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12

Static ropes are used whenever you're working with a static load, either raising or lowering. Dynamic ropes should be used whenever there is potential for a fall and high impact forces. Static ropes are used for rappelling/abseiling, ascending, hauling, rescue work and making anchors (accessory cord). Pretty much they are to be used in every situation ...


10

Is that kind of buckle considered obsolete? Obsolete, no, they work fine they've just been superseded by autolock style buckles. what is the reason for this? Quite simply they're just harder to do up wrong. It also means you can adjust your harness faster. Some cheaper harnesses still have single buckle harnesses but the autolock one's are ...


9

I hang my hammocks using the same slings I use for anchors while climbing, a girth hitch around the the tree is more than sufficient, but wrapping the sling a around the tree twice, then tying it with a water knot is best. It holds well, it's easy to adjust the height, and it doesn't slip when weighted. The wide surface area of the webbing is better for the ...


8

It's simply for organization sake. Aid climbing on big-walls involves lots of gear, and you'll very quickly realize how much of a mess your perfectly racked gear will become. With two belay loops you can separate your aid ladders and daisy chains a little, which helps to keep them from wrapping around each other (and keep things a little bit cleaner too). ...


8

The minute you have any doubt about it. There really is no other way to answer this question. There are so many different devices with different levels of mechanical complexity and different use and wear patterns, that it's impossible to describe what to look for in each one. Having said that, most recreational climbers would have a very hard time ...


8

I'm very satisfied with my Goalzero Nomad 7, it's small, easy to strap to your backpack, and it fully charges your batteries or anything that charges from USB or even 12V power in as little as 3hrs in good sunlight. There are lots of solar panels to choose from, any one will probably do the job, so shop for one that suits you. What you really need in your ...


6

Couple of red lines for me: As soon as there is anything resembling a sharp edge on any point of the equipment, this can cut your rope. If any part of it is broken, visibly cracked or obviously heavily worn If it's been dropped form a great height (though the whole micro cracks thing is a little contentious, better safe than sorry) If any kind of "groove" ...


4

The answer depends a lot on the style of bladder, there are a couple different styles. I have a classic camelbak, which has a nalgene sized opening on it and a handle to hang onto for filling one handed, so it's real quick and easy to stick in the water and fill up: I've had other types of water bladders though that you had to fold the tops over and ...


4

I am Czech ! the blanket rolls were used as standard issue bedrolls in the Army, in barracks they were used as well on the cots, instead of the made bed blankets and sheets issued because as anyone knows who has been in the army, making your bed in the morning and then suffering barracks inspection with roll call is a real pain in the butt !, it saved us ...


3

Sounds like what you're looking for is either an undersuit, or simply some swimming pants/tights. Wetsuit undersuits are worn under diving wetsuits to add insulation and comfort to the suit, and they help slide the suit on and off a bit easier, some are essentially built like a body-rashguard. Swim tights are exactly what they sound like, tight pants that ...


2

My standard daypack came with a Camelbak shutoff valve and quick disconnect for the bite valve. I upgraded all my other packs to have the same using Camelbak's HydroLink Filter Adapter kit, which also comes with an endpiece you can put onto a filter hose. This allows me to stop for water and, without removing the bladder from my pack, simply disconnect the ...


2

It is possible to clean/repair your bag if it's not too far gone, but buying a new one will be easier, might even be cheaper, and will certainly be better. Options for cleaning slightly mildewy bags include using vinegar or bleach (bleach will likely discolour the bag) and hot water in the wash cycle. If washing the bag and tumble drying doesn't get rid ...


2

If it has a wick in the priming pan it is most likely an international. The other main difference is the fuel tube on the international is slightly larger diameter. Although, this would be hard to tell without a comparison. However, as I commented to ShemSeger's answer there is a different diameter nozzle for kerosene. Therefore if you don't have this ...


1

I use two cheap solar panels (A5-paper size, folding ones) on bike trips, one without a battery and one with. I have both installed on my bike all day, with my GPS device plugged in to one of them all the time. I travel on roads and in a particular direction, so I can adjust them every two hours or so to face the sun. This keeps the battery on a respectable ...


1

I happen to have both stoves that you're talking about. They look pretty much identical, but you're right that the wick is in the international stove, the whitegas-only stove does not have the wick. The international stove also has a brass sleeve over the coil of pipe that directs the liquid fuel through the element where it's vapourised, the whitegas-only ...



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