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-1

The rond sled are the fastest and the funnest your kids would love them. The are usually 5$ to 8$.


1

Years ago in college I took an outdoor rock-climbing class, and what I bought for it were shoes and chalk. I didn't buy anything else, as the ropes and belaying equipment were already provided by the instructor when we went out to climb. Chances are pretty good that if you go with a group of people, someone already has ropes and harnesses.


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While both materials do have slightly different properties, either one will work in the scenario mentioned. In-fact, any sling with the UIAA stamp of approval will likely have a working strength of 22kn - more force than you will ever be able to generate by falling if being belayed by a rope. The latter part is important, because the rope (among other ...


2

For outdoor single-pitch climbing, a pretty bare minimum is: shoes, harness, belay device, locking carabiner, helmet, nut tool This assumes that you're climbing with someone who owns a rope. Harnesses are pretty generic. Shoes are theoretically not necessary, since people climbed some pretty hard routes in the 1930s in hobnailed boots, but realistically ...


1

Get the best fit possible. Then go with the soak them and walk them dry method. Wetting the leather softens it and as it drys the leather shrinks to your foot shape. And at the first sign of blisters stand in a stream. Removes heat and lubricates the area.


3

Youth, conditioning, and a great attitude towards safety, common sense, and pushing yourself. Safety first. Dead climbers don't get do-overs. You can die very easily at twenty feet up on a 5.6 beginner route. I saw the consequences, his dying body in front of me and his distraught wife just..broken, maybe forever. You don't "get" that reality probably until ...


2

I use pneumatic hosing, something like this: http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-plastic-and-rubber-tubing/=uowues It's super cheap (runs under a dollar/foot and a foot is more than you will need) and you can buy as short of a section you want at most hardware stores.


7

It is a self-locking descender with other uses as well. The official page by the manufacturer states that it's not only meant to be used on canyoning: Multiuse descender device, the only one in the world which can be opened under load. Multi-purpose device suitable for canyoning, special forces, rescue and military application. As a descender it ...


12

It's a self-belay device for rappelling that works just like a simple figure-eight, but there is a configuration where the lever on the left allows you to release yourself under load. It's meant for canyoning, so you can rappel down some distance before taking a plunge into a pool that's a bit further down than your are comfortable with jumping directly. ...


4

While the answers above mainly focus on getting a Easy-To-Carry (new) instrument, I'll stick to an attempt of answering how can one carry a standard guitar like the one I have (a Pluto, acoustic). EDIT: As the question was having an edit about travelling guitars, I am afraid I have no experience with them, but I'd rather think that same packing technique ...


1

You should get a lapstick. I don't imagine that you're going to be able to find anything more convenient or compact than this thing is. The best way to ensure your guitar stays in good shape on outdoor trips is to never expose it to the elements. Play it in your tent and only bring it outside when it's clear and calm out, never put it on the dirty or snowy ...


2

My solution to this is a Hohner G3T and a 1 Watt Marshall amp. The Hohner fits easily down the side of my bigger rucksacks, and the amp is tiny. They don't add a huge amount to the weight of my pack If the weather is wet I'll wrap them both in a plastic bag, but they have entertained me on many Munro tops. I have never had any wildlife attracted to the ...


1

As EverythingRightPlace writes, you should focus on all your body parts. To survive the Polar Vortex you need: Winter boots. These should comprise of an outer boot and a removable inner boot. The inner boot should be well insulated from the outer boot. Trousers. You should wear long underpants, down-filled trousers and a wind stopper over that. Down ...


3

I have friends who swear by silk inners. They are thin, so can be worn under other gloves, but are extremely warm for the thickness. Combine these with windstopper outers - as mentioned elsewhere, layering is good practice. On the downside, silk is really expensive, at least where I live. On the upside, silk lasts a long time and doesn't get smelly.


5

If the suggestions in Everything's answer don't work, try these heating options: Heated gloves (I have linked to an example) Hand warmer packs to tuck into your gloves My wife has Reynaud's which leads to poor circulation in fingers and toes, so needs to use these solutions on occasion, and they are very effective.


11

Some general rules: layer system also for the hands is a good idea but those gardening gloves won't work pretty well better use inner liner gloves (wool or even a softshell glove) and a warm mitten as the outer layer to avoid cooling off use hats (again use a layer-system) including a warm winter hat which covers the ears (also see this about heat loss ...


3

As you stated in your question, there are many different Tyvek fabrics, some are only water resistant, whereas others are completely waterproof (such as is used for express mail envelopes and printing materials). There are lots of forums online that discuss the use of Tyvek tarps for backpacking, to determine how water resistant your fabric is you need to ...


1

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...


1

1) Can rinse items off. 2) A dog can use it. :) Someone gave one (Geigerrig "Rig 500") to me as a gift since he had leftovers from an event. The reservoir had a traditional water reservoir (clear) and a separate air reservoir (blue), which was inflated with a small shoulder mounted pump. Image below but picture the one used for taking your blood ...


5

There are obvious pros and cons. When hiking, I've never come across a situation where I want to have water as quick as possible in a quantity. For me using a hydration pack, on a never-ending ascend, is to make sure that I don't have to stop for long. I can take an optional pause every 200 steps, to sip some water, take a look around, take a picture and ...



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