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18

Some reasons for the long waist straps are: The most backpacks have only one size for everyone, so the backpack must fit a short/ tall/ tiny/ big person. It also depends what your wear for clothes under your rucksack, if you wear it over a single shirt or over a big insulation-jacket. For alpine backpacks or traveling: the waist straps need to fit around ...


12

Masons Line Paracord's biggest selling point is that it's strong enough to hold your body weight. That's great and all, but honestly, it's very rare to get caught in a situation where you're forced to use a rappel. The most common situation is when parachuters get caught in trees, but in those situations, you already have a bunch of lengths of paracord ...


12

This information is available under the Specs on Jetboil's website. 100g canister: 100g fuel; gross weight 194g; empty weight 94g (51.5% fuel by weight) 230g canister: 230g fuel; gross weight 356g; empty weight 126g (64.6% fuel by weight) 450g canister: 450g fuel; gross weight 645g; empty weight 195g (69.8% fuel by weight)


10

I would guess it's a carbide lamp as it was in former times used by mining workers and is still used in speleology (caving) sometimes. The basic working principle is a box with carbide and a water reservoir from which water slowly drips onto the carbide. Carbide and water chemically react and form acetylene gas which is guided through a hose to a small ...


9

If you don't have a scale, you can still figure out roughly how much fuel is in each canister with a simple bowl of water. Drop a full canister in bowl of water and mark the water line. Then, drop an empty one in the bowl of water and mark the water line. This gives you your full and empty lines for reference. Now you can drop each of your partially-full ...


7

In addition to telemark, there are randonnee, aka alpine touring bindings. These are basically regular alpine bindings, where the heel can be released, for climbing. When going downhill, the heel can be clipped back in, for greater support during steep alpine descents. Telemark skis usually aren't super great for climbing on their own, and usually require ...


6

Background Due to the very nature of light and lenses it is impossible to not have depth perception change when looking through a lens. The light will pass through the first surface of the lens, slow down (plastic is denser than air), hit the principle axis and then exit the second surface of the lens and converge at the focal point. What you are seeing ...


6

I shall have to call bullshit on this. I personally forgot to hook up my dry suit inflation hose many years ago and sank to 36m (4.6 atm) in cold UK waters. Where I suffered from serious love bites (dry suit squeeze). Luckily my buddy figured out what I was trying to imply and attached my hose for me. The cuffs would not cut you no matter the pressure as ...


5

The problem is that eyeglass prescriptions are calculated for a standard distance between the lens and the eye, with the lenses in flat frames parallel to the face. You can see the effect of varying lens-to-eye distance simply by pushing or pulling on your conventional eyeglasses, and the effect of angle by tilting them on the bridge of your nose. Your ...


3

Obviously there's a good case for considering the wear and tear on the belay loop and harness itself. Consider the case of Todd Skinner: http://www.climbing.com/climber/loss-of-a-legend/ They discussed the worn harness, talking about how people back up the belay loop with a tied sling, but neither considered it a significant safety hazard.


3

While some brands may be known for narrower boots, this also depends on the last[1] they use for a particular model. La Sportiva boots are often considered to be narrow and low-volume compared to Scarpa, but there are also differences between the lasts they use for their Trango vs. their Nepal lines of boots. (The Nepal last is wider than the Trango.) If ...


3

A lot depends on where you live and where you ski, but unless you've got solid enough skiing skills to manage ungroomed terrain at a resort, you'll struggle a lot backcountry skiing in a typical situation where AT or telemark gear would be used. There is an entire range of gear from relatively light XC touring gear to full on Alpine setups that can be used ...


2

Nylon is great for climbing ropes, but it's sub-optimal for lashing and repair since it stretches so much under load. If you are going to carry string, carry polyester braided cord. It's just as strong but stretches much less. This is all I could find on the web quickly: Cabela's Northern Flightâ„¢ Braided Decoy Cord It's 2mm cord with a 450lb breaking ...


2

The single point setup was developed to aid in very high technical levels of mixed climbing. Dual points can make it hard to keep the crampon on small rock holds. Also in certain kinds of ice, the monopoint can get a better grip. The various other setups are attempts to make a compromise between getting full grip in the ice and staying stable on rock. My ...


2

AT (Alpine Touring, aka-randonnee) is quickly rising to be the most popular form of downhill skiing. There are still those die-hard telemarkers that will never switch, and they will out distance you on the flats, but hands down AT is best for back country downhill. Buying skis is like buying shoes nowadays, what type you get depends a lot on what type of ...



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