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1

According to wikipedia2 In calculating the R-value of a multi-layered installation, the R-values of the individual layers are added. I would imagine a slight diminishing return as the r-value is a laboratory measurement in ideal condition which is not quite the same as on the field (variable temperatures, moisture, air movement, etc.).


2

Yes, the R-value will add of your different layers. If you wear layer A with R=5 and layer B with R=2.5, the overall insulation value will be R=7.5. To explain this a bit, we think of two layers or flat walls which interact only due to thermal conduction. This is just a model and in reality other effects will come in play. The Fourier Law for thermal ...


2

From looking at the pictures I would say that for the "default" conditions at summer glacier/alpine tours they should be perfectly fine. In dry but slightly coldish conditions they will give you good grip and rope handling, as long as you don't have to dig through snow with them. The reason why you have got cold fingers while cycling might be on the one ...


0

I don't take a tent, I just take a tarp. Easier to pitch (if you have trees) In 30 years of experience (4-6 weeks per year) I've only once gotten actually wet doing this. Old tarp. Heavy rain. I pack the tarp last thing, to give it maximum drying time. If it's dry it goes in my pack. If wet, it gets rolled up in my foam pad. In the evening the ...


5

I don't take a tarp to protect my tent, I take it to create another dry area outside - typically for cooking and eating. It can also create shade for cooking, eating, and just lounging around. (On a rainy day I'll lounge around in the tent if anywhere, but on a nice day there are lots of options.) Packing a wet tent won't damage it, but if your tent bag is ...


11

You do not need a tarp in addition to the rainfly of your tent (that's what the rainfly is for). While it's always nicer to pack up a dry tent instead of a wet one, as long as you air dry the tent when you get home you'll have no problems with damaging the rainfly. If you do not dry your tent at home, it will mildew and smell really, really bad. I ...


3

While reading the answers to this question I had to disagree at some points. For example referring to @DavidR I don't think that softshells are generally less windproof than hardshells. Over the last years it seems that the manufacturers are mainly producing softshell with Gore-Tex Windstopper membrane. I wouldn't say that those jackets are really that good, ...


1

What hasn't been mentioned so far is that different materials have different ranges. A down sleeping bag is usually comfortable over quite a larger temperature range than a synthetic one. I have a flimsy synthetic liner bag (they are also available in silk, but this one claims to be microfiber) that at least avoids draft when the regular bag is better open ...


5

For cams, Black Diamond recommends: With occasional use: slings should be replaced every 5-8 years With frequent use: slings should be replaced 2-5 years. This sounds like a good policy for any other soft good (from tricams to harnesses). As you mentioned, harsher use or any sign of damage can significantly reduce this time frame. Some other resources: ...


2

I went out once with a bag that was too warm. Sometime in the night I woke up covered in sweat and freezing cold! My sweat had soaked the down, completely ruining its insulation properties. If you want to go outdoors all year round then you just have to accept that you'll be buying twice the gear. A summer pack and a winter pack. A summer sleeping bag and a ...


0

An axe is (when used properly) just as safe as any knife. On long hikes where I know campfires are gonna be a must I do actually carry a small hatchet. My axe has a fairly long handle and weights just about 0.5kg. There are smaller and lighter ones, but a light head and long handle means less to carry when walking and more leverage when using it. For ...


0

Just stating the obvious, you should consider where and when you are hiking. Death Valley and the Appalachin trail offer extremely different environments. I have multiple different sleeping bags for different occassions. In the summer, I generally use a 45 degree down bag. In spring and fall, I tend to carry a 30 degree bag, and in the winter I carry a 0 ...



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