...


1

The products seem to be rip offs of Climb X gear. Here's the ice axe at a cheaper price. It would make more sense to buy the Climb X branded gear since the price difference is small.



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