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16

Fires must be attended at all times! There is no such thing as, "the best way to leave a fire unattended for a short time," your fire is either being attended, or your fire is thoroughly extinguished and your pit is left cold, no argument. There are no conditions where an open pit fire can be left alone and be 100% guaranteed not to spread. It's the people ...


11

Different land managers have different takes on this so I don't think you're going to get a solid answer that applies across all areas. I generally use the term "trail camp" to describe what you're talking about. An area with up turned rocks for sitting and doing stuff on, a fire ring, some flat spots for sleeping, etc. I've never dismantled a single one, ...


11

I would say any time you're in an undeveloped area, it is OK and perhaps the most ethical thing to do, to dismantle fire rings. They encourage over-use of a particular spot, collect trash, etc. When you're in a developed camping area, you should not dismantle them. Having the fire ring there ensures that the damage from fires is kept to one area, thus ...


7

It boils down to the point what one could really do in such a situation. When I trek in India, I do come across such situations that beg some action from me and other sensitive people around. I define scope of 'what can I do' as following: Don't be outnumbered!: If we are outnumbered, I will rather opt to report it to the authority, without threatening the ...


4

First of all, you want to bring a lightweight hatchet with which you can split the green firewood. Remember that the more surface area you expose the more flame you will get and the hotter the fire will get. Last week, my friends and I were having a hard time with your same problem, so we made a bellows (air pump to fire) with an air mattress pump (4 D ...


2

Most comments here suggest that campfires are a back country tradition when in fact they are mostly in densely populated camping areas in parks. They are rarely used for cooking. Most of the noxious smoke blows right into the next campsite and the owners of the campfire sit comfortably upwind of the fire. It appears that NPS has no policy on this except to ...


1

I've gotten pretty sufficient fires on a rainy fall day with relatively wet wood. Something that I often do is collect a lot of wet wood use the fire to dry out other logs. Make sure they're relatively small so they dry out by the time you need them. Just keep putting wood around the fire to dry as you use it. A good recommendation from @whatsisname is you ...


1

If the fire seems to die out, use a long stick or a fire poker to move the logs and woods around. You should also blow on them, to provide a burst of oxygen. Keep working on the fire until it seems to be stable again, if you neglect it, it will go out. A good sign is red, hot charcoal. These are so much hotter than the original wood was, and they will get ...



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