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8

I'm from British Columbia, lots of BC is technically a rain forest, which pretty much means you're always starting your fire with wet wood. The trick to getting wet wood to light is to generate a lot of heat when you first start your fire, that means using lots of extra kindling. Cut triple or quadruple the amount of fine kindling and build yourself a ...


8

I think this largely depends on the specific area you are traveling in. My approach is to always minimize campfires in the backcountry as a general rule. That being said, if I am in an abundant backcountry environment, where there is an already well made fire ring, I have no qualms making an occasional fire from dead, down, dry, and less than wrist size ...


7

Like most activities, campfires aren't simply ethical or unethical. There are only a few things in this world that are always ethical or always unethical. Rather, there are ethical and unethical ways to behave. I don't expect a campsite to look exactly like the land around it - I understand there will be artificial clearings in the trees, perhaps a sign ...


4

Avoiding the word 'ethical', I'll ask: Is it good for the forest to stop all fires, and let fuel accumulate? In North America this has led to many very destructive fires that kill every tree in the forest. Lot's of money and time is being spent to clear out the excess fuel with controlled burns before it is too late. So in these areas, I'd say go ahead, ...


3

Kerosene is different from other carbon fuels in that is has a much higher flash point, meaning that it has to be warmer than other fuels before it will produce a vapour that can be ignited. Other fuels with a much lower flash point produce a lot more vapours at warmer temperatures, making them much more volatile. If your lamp is designed to be used with ...


2

Lighter fluid and charcoal lighter fluid may be one of or a combination of the following: alcohol, kerosene, naphtha or other petroleum solvent. Therefore I would stick with kerosene.


1

Let me turn the question around: Is it ethical to use a portable stove to burn irreplaceable fossil fuels? Is it ethical to carry that fossil fuel in a pressurised can (for gas fuel stoves) or metal bottle (for liquid fuel stoves) that can't be easily recycled and so ends up in landfill? However, note Shem's comment below - Aluminium bottles are almost ...


1

A fire in combination with a reflector in front or even inside your shelter is a really good way to get a lot of warmth. As for the type of fire: It really depends on your type of shelter, but the so called top-down fire is the one I can really recommend. If done right, this will warm you while building it :) and once lit, will provide you with around 6-8 ...



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