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4

Simply put, lumens is the total amount of light coming out of the flashlight, and lux is the measure of how much of that light is focused in one area. One lux equals one lumen per square metre. If light were paint, lumens would be equal to litres, and lux would be how thickly you apply the paint. If you're only covering a small area, then you can make your ...


3

There are several features you could want or ignore in a head torch. So this answer is subjective. A good head torch should be bright of course with a good distance to it, you don't just want to be able to see a few feet in front of you. In other situations, you want a wide illuminated angle, so it would be nice to be able to toggle between this mode, and ...


1

for me I look at Amount of lumens produced Several modes (battery saving to full on light everything up) Battery life Bulkyness (or lack of!) You can get good LED torches that have all of the above these days. Small, good output and good battery life.


1

In the situation you describe, mismatched gear is not going to provide what you want. If the rain is blowing sideways and/or hard enough to get past your tarp then it will most likely also blow in the gaps inevitably left by the mismatched gear. Unfortunately the answer is the news most people least want: You have the wrong tent for what you are looking ...


2

As others suggest, it's almost certainly best to go with a backpack style kid-carrier. One option you might not know about is the Aarn Universal Balance Bag which attaches to your pack. http://www.aarnpacks.com/#!balance-bags/c1paj The balance bag counterbalances the awkward weight of a kid on your back, and gives you easy access to water, maps, hats etc ...


4

Last month I camped with my then-nine-month-old son. This was his second time sleeping in a tent with us, the first time he was four months old. It helps that my family, including our 7- and 9-year old daughters, have been camping in tents since they were infants. I'm not sure what the conditions in a hut are, so I'll give advise for tents which I should ...


7

Carrying all the gear won't be easy. Whoever has the baby will probably only be able to carry one day's worth of baby stuff and nothing else. Either you get a rucksack carrier as Russell suggested (I recommend this as well, a Deuter kid comfort fitted me and was still usable over age 2), or you wear a daypack as well as a front carrier and have 2 sets of ...


9

It's not strictly too soon. I have known plenty of people who camped with a nine month old in rougher conditions than you describe. It's too early if you are not in condition to carry a baby in addition to all of your gear. They make packs specifically for carrying wee ones. That's really the best way to go.


14

Twin ropes can be as small as 6.9mm (35g/m), and are only used in pairs; you tie into two ropes, and clip both as though they were a single rope. This provides you with the redundancy of having more than one rope, but without the weight of carrying two single ropes. Twin ropes also allow a full-rope-length rappel which often strongly factors in the choice ...


2

Mr. Wizards answer provides nice pictures supplied by Beal about what type of ropes can be used on ice/snow and rock. Quick recap: On ice/snow you can use every rope type (single, half and twin) with a single strand. If there is rock involved the single rope can still be used with one strand, while twin ropes have to be used as two strands immediately ...


2

The primary advantage of the buff (an continuous loop of fabric) is the versatility (and fashion ability) of the item over a standard scarf or hat. Features In addition to the wearable methods it can also be used as Eye Mask Facecloth Microtowel Face mask when travelling, snowboarding, desert etc Self-securing bandage/pressure pad All of which can be ...


7

As already stated several times: If you know what you need to do on a glacier, you know what material to take. The other way round does not work: Just having the necessary gear will not insure proper crevasse rescue. So your first step is to take a course or find someone experienced to show you. This is the only recommended way to do it, but that is of ...


9

about excess rope, rope length and how to split rope please see: http://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7025/2653 As you see on the picture, the two ends of the rope is devided evenly between the first and the last rope team member. If you don't know this, I guess you don't know how to rescue someone in case of crevasse fall. You should really learn it by ...


3

I have a couple of buffs - one is made of polartec with a piece of thin fabric attached, and another one is just the same thin fabric. I've found the first one to be very useful in winter because: it is very easy to put on and off; on a hike you can put it off for while you're moving and take on for a stop; this also comes very handy on climbing routes ...


2

I use Buffs a lot. If you are out on the water fishing, a buff worn like a bandit mask combined with a big hat will save you a sunburn. I wear a one as a headscarf during long hikes. It keeps the sweat out of my eyes and I soak it in organic bug repellent to keep the gnats away. For winter hikes, I again use as a bandit mask to keep my face warm and prevent ...


9

The only answer is to go to a store and try on the sack for real. Take your actual gear to try with it, and use your normal packing technique. Try to choose a store with a trained fitter. Then take it home on appro and try it around the house for a few hours so you can return it if it doesn't carry well for you. It's worth the effort - a badly fitting pack ...


2

I'm not a materials scientist, so can't give you a definitive answer. But I do know that if you make your own silnylon or silpoly by soaking the base fabric in a solution of silicone and mineral spirit and air-drying, the final material is far less slippery than commercial silnylon/silpoly. So it seems that the slippery finish of the commercial materials ...


1

Something like this is probably more likely to be marketed as a 'pouch' than a 'mini-backpack'. A search for 'belt pouch' or 'utility pouch' on ebay will get you what you want.


3

These aren't exactly the style of backpack you asked for, but I knew I'd seen something visually similar. There are some outdoors camera cases that are basically mini-backpacks with carabiners. They've even got places on the outside of the packs for attaching more carabiners or other items. The two best examples I could find are here: Ricoh Adventure ...


5

The closest thing to what you look for are "cpr keychains". You might also search for "mini backpack keychains" to find similar results near you. Here some some stores that offer similar products: https://www.werbegeschenk.de/schluesselanhaenger/mit-geldboerse/schluesselanhaenger-mini-rucksack-104124 ...


1

It is a common expectation that, like in your daily routine, you can expect to keep your feet nice and dry for an entire multi-day hike. Gear manufacturers contribute to this perception by promoting equipment as waterproof, breathable, etc. The fact is, if it rains, you can't. There are a number of reasons why: Your shoe requires a big hole in it to put ...


6

I think it can be a matter of personal taste, however: Some people craft their own knifes, and using a paracord wrap as handle is easy to do, and easy to redo. There are some more and some less good looking wrap styles - again, personal taste. This also applies when it comes to knifes you buy in a store. Some may like the paracord wrap just as you like ...


12

Upsides It "looks cool" (to some) Cordage (but arguably useless as you have noted) Downsides Poor grip (compared to leather and manufactured alternatives) More likely to cause blisters Less durable, requires more maintenance PITA to clean if it gets messy/dirty/sweaty Once you unwrap the cord to use it, your knife has even worse grip. IMO - It's a ...


1

I guess the answer really is It depends As a general purpose solution I normally bring sturdy trekking/hiking sandals on my trips. Something like the models from Teva for example (many pictures on Google). I specifically look for models with have sturdy rubber soles with good profiles, and which come with velcro straps that I can fasten/adjust quickly and ...


1

For the UK in spring where you expect river crossings there is an argument for just using boots which dry fast eg unlined fabric and leather construction as these also have the advantage of being more breathable in general. If that is not to your taste then the traditional canvas and rubber plimsoles are as good as anything for river crossings as the ...


2

Merrell make several excellent shoes which are designed to be lightweight running shoes and I believe they would fit your use case neatly. Unlike sandals they offer a fully enclosed toe for greater protection, with synthetic and mesh upper and drainage ports in the sole. They're often designed to be worn sockless and so fit the foot closely to minimise ...



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