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37

The only gear you need is a good, comfortable pair of running shoes and any cheap backpack (extra points for Hello Kitty). There is a popular belief, probably based on pop-culture images dating back to the 1960s, that people need big, heavy hiking boots, or that ankle support is necessary if you're going to carry heavy loads or walk on uneven ground. ...


13

Two ways to get started on a hike: with either your right foot, or your left foot :P First and foremost you need comfortable footwear. Doesn't matter what it is to get started, I've led people over mountain ranges and all they wore were cross trainers. When you get more serious into it, then you should determine what type of trails you want to hike on and ...


11

For a guided glacier tour: No reason - go ahead and use it. I would not worry about resharpening, as from your description there are no steep ice sections on the route. If there are and you like using your own hands, start filing. The quick option is to keep the geometry and just sharpen everything. The longer one is to reshape the tip so it looks more like ...


10

The single most important consideration for your parents is going to be their comfort. For starters they must have something comfortable to sleep on or they're going to spend every day achy and tired, wishing they were sleeping in their own beds. The older you get, the more precious sleep is. If they can't get a good, comfortable night's sleep, then they ...


10

Start small and simple. The important thing is to get back into the habit of walking long distances and times again. You probably haven't walked a mile in a while. For starters, walk around your neighborhood. Walk to the store. Walk to the movies. Walk to the bar (and stumble home again). Google maps provides walking times, distance and directions.; ...


10

My wife & I are both in our mid-50's, and we stopped going car camping a few years ago largely because of the lack of sleep and difficulty getting into and out of our tent. Our last trip we were so tired that I was hallucinating on the drive back home & we had to pull over on a mountain road to take a nap before we carried on. Even the nice ...


6

Most of the answers seem to be telling you how to walk so I'll assume that's covered. I think part of this is motivation as well - one thing I have enjoyed is getting a hiking book with some destinations to see, which will get you out of the house and going to see something instead of just wandering around. Maybe check this book out: 60 Hikes within 60 ...


6

The most important thing is a bottle of water, which you can carry in any kind of backpack (does not have to be a special one for a start). Further more, it depends very much on what terrain you like to go hiking. Comfortable running shoes are fine if the trail mostly consists of normal soil, but I would recommend hiking shoes with ankle support if you ...


6

From a safety perspective, there's no reason why you couldn't use that axe. But if it was mine, I'd probably have it hung up on the wall as an heirloom, or in a display case with photos of my Dad carrying it. Stuff like that carries huge sentimental value. The only other reason I can think of why you wouldn't want to carry it, is because it's going to be a ...


5

On cordelettes: A cordelette used to set up a 3 point anchor will have three loops of rope above the knot (one per piece) and three loops below. The knot itself will have 6 strands of rope running through it. (This eats up almost 2 meters of cordelette length alone.) If you cut a single strand the location of the cut hardly matters; you will still have ...


5

Physics-wise, this is called Capillary Action. i.e. touching the surface changes the physical characteristics. Simpler explanation - take a look at water in a glass. Notice the meniscus (the way water seems to rise at the edges)? That's capillary action caused by the water in contact with the glass. Don't think the hydrostatic head measures this per se. ...


5

The single most important piece of equipement you need is a good reference on the hiking trails around where you live. Read it through, pick a few that you want to do. Those books usually give you a good idea of how long it takes and how hard the hike is. For the rest, Ben Crowell has a pretty good answer. Do a few (or just one) hikes and adjust your ...


5

No, if you use an adjustable daisy chain you do not need a fifi hook. Then it is as easy as attaching the extended chain to your placement and adjusting it to the desired length. As adjustable daysies are made from one tape, there is anyway no attachement point to place a fifi hook. One sidenote: Extending the chain with one hand after attaching it is ...


4

As others said, you don't need special equipment. Shoes: If you're going on sufficiently marked, easy short trails, you can even do it in bad shoes or barefoot. Our family, including my 6 year old has covered enough trails under 3 miles in Crocs. Having said that, I do most of my shorter hikes in running shoes, and longer ones (6+ hours) in hiking shoes. ...


4

They are user replaceable, in fact some manufacturers recommend replacing slings every 2-5 years if they're very frequently used, but they're only user replaceable if you know how to sew structural climbing gear and have the equipment to bartack a loop of SuperTape or 10mm Dynex. The simplest thing to do is simply replace the worn sling with 1" tube ...


