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22

The loop allows the gloves to be hung, on a carabiner for example, such that the fingers point up preventing the gloves filling with rain or snow. For example, see the manufacturer's description of these gloves: Finger-mounted clip-in loop enables gloves to be attached to a carabiner with finger-tips facing up, eliminating snow-fill


20

In Canada, at least, we do distinguish between kayaks and canoes, and those are the words I'll use for the contrast here. To first make sure there's no confusion, have a look at the articles in wikipedia: "A kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double bladed paddle. The ...


18

Some reasons for the long waist straps are: The most backpacks have only one size for everyone, so the backpack must fit a short/ tall/ tiny/ big person. It also depends what your wear for clothes under your rucksack, if you wear it over a single shirt or over a big insulation-jacket. For alpine backpacks or traveling: the waist straps need to fit around ...


14

You do not need a tarp in addition to the rainfly of your tent (that's what the rainfly is for). While it's always nicer to pack up a dry tent instead of a wet one, as long as you air dry the tent when you get home you'll have no problems with damaging the rainfly. If you do not dry your tent at home, it will mildew and smell really, really bad. I ...


14

You can find smaller backpacks called daypacks but regarding the actual activity they are mostly around 25-35 litre. Smaller packs are often used for biking, trailrunning and as climbing backpack. The last mentioned might not be the right ones for you because you simply don't need to attach a rope or other features of those backpacks. For cycling and ...


13

Some general rules: layer system also for the hands is a good idea but those gardening gloves won't work pretty well better use inner liner gloves (wool or even a softshell glove) and a warm mitten as the outer layer to avoid cooling off use hats (again use a layer-system) including a warm winter hat which covers the ears (also see this about heat loss ...


13

It's a self-belay device for rappelling that works just like a simple figure-eight, but there is a configuration where the lever on the left allows you to release yourself under load. It's meant for canyoning, so you can rappel down some distance before taking a plunge into a pool that's a bit further down than your are comfortable with jumping directly. ...


13

This information is available under the Specs on Jetboil's website. 100g canister: 100g fuel; gross weight 194g; empty weight 94g (51.5% fuel by weight) 230g canister: 230g fuel; gross weight 356g; empty weight 126g (64.6% fuel by weight) 450g canister: 450g fuel; gross weight 645g; empty weight 195g (69.8% fuel by weight)


13

It's not animals you really need to worry about, it's bugs. I pack a tent to keep out of the bugs more than I do to keep the critters out. The only time I can ever remember having issues with animals was in the Ptolemy Plateau, for some reason there were a lot of gophers, and they were all over our campsite at night, scratching at the walls of out tent and ...


12

Searching online I found lots of useful informations, like e.g. wiki says: The accuracy of step counters varies widely between devices. Typically, step counters are reasonably accurate at a walking pace on a flat surface if the device is placed in its optimal position (usually vertically on the belt clip). Although traditional step counters get affected ...


12

Masons Line Paracord's biggest selling point is that it's strong enough to hold your body weight. That's great and all, but honestly, it's very rare to get caught in a situation where you're forced to use a rappel. The most common situation is when parachuters get caught in trees, but in those situations, you already have a bunch of lengths of paracord ...


11

Collapse them down, sandwich them with the points facing each inwards, and wrap the straps around them. You can then use a "real" crampon bag to hold them, or improvise. Some ideas for packaging them include: Cut the top off a 2 liter soda bottle (use two bottles for full containment). Make or buy a heavy (e.g. 500D) cordura nylon bag. Cut off an old ...


11

I was once shown a great way to protect the blade on a wood axe or hatchet. I realize that ice axes are a different shape than wood axes, so this may not be a perfect solution, but maybe it will give you an inspiration for something similar. Get an old garden hose. Cut a length of the hose about as long as the axe's blade. Cut an incision down the length ...


11

Yes, shoe size plays a role which is quite important. But for beginners I would suggest to think more about foot technique than caring about the best possible gear. For climbing shoe sizes I give the following simple hints: choose the shoes as small as possible choose shoes which aren't causing ache of the foot/toes/nail/heel climbing rubber shoes will ...


