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7

Unfortunately being Europe the situation changes from country to country. But I will try and keep my answer as general as possible. I most places wild camping is not allowed. Main exceptions are Scotland and Nordic countries and some other places where its illegal but widely tolerated. I Alpine and other mountainous areas (except in UK) there is a ...


6

Its nearly just the half of what you would have expected to see. Honestly I had head-scratched many details for European Long Distance Trails. But I realized that they are so long that even if I plan to complete one of them in sections, it would take multiple years considering my current economic state :-) By the time I realized that,I already had some data ...


6

The American Alpine club publishes this data for North America annually, though it's unlikely to cover all accidents. One of the best visualizations of this data I've found is from Steph Abegg: Mountaineering Accident Statistics and Mount Rainier Accident Statistics.


5

I don't have my copy of How to Survive in Avalanche Terrain in front of me, but one of the things that stood out to me relating to this is the wide variety of avalanche climates that exists not just from country to country but from mountain to mountain. You've got intermountain, continental, and maritime avalanche climates all with their own habits and ...


4

Bears behave differently in places where they are used to a lot of human activity vs places where they are generally left alone. They learn and adapt. For example, in the Adirondacks in NY, bears have become adept at recognizing and grabbing human food from "bear bags" (food hung from a tree, theoretically out of reach on a limb that won't support the bear's ...


3

I don't know of a source for Europe, but The American Alpine Club published "Accidents in North American Mountaineering" annually. Published annually since 1948, Accidents in North American Mountaineering reports on the year’s most significant and teachable climbing incidents. In each case, the American Alpine Club analyzes what went wrong, helping you ...


3

Some of the things you've listed as precautions used in the US are not real or not reasonable. worry about the tent or shirt you sleep in smelling after food from 6 months ago This is silly. bear bells This is a joke. Using a bear canister, on the other hand, is reasonable and in fact legally required in some national parks in the US. But what ...


2

After taking a look into it, it appears that the grizzly bears in North America are actually a sub species (ssp.) of European brown bear. Brown Bear = Ursus arctos Grizzly Bear = Ursus arctos ssp. U. a. californicus (Recently extinct California Grizzly) U. a. gyas (Peninsular Grizzly) U. a. horribilis (Mainland Grizzly) U. a. middendorffi (Kodiak ...


2

Presuming you're planning on eating at/near your vehicle you're not really limited by the weight or bulk of the food. So, anything you can easily cook in 1 or 2 pots is a good bet. Generally, I have some version of pasta/rice/couscous and sauce. You can make your own sauce if you can get fresh ingredients or get reasonably cheap jars or dried packets. I ...


2

This slightly depends on size and heat output or your stove, but camping stoves are universally good at one thing, heating water. So this makes them ideal for using with dyhydrated food's. These have come a long way from super and pot noodles and you can now get some pretty decent tasty food that you simply have to add water too, there are a couple of good ...


2

It is generally illegal in Denmark. You may sleep on all beaches, but you are not allowed to pitch a tent on beaches. In some state-forrests you may camp where you like. More than 1.000 primitive campsites are scattered around the country. Most are free - some cost 1-3 euro pr. night. They may just be a lawn but some have shelters, firewood and access to ...


2

My wife and I have just returned from a week of hiking in and near the eastern Pyrenees, starting from Foix, having flown in to Toulouse. From there we did three days on the Sentier Cathar, which follows the route of the GR107, then a day south on the GR107 to Ax les Thermes, where we spent a very pleasant day. Then we spent three days on the Carlit Massif, ...


2

While it does not account for the difference between Canada and the USA, I'm pretty sure that one reason for the low numbers in Europe is that the latter has a lot of seasonal mountain pastures in active use, so livestock grazing keeps many slopes completely free of trees: In fact, the word "Alps" for Europe's main mountain range is related to the words ...


1

I wouldn't read too much into any avalanche statistic. While there may be plausible reasons behind the difference, the data sizes are just too small to make any reliable comparisons. Avalanches are exceptional events and avalanches that involve injuries that get reported are even more exceptional events. When you look at statistics based on infrequent ...



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