Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

In addition to using a Finger exerciser, I do the following: Squeezing plasticene or stress balls Dumb-bell curls Chin-ups, both on a bar, and finger chin-ups on a door frame or similar Press-ups on fingertips These give finger, hand, wrist and forearm strength - worthwhile using them together. The thing I'm not so good at is toughening up the backs of ...


11

Climbing is the best exercise for finger and hand strength improvement, just make sure to warm up and stretch. EDIT: Just want to defend my answer. There are a lot of books out there you can read about climbing for training. Many of them will tell you not to waste your time cross training. The best training for climbing, is climbing. Now if you are ...


10

There’s no better hiking excercise than hiking :) Seriously, if you can walk to work, with your dog, to the shop, do it. Regularly. If you have some time during the weekend, go out for a few kilometers. Running is also fun, and depending on the weather where you live, you could easily run through the whole year. Running will build up some strength in your ...


8

If you haven't climbed in a while I would recommend staying away from doing fingertip pull-ups on hang boards. My assumption is that you are out of climbing shape and tendons and ligaments are easy to injure and take a long time to heal. This is coming from someone who has been climbing for around 8 years off and on and has made many mistakes, please learn ...


7

I don't have a lot of experience with cracks myself (I refuse to make my feet hurt, and so far I haven't found a way around that), but I found these videos quite helpful in getting the basic jams correct: Wild Country Crack School with Tom Randall & Pete Whittaker Each video (except the newest ones: #7 Advanced Fingers, and #8 Advanced Hands) is ...


6

There are three things you should look at here, lung capacity, oxygen carrying capacity and bradycardia reflex. Lung Capacity When I was younger I suffered from asthma, and had a series of lung exercises to improve lung capacity. I can't remember them all now so I checked various sites. This one has some excellent tips, including: Rib stretch Abdominal ...


6

The best practice for climbing is to actually go climbing. I have wasted both time and money experimenting with training setups at home for practicing climbing, and I have mostly been disappointed. Since then I have transitioned my efforts at home to staying in shape for climbing (slightly different from what you are asking.) Unless you want to spend ...


6

Skiing is a full-body, high endurance, activity. Being in good cardio-vascular shape is important, and can be achieved through running, swimming, rowing, etc... This can not be over-emphasized. Get your heart in shape. Assuming you already are in decent shape, here are some exercises that will help you get through those initial days on the hill. I've chosen ...


6

As I noted in my answer to that question, plasticene or stress balls work. Also, you can use guitarist's finger exercisers I do like your idea of using less fingers for carrying bags etc.


5

Train by hiking, start small, do it every week. After my injury, when I could not hike, I started by hiking less than a mile, but I did it every week. Even only once a week, this will help. Pick a trail that's a length just a little hard for you. This is best if you have a nearby park with lots of interlocking trails. Interlocking is good because you ...


5

The most common for rock climbing are with fingerboards or campus boards. Without those, you can perform dead hangs on anything you can hold onto, such as pullup bars. To make it a little more difficult, you can dead hang on the edges of doorways. There are other handheld devices for grip strengthening, such as tiger claws. Lastly, wrist curls with ...


5

Building Grip Strength Your best chances to improve your fingertip strength is performing excercises specific to those ligaments at or near body weight. Balls, rings, and grip springs are good for warming up, but not increasing strength. But you need to be careful if you are just starting out because you can easily injure yourself by overtraining. Please ...


4

If I already had the right to vote I would give a +1 to Patrick Scott's answer. Probably the best hand and finger exercises that help with climbing are the ones actively performed while climbing! And the key to strengthen fingers as best as possible, is to actively work on different styles of climbing. In other words, trying all kinds of imaginable grips! ...


4

Whilst walking about, clench your fist, then stretch your hand open again. repeat this 30 times (or whatever you want) and relax. Bit by but, maybe one or two a day, increase the reps. Vary for speed and power. You can do this whilst walking around.


3

As an assistant instructor, I suspect it's your relaxation rate. New divers, and those who haven't been diving for a while, tend to get more excited when diving, and may also try to see the whole ocean. Try slowing down and taking a closer look at what's around you. Ironically, you'll usually see more when going slow because you'll notice the small things ...


3

I am not a medical professional and can only offer you anecdotal experience. I have had great success preparing for the ski season by running on steep hills. I found the biggest hills nearby and run on them 2-4 days a week. At first, your legs and your lungs will be killing you. But you will gain muscular and cardiovascular stamina after a couple months. ...


2

As well as squeezing stress balls and pulling on fingerboards, I bought a powerball a few years ago after one of my friends lent me his. It really helps with the wrist and forearm, and if you get the RPM counter, you can have a bit of fun, too.


2

Like others have said, the best training to hike is hiking. If you are concerned about being able to climb large vertical distances (mountains?), try climbing stairs. I don't mean the stair-climber at the gym (although it does help), but put on a pack with weight and find a tall building. Clear this with any security the building may have (or ...


2

As others have mentioned, the best exercise you can get is simply hiking. To train for weight, it's recommended to fill the backpack with water or sand that can be thrown out at the top to prevent knee injuries. If you live in the flatlands like I do, there's not much elevation changes. The closest in the gym is to use an incline treadmill or a stepmill. ...


2

Stair running and squats are the key exercises I do before a skiing holiday By stair running I just mean multiple reps up and down stairs. This is easy to do at the office - if you are on the 10th floor, try running up and down 10 or 15 times during your lunch break. Deep squats, with or without a small weight, help to develop the thigh muscles you will ...


1

Personally I would say regular exercise routine with swimming and cardio will help improve your air consumption. But the best exercise for scuba diving is more scuba diving. The more you dive, the more comfortable you will be and the more efficient your movements become underwater the lower your breathing rate will become. practice not using your ...


1

This is a common question for beginners to ask. Climbing feels overwhelmingly strenuous when you're starting out. There are a variety of exercises that are recommended to strengthen your fingers, I can enumerate them below, but some are given in other answers. But I want to emphasize the following: If you have access to a climbing gym, or live somewhere ...


1

It all depends on how far you want to hike! Its probably good to do stretching before any exercise such as hiking or running! Lunges and squats may also help as well. Although you may look a bit silly in the gym, you could carry a backpack on a treadmill and use it on an incline to strengthen your legs. I would also considering doing short burst of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible