Hot answers tagged

33

Here is a good article on the types of rocks that explode: http://www.ehow.com/list_7360348_rocks-explode-around-fire-pits.html Generally if you rub two of the same rocks together and they crumble easily, then they are not safe to use. Hard rocks: The following rocks are not very likely to explode, but should be approached with with common sense. When ...


29

There's two main things that generally cause this, the first being the moisture content in the rock and the second being the type of rock. If the rock is wet and you heat it rapidly, any water will turn to steam and put pressure on the rock, forcing shards of it to break off rapidly. Secondly the type of rock matters, layered rocks such as sandstone are much ...


27

There are many, many ways to make a fire. Some require more skill, while others depend on carefully prepared equipment. The closest thing to "rubbing two sticks together" is the hand-drill. You will need a fireboard (a small cedar board is good) and a thin, straight stick. A knife is good, too. This takes a lot of practice. Hand callouses help. YouTube has ...


25

Wool does not melt or drip This answer might surprise you: wool! Wool (...) does not melt or drip(.) Wool ignites at a higher temperature than cotton and some synthetic fibers. It has a lower rate of flame spread, a lower rate of heat release, a lower heat of combustion, and does not melt or drip; it forms a char which is insulating and self-...


23

You need to: Make sure the embers are cool. This is the most important thing you should do, regardless of anything else. If the embers are still warm, there's always the chance they'll spark up again in a strong wind with the right fuel. Embers can take hours to cool off, but if you put your fire out before you go to bed, they should be cool in the morning....


23

It's difficult to tell exactly how long wood you've gathered will last you, unless as an expert you can gauge an accurate estimate due to the type of wood, weather conditions and other contributing factors (theoretically possible, but above my ability level.) However, there are different ways of constructing a fire, and one in particular is designed to burn ...


23

Basically tin foil is your friend! Even though you could also place some of these foods directly on the embers, if you're willing to carry some tin foil and do a little bit of preparation, you can create some awesome meals on a campfire. Potatoes Image by Ryan Dickey Slice them open unpeeled and fill them with cream cheese Season with salt, chives, ...


19

This does have a basis in a known technique, back burning, but by your description the application wasn't orthodox. From Wikipedia: Back burning is a way of reducing the amount of flammable material during a bushfire by starting small fires along a man made or natural firebreak in front of a main fire front. It is called back burning because the ...


18

Just got around to trying out some experiments, and so far it seems to be pretty robust. In most of the things I've tried, it lit immediately and was consumed entirely, no need to re-light (except for the wet test, I'll mention below). I used a lighter, so I can't be certain other methods (flint, bow, etc.) will ignite it as well, but given how quickly it ...


18

To get a long lasting fire, you have to limit the cumbustion somehow. Think embers as apposed to much flame. Wood stoves are specifically engineered to allow you to control the rate of combustion. This is done by controlling the air intake to the fire, which limits oxygen, which limits the combustion rate. A wood stove can be built nicely sealed, so the ...


18

Cooking raw brats over a fire is only dodgy because cooking brats well requires fairly precise (for a campfire) temperature control. Even with hot dogs, it can be a bit challenging to get the whole thing consistently cooked through without burning the outside. With a bratwurst, its larger size makes that especially difficult without some skill or tools. If ...


18

Fires must be attended at all times! There is no such thing as, "the best way to leave a fire unattended for a short time," your fire is either being attended, or your fire is thoroughly extinguished and your pit is left cold, no argument. There are no conditions where an open pit fire can be left alone and be 100% guaranteed not to spread. It's the people ...


17

Like many questions, this will depend somewhat on your location. For example, some soils will keep coals dry while allowing them enough oxygen to smolder. Some woods produce longer-lasting coals or more insulating ash. Get to know your location. Discuss the question with other fire-makers in your area. Still, there are probably some general guidelines to ...


17

Make a big fire. This may sound silly and couterintuitive, but the reason is pretty simple. If you make a small fire you need to put your stuff pretty close to it to have any chance of drying it in a decent amount of time. And if you put clothes or boots near the fire, then you concretely risk to burn them. While if you make a bigger fire, your equipment ...


16

Another one would be Damper, an Australian bush bread traditionally cooked in the hot ashes of a dying fire, with or without tin-foil (just don’t eat the crust). It has a pretty delicious smokey taste and is fun to make with the kids. I won’t suggest a particular recipe because there are so many variations. The core is just flour, baking soda, salt, and ...


