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31

After a bit of digging I found this, which covers some in Europe (not extensively as I first thought!) It's worth pointing out that while for some (and probably most people here) wild camping means free-camping wandering around with a tent and supplies on foot, for many others it can mean driving around and parking up somewhere in a motor home. I refer to ...


15

It's allowed in Sweden. It's called Allemansrätten.


14

Generally in England and Wales it is illegal to wild camp anywhere without prior permission from the land owner. Although some UK national parks are more tolerant than others!! In my experience certainly in the English and Welsh national parks it is tolerated as long as you are not seen and you leave no trace including not starting any fires. For more ...


13

I'm not sure you can generalize US Hiking trails, since there will be vast variability in popularity, usage, land area, population density etc. (Just as you mentioned is the case in popular vs. remote areas of Europe). Yes, there are some areas that require reservations, but most don't. In fact, I feel comfortable saying MOST federal public land in the ...


12

This is a pure theory, if you're asking about permission... you have to understand that the rules and laws are set up for people that park 3 cars, make 5 big tents, lot of noise and leave a lot of rubish. Practically, when you are a good outdoor person, quiet and never leaving any rubish behind you, and you need just sleep for one night somewhere with just a ...


10

Be very careful as far as schools are concerned - parents or staff will tend to be rather vigilant with strangers on site (especially primary schools) and I believe without permission it is technically trespassing. Geocaches really shouldn't be placed in such areas without written permission anyway, so for some that have done this you might be ok (though ...


10

In Scotland, it is allowed, with conditions. http://walking.visitscotland.com/usefulinfo/wild-camping One restriction that I know of is that camping is not allowed on the eastern shore of Loch Lomond. There are likely to be restrictions during the hunting season as well, there are phone lines where you can find out about hunting activities.


9

I feel only qualified to answer the first portion of your question: When you are in a rural area, just ask if someone lets you set up camp on their property. Farmers often don't mind. Whenever I had the chance to do it this way I did. I sleep a lot sounder not thinking about police officers waking me up at 6AM and you are interacting with the local ...


9

I can not give a lot of information about hitchhiking but have spend a lot of time wildcamping in Europe. Sure most land is privatly owned, and most countries have regulations against it, but in most cases you will be fine and undisturbed if you take some things into account: Try to hide your tent, only set it up right before you want to go sleep. Find a ...


9

I have so far not been hiking close to Berlin. However, I know to areas that might be worth a try: The Spreewald and the Mecklenburger Seenplatte. Also I just learned about the "Märkische Schweiz", a small low mountain range. I have never heard of the 66 lakes trail, so I can´t give you information on that. Note that you can reach the baltic sea in about ...


9

It's not a myth. In Sweden allemansrätten (lit. "the everyman's right") is a freedom granted by the Constitution of Sweden. Since 1994 the Instrument of Government says that notwithstanding the right to own property "everyone shall have access to nature in accordance with allemansrätten" source: Wiki You are allowed to use nature but you are also ...


7

don't wild camp in Italy. In most cities it is illegal, and more important it is highly dangerous. Depending on the area, you may be mugged, raped, stabbed, or flash flooded by a torrent of mud.


7

Camping restrictions and permits to enter particular areas are actually very rare when you look at the total land area. I believe in every case these are done only to prevent degradation caused by excessive use. By definition, these systems are therefore in place in popular areas, which is why you hear about them way out of proportion to their actual size ...


7

Swimming is a popular summer pas-time in Sweden and Finland. In rural areas, it's still common for schools to have swimming lessons outside, in lakes. I'm pretty sure there's no risk from fauna in Swedish lakes. If you go too far north, you could risk hypothermia ;).


7

Unfortunately being Europe the situation changes from country to country. But I will try and keep my answer as general as possible. I most places wild camping is not allowed. Main exceptions are Scotland and Nordic countries and some other places where its illegal but widely tolerated. I Alpine and other mountainous areas (except in UK) there is a ...


6

I think it is not that simple. There are several things to keep in mind when making comparisons like this: As far as the US are concerned, you are talking about the most popular national parks here: places like Yosemite, Yellowstone or Zion get few millions of visitors each year, from all over the world. At the same time, there are huge stretches of ...


6

In Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland You can camp almost anywhere in forest and near public waters. Latvia is forest country, and You can camp almost anywhere. There are no restrictions. If the land owner doesn't want to allow it, he must place a sign. There are restrictions on national parks only. In national parks it's allowed in specific places only, but ...


6

Camping If you're walking with a tent and pitching it up somewhere high in the mountains (this may not be legal, but if you're well behaved nothing will happen), you won't have a problem with crowds. Very few people hike with a tent. In general, as soon as you're more than ~2 hours from the nearest car park, you're out of the crowds. That being said, it ...


6

Its nearly just the half of what you would have expected to see. Honestly I had head-scratched many details for European Long Distance Trails. But I realized that they are so long that even if I plan to complete one of them in sections, it would take multiple years considering my current economic state :-) By the time I realized that,I already had some data ...


5

I can only answer Switzerland. It's illegal to "wildcamp" but however most ground belongs to Farmers which can be asked anytime, and most of them will let you.


5

I think this is also called "Freedom to roam". Here is a list of countries with detailed information of what is allowed and not allowed around Europe: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_to_roam


5

Having just returned from our trip, I will try to provide a description of how we planned it and how things worked out. When we arrived in Vienna we purchased a topographic map of the Gesause region at a book store. With this in hand, we decided to take a train from Vienna to Gaishorn am See, to the south of the park. The train takes three hours and isn't ...


5

Yes, Europe has an international accepted definition of Wilderness. These European Wilderness Quality Standards are continuously updated and are available on the Website of the European Wilderness Society (http://wilderness-society.org). During the last years the society identified close to one million hectares in Europe that meet at least the bronze ...


5

As gerrit notes, swimming in lakes is common in Scandinavia, and there's not a lot of fauna in them that could even potentially be harmful. Some lakes in southern Sweden apparently do have leeches, which can attach themselves to exposed human skin or, in some cases, to the insides of body cavities. If you were planning to swim in a leech-infested lake (a ...


4

Living in Utah in the US I have a somewhat unique perspective (Utah has more national parks then any other state) I have visited all of the national parks here and most throughout the west. As others have mentioned if you compare the amount of reservations and restrictions to the amount of space the ratio is actually quite small. I thought I would answer ...


4

In Serbia it is legal and everywhere is free.


4

One such resource would the website of the Alpenverein. On their website, you can find an intercative hut-finding service. If you click on any of the huts, you will get detailed information about opening dates, services available, possibly a link to a website, etc. Most of this information is in German. If you can't read German, you might try Google ...


4

There are two problems with this question: Night-time temperatures vary a great deal across Spain-it is a big country, with coasts, plains and mountains Your ideal temperature may be very different to mine So what you want to do is look at the range of expected temperatures in the area you plan to camp, compare those with temperatures you are comfortable ...


4

This is an extremely long trail. Very good walkers are able to do 30-50 km (depending on weather and terrain) each day for a very long time. But for seasoned (though physically very fit) walker a realistic estimate is on avg. 25 km/day. So for 7000 km you would need 280 days. According to the article on outdoorseiten.de the trail part in Romania is not done ...


4

A general answer to a general question Long distance through hiking is a fairly well developed activity in terms of common best practices. I would suggest picking up a book on more popular through trails (The Appalachian Trail or Pacific Crest trail in the U.S.) that has many handy suggestions. Take from it what you will based on the terrain you will cover. ...



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