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16

Cooking raw brats over a fire is only dodgy because cooking brats well requires fairly precise (for a campfire) temperature control. Even with hot dogs, it can be a bit challenging to get the whole thing consistently cooked through without burning the outside. With a bratwurst, its larger size makes that especially difficult without some skill or tools. If ...


5

Pork should be cooked to a minmimum of 63C or 145F. This is regardless of what type of pork it is. Providing you heat all (including the center) the pork to this temperature or above you will be fine and will not get ill. Ideally you should also let the food rest once cooked. This allows time for the heat to destroy all bacteria in the meat (with the added ...


3

not particularly, there are however meats which are safer than others. For example: solid chunks of beef only needs to be seared.(still a good idea to cook through but less important) To avoid confusion: this does not mean you can eat rotting beef but if it's not rotten, beef doesn't contain parasites all the way through and normally it's only the ...


3

It might be more dangerous simply due to the fact that it is raw - but this danger is real only in the case you travel with the meat for 2-3 days without proper cooling. If you cook it the first evening of your hike then it should be fine - and again, whatsisname's answer applies. For longer trips, I would recommend to take smoked sausages, something ...


3

The best tasting dish I personally ate that was cooked over fire is mandi. Image Credit: Wikipedia. Mandi is usually made from rice (basmati), meat (lamb or chicken), and a mixture of spices. The meat used is usually a young and small sized lamb to enhance the taste further. The main thing which differentiates mandi is that the meat is cooked in ...


3

If you use wood chunk charcoal, skirt steak is awesome cooked right on the coals. Credit: Alton Brown, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5y2voEWJ6U


3

Picture via Google from http://www.south-africa-tours-and-travel.com/south-african-barbecue.html Ideally you actually bbq by smearing butter on them first then grilling. The outside caramelizes into golden to just short of black. Some black is fine too, it all tastes so much better than boiled or in foil. If you lack a grill then desperate measures ...


2

Something we always did as scouts was to put cut up potatoes, vegetables, and sausage into a tin foil bowl and stick it in the fire. I always remember them cooking very well and they were also very hearty. Also, very little setup/cleanup; which I am always for! Breakfast can also be done in a foil bowl, just put scrambled eggs, sausage, green onions, ...


2

Once I did bread buns stuffed with sweet cottage cheese, some cream and raisins, wrapped up in tin foil and placed in the embers for some 10 minutes. Similar: cut out the middle of an apple, fill it with diced nuts, raisins, sugar, cinnamon. Other one: dice any juicy vegetable (courgette, eggplant, onions, mushrooms, tomatoes, paprikas), apply some ...


1

Tinned beans, or any tinned food that is sealed. Nothing to do with food poisoning, it's because the tins can explode as the pressure builds up.


1

One of my favourites is breadfruit, which I acquired a taste for while living in Jamaica. They apparently grow all over Southeast Asia and the Pacific too. In Jamaica they grow wild practically everywhere (there is a peak season when they end up littering the ground in places), making them a staple bush food. I've seen them occasionally in the supermarket ...



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