15

I suggest using a bow drill. It's a little tricky to start, but once you get the hang of it you can get pretty good at it. For wood selections, you generally want to stick with the following: Obviously Dry. You should be able to press into the wood. If you can't at all then it's too hard. However, if you can make a fingertip-sized depression then it's ...


15

I'm from British Columbia, lots of BC is technically a rain forest, which pretty much means you're always starting your fire with wet wood. The trick to getting wet wood to light is to generate a lot of heat when you first start your fire, that means using lots of extra kindling. Cut triple or quadruple the amount of fine kindling and build yourself a ...


14

If you absolutely must have a fire, reset your thinking from "fire pit" to "fire mound" Creating a fire mound is a great way to enjoy a back-country fire with little to no impact to the ground / vegetation. Carry a small sheet of plastic, burlap, or a section of an old fire shelter, or anything of the like (it shouldn't get hot enough to burn if your ...


14

If you think about it, lighting a kerosene lamp with a flint and steel is essentially the same as lighting a Zippo Lighter. The classic of classic lighters has a flammable-fluid soaked wick that is ignited by a small flint and steel. The only significant difference is that Kerosene has a slightly higher flashpoint than Lighter Fluid (Naphtha). Lighter ...


13

All land in the UK is owned by somebody, therefore, all trees and their produce (including firewood) are owned by somebody. You could be charged with theft if you take logs, kindling etc. without permission. The Jeremy Vine Show on BBC Radio 2 on 6th January 2012 discussed this very topic following the storms in the UK around that time, that left a lot of ...


13

It depends on what you are cooking Make sure you know your wood. Some woods produce toxic fumes. Others will produce a very unpleasant taste. What woods to use is a topic of it's own. If you are just roasting on a stick, that's all you need to know. Just get a flame and roast. However if you have other things... If you have space and a camp shovel,...


13

First, lets dispel a common myth: Rock fire rings do absolutely nothing to contain, corral, or control a fire. That being said, a fire needs 3 things: air, fuel, and heat. An overabundance of one will create an uncontrollable fire. Thus, keep the following in mind: Consult the local fire conditions. Public lands agencies will rate the fire conditions. ...


12

I found this image. I think this is good method since you can prep several signal structures depending where in your camp you are, and where the help might be approaching from. The bigger it is the more smoke it will produce. This way you just have to keep small fire going and, when you need to, you will light up the structures. Sometimes it is not the ...


12

This sounds like an "escape fire" (Wikipedia); see also the Mann Gulch Fire for a real life example. One of the The Gods Must Be Crazy movies had this technique used in a wildfire in the African savannah.


12

I think this largely depends on the specific area you are traveling in. My approach is to always minimize campfires in the backcountry as a general rule. That being said, if I am in an abundant backcountry environment, where there is an already well made fire ring, I have no qualms making an occasional fire from dead, down, dry, and less than wrist size ...


12

Having built several fires while wearing down jackets I can confirm that your jacket will not burst into flames, nylon is not that flammable. The worst you will experience is a small burn hole in the outside if an ember lands on you. Probably still a good idea to keep a safe distance away anyway there are plenty of other ways to burn yourself on a fire. Me ...


12

Different land managers have different takes on this so I don't think you're going to get a solid answer that applies across all areas. I generally use the term "trail camp" to describe what you're talking about. An area with up turned rocks for sitting and doing stuff on, a fire ring, some flat spots for sleeping, etc. I've never dismantled a single one, ...


11

There are a lot of ways to start fires, from a lighter to a chocolate bar and soda can. The basic principles always apply, though: you need oxygen, heat, and fuel (see fire triangle). If you can combine these three just right, you'll get fire. There is a sort of art to starting a fire. Generally you will need: Tinder: tiny twigs (dry pine branches are a ...


11

The pro of a fire steel over other lighters is that there's little that can break or be damaged from weather. Even if you lose the striker, a steel knife will work with the flint. However the con is that you only get a spark, not a steady flame. That means it needs to hit something that will ignite very easily. I use it to light my stoves (alcohol and ...


11

An alternative to building a fire inside your shelter is to heat some rocks in a fire outside, and bring them inside (don't burn yourself!). A fire can sometimes be the best thing, but the heat from a hot rock can be a safer option if you're nervous.



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