10

Customs may complain, but not likely. I'd make sure to pack it with your climbing gear, along with the chalk packaging. If customs suspect drugs, a simple test will confirm it for them. However, there's always the chance you'll get someone trying to make a name for himself, and give you a hard time. I had a friend who was stopped by police when he was ...


10

As Hillsons suggested a good way to use it, let me put in what I would do: You can use it as a Weight. Simply knot a carabiner to the end of a rope that needs slinging over a pole or onto a roof. The weight helps with accuracy. Clip keys inside backpacks to loops for extra security Link a few together for your kid to play with while you are shopping. ...


10

Why all the lights? you could solve everything you need and have a REALLY cool event with nothing but a lot of glow sticks :) Make people wear different colors for different teams, then one each side of the body for arms, hips and legs (so 6 glow sticks per person). That should be more than enough for a good time out there.


10

I've had to deal with this question a lot teaching anchor building. When people have asked in the past I normally suggest they use the anchor you are most comfortable setting up, as they will both definitely work. That said, if we want to dive deeper into the rabbit hole, it's important to identify some distinct differences between them. Equalette: ...


10

You've already mentioned the cons. The advantage of a hydration pack that doesn't require sucking on the tube becomes apparent after slogging up a long, hard hill. Your diaphragm is already exhausted and putting all its energy into pumping your lungs. Putting in the extra effort to create the vacuum necessary to suck water out of a straw suddenly becomes ...


10

It happened to me. I was the belayer, and it was a slab. The leader panicked before reaching the next bolt and started to walk backwards, pushing her shoulders back, out of control. When the rope finally pulled, most weight was on the upper part of the harness and she flipped down. She hit a spike with the bottom of her head. She had a bad injury despite ...


10

I would guess it's a carbide lamp as it was in former times used by mining workers and is still used in speleology (caving) sometimes. The basic working principle is a box with carbide and a water reservoir from which water slowly drips onto the carbide. Carbide and water chemically react and form acetylene gas which is guided through a hose to a small ...


9

Yes, the R-value will add of your different layers. If you wear layer A with R=5 and layer B with R=2.5, the overall insulation value will be R=7.5. To explain this a bit, we think of two layers or flat walls which interact only due to thermal conduction. This is just a model and in reality other effects will come in play. The Fourier Law for thermal ...


9

Interesting question! Here is an article describing the techniques used by arborists. The article describes a number of different techniques and different pieces of gear. I'll describe one specific method, using cheap gear, that is based on techniques that I've used in rock climbing. Buy: a short length (maybe 20 m) of 9-10 mm static climbing rope a small ...


9

You probably already do this, but make sure you mark all 'retired' carabiners with their own color of tape so that you never accidentally climb with one. Then let the fun begin. If you do any backpacking, they are extremely useful for attaching things to your backpack. A few other favorites: dog leashes, making clotheslines, or use with hammocks. If ...


9

Give them to those who need them. First of all, novice students in your gym or mountaineering school will be happy to use a bit heavier/older gear, but ease the burden of bying everything for their first trip. Just make sure that carabiners are safe, because the newbies can't tell themselves. Then, any local non-commercial groups, who organize rope fun ...


9

You can drill some holes in your carabiner and use it as handle for mugs and other things in your home you need to lift. mug example


9

Other things to consider than just what to bring are what the rest of the weather will be beyond just raining. Will it be cold or still quite warm, what is the wind doing (especially if you're going up any big hills), etc. Depending on how severe the rain is flash flooding may be a risk, especially when it has been very dry before. Similarly if some paths ...


9

I played pickup this way in college for several years. Like some of the others suggested, an LED disc works well (green works far better than red or blue in my experience). We also used glow sticks, although we generally only used them on the arms because it was cheaper, an they tended to get in the way for running when on the legs. The biggest thing I ...


9

Background Due to the very nature of light and lenses it is impossible to not have depth perception change when looking through a lens. The light will pass through the first surface of the lens, slow down (plastic is denser than air), hit the principle axis and then exit the second surface of the lens and converge at the focal point. What you are seeing ...


9

The problem is that eyeglass prescriptions are calculated for a standard distance between the lens and the eye, with the lenses in flat frames parallel to the face. You can see the effect of varying lens-to-eye distance simply by pushing or pulling on your conventional eyeglasses, and the effect of angle by tilting them on the bridge of your nose. Your ...



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