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19

I've never succeed in "hardening" my feet against blisters, even when I was barefoot growing up. However these things have worked for me Vaseline or (preferably) diaper rash ointment before putting on socks Injinji toe socks (If I double socks, these are always my base layer) These worked on long hikes even when my feet got wet, and even in poorly ...


17

After dealing with a lot of wet feet issues I have learned some tricks. Keeping feet dry While hiking, use gaitors that come above your socks and divert water away from the wicking material. Keep your boots well oiled, using a product like Nikwax, or minkoil. This keeps the leather from absorbing water as much. In normal conditions (not marsh hiking) use ...


8

In answer to the original question: There are several products on the market designed for dogs with sore paw pads. These are often wax based, and adhere to the skin to provide some protection. (Google: Dog Paw Wax). Super-glue bonds well to skin, and can provide a layer of protection. A medically sterile version called "liquid stitches" in used in the ...


6

This is one of the reasons I always hike with at least one extra pair of socks and tend to wear shoes that shed water quickly as opposed to being water proof. If you're in a consistently wet environment there really isn't much you can do as it won't really help to change your socks every 10 minutes as they keep getting soaked. Just make sure that when you ...


6

Carry extra socks and a couple of kitchen-sized trash bags. When you soak a shoe or boot, squeeze out the wet sock and let it start drying on the back of the pack. Put on a dry sock. Then put the trash back over the dry sock, and put your foot, sock, and trash bag inside your wet shoe. After a while your shoe will dry out a little, maybe enough that you no ...


6

As an interim step, have you tried the Vibram Five Fingers running shoes - these still have protection under your feet, but give a lot of freedom as they are very thin. This could let you see how you get on.


6

If you're going to walk outside barefoot then my advice is to just go with it - build up the strength on short distances and eventually you shouldn't have an issue with hiking long distances just barefoot. This article claims someone who hiked around South Island barefoot, so it's definitely possible, but I wouldn't try that straight away! If you decide you ...


6

Yes, you should seek medical expertise. From healthcentral.com: When the skin has thawed and rewarming is complete, cover the damaged skin with bandages and warm clothing. Contact your doctor or go to an emergency room.


5

What you want is called "skin". However, that's not something you just add on one day and go hiking for days. Keep in mind that our species evolved to get around by walking and running with our feet. Our feet have evolved to handle that. Unfortunately, habitually wearing shoes eliminates the stimuli that the feet need to produce the necessary thick skin ...


5

Try running on sand for your morning or evening run - sand is very good at early stages of toughening up your feet as it still spreads the load well. Once you have toughened the skin a bit, you will be able to walk on forest trails, stone, gravel etc. But for now, the best thing you can do is moisturise your feet - this helps the cracks smooth out so they ...


5

I do a few things that have helped: Wear liner socks inside the wool socks. Wear Gore-Tex boots. I dry my feet and socks when I set up camp. If I end up getting a blister, I duct tape it.


3

know if you will be going through marshy areas. If you are hiking in the Everglades, pack more socks than if you will be hiking through the Sahara. If you have to cross a river, try to not cross in your boots. There is a favorite trail in my area, and it ends with crossing a waist-deep river. I'll drop pack, change into my trail-sandals, stuff the socks ...


3

I do a few things and they are helping very much: Walk around in Barefoot Running Shoes. You don't have to get the freaky ones with the separated toes. I have ones that look like normal sneakers. Learn the fox walk Wear double socks. One thin pair and one normal pair. The friction will get distributed. Try to walk slower and enjoy the hike by paying more ...


2

I have gone on several barefoot day hikes and really enjoyed it. Easy peasy. I have a couple of thoughts for you: Barefoot hiking is fun. I never ran into any problems. If you want to be extra safe, maybe start running barefoot on weekdays. That will build up the callouses on your feet and really help out. I agree with Rory Alsop. Just buy a pair of ...


1

Just to add to PPL's answer. The UK National Health Service has good practical advice on this also. It's available here. But to summarise some of the relevant points: Treatment for frostbite depends on how severe your symptoms are. You should always seek medical attention if you suspect you or someone else has frostbite. If symptoms are severe, ...


1

I lifeguarded in a beach for many years where the beach was covered in iron ore pieces, kind of like walking on crushed glass mixed with sand. It wasn't painful but it did hurt and tried to avoid when possible. By the end of the summer my feet were tough enough that I have stepped on glass about 1 inch in size and it does not puncture.


1

Stop PAMPERING Your Feet if you Want Them TOUGHER! Not sure what you mean by "liner socks", but one of the worst footwear mistakes a hiker can make is wearing TWO pairs of socks. I would sincerely advise against two pairs of socks, if that is what was advised above. Most seasoned distance hikers and runners would tell you that, or ask yourself after doing a ...


1

Surgical spirit works every time. Rub it in using cotton wool for a month before you hit the trail. The best blister prevention is to walk, walk and walk.


1

I've read about using rubbing alcohol to harden them up, but never done it. I usually wear silk or poly socks inside the self-wicking hydrophilic/hydrophibic layered socks. When I get a blister, I lance, drain, debride it, and then put a protective layer of superglue over it. It works.


1

Overboots are a solution I don't see above. Some fabric based ones take up less space in the pack than an extra set of boots, and they can be taken off relatively easily when the rain abates or when you have cleared a marshy area. In warm weather on reasonable trails, Vibram Fivefinger shoes are quite comfortable even when wet, because when sized properly ...



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