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17

To answer my own question. I checked it with different dealers and experts, and all of them told that if I want to use it on regular basis, I should consider inflatables as toys. Also here in Switzerland it counts as flotation device and is not allowed more than 150 meters offshore. I bought myself a hardshell kayak for about 300$ more and next Monday I ...


12

In general climbing ropes are quite robust in terms of storage. The Safety Research Group ("Sicherheitskreis") of the German Alpine Club (DAV) has done a lot of research about this in the 90ies and their general result was: as long as they aren't exposed to sunlight or aggressive chemicals or have been strained over a sharp edge during a fall their ...


11

You do not need a tarp in addition to the rainfly of your tent (that's what the rainfly is for). While it's always nicer to pack up a dry tent instead of a wet one, as long as you air dry the tent when you get home you'll have no problems with damaging the rainfly. If you do not dry your tent at home, it will mildew and smell really, really bad. I ...


10

This is sadly a very persistent myth that has been around rock climbing for far too long. Black Diamond says that as long as the gate action is fine and there is no major structural damage, the gear is fine. As a side note, the fact that this group decided their gear was unfit to climb on, yet felt okay selling it to someone else who would climb on it, ...


9

Roll top dry bags are fairly common. They are usually combined with either a pack cover or a pack liner. The pack liner is commonly an over-sized roll top dry bag placed inside your backpack. A cheaper option is to use a trash compactor bag as a pack liner. They are usually cheap and easy to find in the USA. Usually, the trash bag is put inside your bag ...


9

That depends entirely on weather conditions and the paths you plan to take. If you stay on cleared roads, your Icetrekkers should be sufficient (and may not even be necessary). The main problem will be snow, not ice. Hiking paths will generally not be cleared of snow, so you'd need snowshoes or touring skis. Additionally, if there is (or has been) heavy ...


7

I have one such a belt-pocket which I can either attach to my Haversack's waist-belt, or my own hiking pant's belt clips or the belt itself using a runner (but belt is not an option for you because you are using a nylon pant). It depends on both (its weight and size) at the same time since having it tied up at a wrong place can injure you and/or can be very ...


7

It's less about the type of shoe, but how your run in it. Minimalist running shoes should not "wear out" in the traditional sense since they have little or no padding to compress. Because many are just soles, then running until that sole is gone is perfectly fine. It is important to note that the reason they don't have (or need) that cushion is because ...


7

For USA to Canada flights, I have seen hiking poles being accepted (after a bit of explaining..) and refused (WestJet). If they are refused, you may be asked to go back to the luggage section which may end up making you or your poles miss the flight. In my experience it seems to vary on the carrier and the person performing the inspection. Because of these ...


7

I consider a couple of factors when it comes to dropped gear: Some equipment is pretty easy to inspect. A carabiner has one moving part (the gate, possibly a second, if it's a locker). Nuts and hexes have no moving parts.Cams on the other hand are not easily examined. Equipment like non-locking carabiners, nuts, hexes, cams are often redundant. If the ...


6

Generally the far from the civilization you go, the safer your things are. Thiefs are operating there where people live or where there are a lot of people. Distant rocks, caves etc. are not their target. I have not heard of something being stolen from someone's luggage in mountains, for example. If some point is at least a few km far from the place where ...


6

Hide your pack or move it a bit off the trail. Make sure you do not overdo it and end up not being able to find it back yourself. :-) Although you are in the wood, if you are in a popular area, it is possible that other local visit the same area. I've never heard of people bringing alarms for their bags and don't recommend it. I doubt it will be of any help ...


6

I've seen this kind of behavior. I think there's a tendency for people to want to continue to do things the way they're used to doing them, and the way they were originally trained. It can be a little frustrating when someone comes along and tells you that the new "right way" to do something is different that what you've done before. Also, if you're an ...


6

We did some research on this once and the results were kind of sad. For major backpacking brands of sleeping bags (say, Marmot or Big Agnus) the major differences between sleeping bags for the two genders were these: Women's sleeping bags were slightly smaller. A bag that is listed as a '20-degree bag' for woman would listed as a '10-degree' bag for men. ...


6

For search party purposes, bigger is almost always better, both from the perspective of the lost individual - he/she may be able to see the light from a distance and make themselves more visible or move towards the light, and from the searcher trying to see their target, perhaps an unconscious individual - spotting clothing or non-natural material is much ...