4

Hiking isn't too different from walking, except that the terrain may be rougher (depending on the path) and navigation might be more difficult (again, depending on the path). I am in the northeastern U.S. and can tell you that most people already own the equipment to hike many of the most difficult all-day mountain trails in my region. You're not even ...


4

And how is the need for it replaced with a daisy chain? Here you are confusing something: With an adjustable daisy chain you do not need a fifi anymore. Using a standard daisy chain you need a fifi when aiding. How is the fifi hook used in aid climbing? First let me describe what a daisy chain and a fifi are: Daisy chain: This is a webbing sling that is ...


4

If your parents gear worked for them 10 or 15 years ago. If the gear has not seen significant wear in storage. If your parents have remained in nearly the same physical condition (or better) as 10 years ago. The only thing they need to do is load their gear in the car and go. Seriously, it worked then, it should work now. Much of the older gear is ...


4

Basically, you have to be excited and welcoming. Encourage them, thats the most important part of it. For me Camping means getting back to the simpler life. Gear: I don't think that you need any sort of a special gear for older people when you are typically car camping. The normal car-camping checklist should do just well. Needless to say, add their daily ...


3

There are several options Goggles that fit over you prescription glasses (Commonly referred to as "Over the glasses" or just 'OTG'.) - probably the cheapest solution, used successfully by many people. Contact lenses are available for all sorts of prescriptions now days and could be worth considering. Prescription Sun Glasses - good wrap around sports ...


3

I use an axe far older than that as my primary axe. In my opinion, modern ice axes are made too short. Besides, I can get a grip on wood better than the modern materials. One thing of key note, test the self-arrest. On my axe I found self-arrest does not work on any slope steep enough to warrant it, and the only viable self-arrest mode is ramming the shaft ...


3

The other answers covered what you need as far as equipment goes - which isn't much - but I didn't see any that talked about what you need to know. You need to know about any potential dangers and how to avoid them. For example, in the DFW area: know how to recognize and avoid the types of poisonous snakes (and any other dangerous wild animals) that live ...


3

Another good idea would be to remember back to your Boy Scout days. Scouts are required to always to bring their ten essentials: Hydration (Water bottle ... probably 1 or 2 liters) Illumination (If you won't be out late, you can probably leave this) Extra Clothing (A lightweight jacket that still keeps you warm) Pocket knife (multitool) Matches ...


3

You say car camping - does that exclude a caravan ? A caravan is a significant investment in cost to buy. There may be somewhere near you that hires/leases/rents them. Plus you'll need a tow fitting on your car rated for the weight of a towed caravan. Electric cars cannot be fitted with towbars (in New Zealand anyway) Some of the places you have camped ...


3

Depending on where you are going, there may be options to stay in a canvas tent-cabins, for example these ones in Yosemite. I've done this several times with my parents-in-law. The advantages are: No tent set-up Often real (if basic) beds Sometimes heated Space to stand up Generally these will end up being more expensive on a per-night basis than a ...


2

I'd go with either polyester rope or Dyneema cord. Both are resistant to UV and neither rot nor stretch. Dyneema has superior wear resistance and is much stronger by weight, but is probably more expensive. Maybe have a look at an (online) marine store. Other yarns such as polyamide (nylon), polypropylene, etc. tend to have inferior UV resistance. I'd try ...


2

I do not know a definitive answer to this question, but as there is no other reply so far I will share what I know: When aiding in Yosemite a fellow climber used nuts for this purpose. You pull back the actual nut so that a wire loop extends behind it. This loop is places around the bolt shaft and can even be tightened. According to him this works fairly ...


2

The focal knot itself provides redundancy. According to the Ashley Book of Knots, when a cord breaks, it usually does so outside of the knot and not inside. Therefore, if the cord breaks below the knot, like you were concerned, the knot will not usually be affected or unravel. SARRR has an excellent video demonstration of this behavior with an equalized ...


2

The answer to the question in your title is simple: This is not redundant. Is this a problem? It is important to realize the following about redundancy in climbing: Mostly there is no complete redundancy in climbing. You climb with one rope, you use one sling for self arrest, ... In rescue operations we have the order to be always redundantly secured and ...


1

Yes, it is indeed due to Capillary action. As there are great answers already by Dynadin and Aravona and Snow Crash, I would strictly limit the scope of my answer to why it happens and how, just to clarify how the Capillary Action comes in place. The basic property of water molecules is staying together, we refer that as Cohesion, and those molecules also ...



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