6

The manufacturer of your rope says: Time in use : The potential lifetime of BEAL PPE in use is up to a maximum of 10 years. The lifetime of the rope in use must never exceed 10 years. The rope must be retired immediately: if it has held a major fall, approaching fall factor 2 if inspection reveals or even indicates damage to the ...


6

I have not encountered a situation where a sleeping bag was "too warm" and I was unable to do something about it. I've gone backpacking in the mountains where it was 70 at night one day, and the next day, several thousand feet higher, it got below freezing. At night in the heat, I pretty much just used my sleeping bag as a blanket with the zipper all the ...


6

From looking at the Crazy Glue Website and from reading what it can be used for on the packages, I wouldn't try it on fabric, especially synthetic things like a rain jacket. There does appear to be a Crazy Glue for wood and leather. Check the website. http://www.krazyglue.com/products/product.aspx?pc=KG821 Read the directions. I have used some other ...


6

Yes, the R-value will add of your different layers. If you wear layer A with R=5 and layer B with R=2.5, the overall insulation value will be R=7.5. To explain this a bit, we think of two layers or flat walls which interact only due to thermal conduction. This is just a model and in reality other effects will come in play. The Fourier Law for thermal ...


5

What type of cookware you choose depends on what type of cooking you do. Titanium is certainly the lightest, and it's great if all you do in your pot is boil water to add to dehydrated foods (Lipton noodles, Mountain House, homemade boil-in-bag meals, etc.) or to make beverages. I've never seen or heard of a titanium pot shattering at low temperatures. ...


5

I made my own hiking trailer - first version 2011. I pulled my hiking trailer in various environments. You can read more in my Wiki pages - the text is Finnish but you can use Google translator. In my Wikipages you can find answers to many guestions and problems. It really works very well in all terrain.


5

You propose packing food deeply in your backpack. I'd specifically recommend against that. Bears (and other wild animals) have vastly more acute senses of smell than humans, and they won't hesitate to chew through your pack to get at anything buried there. Even if there aren't bears in an area, there are likely to be some kind of varmints (squirrels, ...


5

Expedition weight relates to the temperature rating and level of activity. It usually means cold and low activity. According to REI expert-advice section. For cool conditions, thermal underwear is available in light-, mid- and expedition-weights. Choose the weight that best matches your activity and the temperature. [...] Like thermal underwear, ...


5

It's not complicated. Let's say you're using a long piece of webbing to build the anchor. Before you tie the ends of the webbing to make a loop, you put the webbing through the rap ring. Then when you form the loop, the ring is linked into it. When you form the master point of the anchor (i.e., the loop that you would normally put a locking biner through), ...


5

For cams, Black Diamond recommends: With occasional use: slings should be replaced every 5-8 years With frequent use: slings should be replaced 2-5 years. This sounds like a good policy for any other soft good (from tricams to harnesses). As you mentioned, harsher use or any sign of damage can significantly reduce this time frame. Some other resources: ...


5

I don't take a tarp to protect my tent, I take it to create another dry area outside - typically for cooking and eating. It can also create shade for cooking, eating, and just lounging around. (On a rainy day I'll lounge around in the tent if anywhere, but on a nice day there are lots of options.) Packing a wet tent won't damage it, but if your tent bag is ...


4

Generally speaking, the main differences between bouldering and top roping (unless you are an expert) is that you are likely to find yourself trying more extreme positions when bouldering. Huge generalisation, I know, but when top roping you usually look to conserve energy, assess the pitch, and make vertical gains. As a boulderer, you will be crabbing, ...


4

If you really do need exceptional accuracy, you could use the solution many Ingress players use - a good Android phone with a battery pack. In the game you often need accuracy of 2 or 3 metres - so the Galaxy S3 or a phone paired with the Nexus 7 (which has an excellend GPS) are the tools of choice. The game uses google maps and wireless navigation, as well ...


4

Inflatable pillows blow. (Get it? Ha ha! I kill me.) Seriously though - after years of battling inflatables (sticky in hot climes, slippery, hard to breathe when you are face down in them) I've found the most comfy pillow is a fleece jacket rolled loosely in a pillow case. You presumably have extra clothes with you - roll em in there too. For extra comfy - ...


4

I think the regulations are so strict because the park service wants to keep a level of discipline about how hikers manage their food, so that none is accidentally left in a pack, and the oils and crumbs from food don't contaminate a pack. This avoids scenarios where food was left in a pack unintentionally. Bears don't hunt humans except in rare cases ...



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