Hot answers tagged

25

Wool does not melt or drip This answer might surprise you: wool! Wool (...) does not melt or drip(.) Wool ignites at a higher temperature than cotton and some synthetic fibers. It has a lower rate of flame spread, a lower rate of heat release, a lower heat of combustion, and does not melt or drip; it forms a char which is insulating and ...


18

Fires must be attended at all times! There is no such thing as, "the best way to leave a fire unattended for a short time," your fire is either being attended, or your fire is thoroughly extinguished and your pit is left cold, no argument. There are no conditions where an open pit fire can be left alone and be 100% guaranteed not to spread. It's the people ...


12

Different land managers have different takes on this so I don't think you're going to get a solid answer that applies across all areas. I generally use the term "trail camp" to describe what you're talking about. An area with up turned rocks for sitting and doing stuff on, a fire ring, some flat spots for sleeping, etc. I've never dismantled a single one, ...


11

I would say any time you're in an undeveloped area, it is OK and perhaps the most ethical thing to do, to dismantle fire rings. They encourage over-use of a particular spot, collect trash, etc. When you're in a developed camping area, you should not dismantle them. Having the fire ring there ensures that the damage from fires is kept to one area, thus ...


9

I've been out in the woods with companions who have suffered severe burns. You first priority is to relieve the pain, you accomplish this by removing the heat from the burn. Cool clean water is your best friend for the first few hours at least, have the victim stick his hand in a cool clean lake or stream. I say cool water, not cold water. If the water is ...


8

It boils down to the point what one could really do in such a situation. When I trek in India, I do come across such situations that beg some action from me and other sensitive people around. I define scope of 'what can I do' as following: Don't be outnumbered!: If we are outnumbered, I will rather opt to report it to the authority, without threatening the ...


8

The most important thing for a firesteel striker is that it is hard and has a 'crisp', although not necessarily sharp edge. Stainless steel knives tend not to work quite so well as plain carbon steel ones. In general when you use the back of a knife as a firesteel it needs to be ground with a well defined square edge to the spine. Carbon steel files work ...


7

I have ruined more than one hatchet in my lifetime trying to split large logs in half. The trick is to not try to spit them down the middle as you would with an axe, but to chop around the edges of the logs and split off smaller pieces all the way around, making the log smaller and smaller as you go. One technique is to make "helper" chops in the top around ...


7

Since you didn't limit the question to materials found in nature: I've lit wet firewood in the rain using pieces of waxed cardboard. They burn very fast and hot. And wax firestarters are essentially waterproof themselves, so they're pretty reliable even in wet conditions. You used to be able to get waxed cardboard from any supermarket, in the form of ...


7

A good burning barrel needs holes near the bottom to supply air. A pick axe or a geology hammer works well for putting in the holes. Put most of them between 6 and 12 inches from the base. Used for burning trash on a weekly basis a barrel lasts for years. If you store it where it is dry, it will last longer, as the alternation of heat and wet causes it ...


5

All are perfectly valid, which works best depends on the circumstances. In my experience a log cabin stack is good when you have short square sticks, for example what you would get from splitting sawn logs and a teepee tends to be easier to build when you have more irregular branches and twigs. The lean to is useful if there is a strong wind coming from ...


5

It honestly depends on conditions and what you are trying to accomplish. If you have nice whittled shavings to start with, the make a log cabin of those, and slowly increase the size of kindling and finally logs added to the fire. If you have branches that are roughly 1 inch, then a teepee is better. Don't forget the star configuration. That 5 logs laid ...


5

The short answer to your question is yes you can get a stove to light and cook your egg on the top of Everest if you really wanted to do it. Backpacking stoves are pressurized All of the backpacking stoves I've used use some sort of pressurized fuel system. This means that the ambient air pressure isn't going to affect the flow of the fuel. Fuel ...


4

Banking a fire outdoors can done, but...it really depends on the area. With the droughts out west, a Leave No Trace fire from a Nimbelwall collapsible stove or a portable gas or alcohol stove is best. To bank a fire really just means to bed down all the pieces of wood sticking up and possibly cover the fire with ashes. Blocking the prevailing wind with a ...


4

I strike my fire steel with a piece of hacksaw blade. I have the added ability to either just strike/scrape the ferro rod, shave shavings off it into a tinder bundle to get more intense fire lighting sparks, I can use the striker to shave fat wood, or normal wood, which will in turn take less of a spark to ignite, I can attach a piece of paracord through the ...


4

When I built a pit to roast pigs in some years ago, my brother brought up a bunch of lava rocks from southern Oregon for me to line it with. What you don't want are river rocks. Basically you're looking for rocks with rough edges instead of rounded. Rounded indicates the rock has been smoothed by water action and may contain water which as you've ...


4

First of all, you want to bring a lightweight hatchet with which you can split the green firewood. Remember that the more surface area you expose the more flame you will get and the hotter the fire will get. Last week, my friends and I were having a hard time with your same problem, so we made a bellows (air pump to fire) with an air mattress pump (4 D ...


4

TLDR: military grade tech fabrics designed for air and tank crew uniforms. As others have pointed out you might reconsider cotton as an outer layer only. Be careful with waxed cotton as some have suggested, occasionally the wax is flammable. Wool is a good choice given your criteria. If however money is no object and/or you don't mind surfing ebay till ...


4

For butane/isobutane/propane canisters, the stove design, affecting the temperature in the canister or liquid feed pipe, and the boiling point of the gas mixture would matter. At very low temperatures even the O ring rubber type would matter as some types go less rubbery and do not seal properly. For instance, if the temperature of an upright butane ...


4

As principle behind this think about your old light bulb. One emergency method of lighting a fire used to be to break the glass of the light bulb in your flashlight and burn the filament, no more no less than the way its done with a strand of steel wool for example. Now, when you put the filament between positive and negative there will be some resistance in ...


3

I normally baton with a large knife, but the principle remains the same (driving a wedge to split the wood). I taught myself how to baton in order to quickly make kindling from larger sections, often quarter-rounds, while my little cousin was around. Batoning can be performed on logs or thickers sticks, depending on your needs and the size of your wedge. I ...


3

A purely synthetic outer layer of Nomex is a good choice. People fighting wild-land fires generally wear Nomex It it works in the middle of a forest fire, you will probably be happy with it at the campfire.


3

As already was pointed out in the comments: leave synthetics. Some time ago (can't find the source any more, unfortunately) I read about a guy who planed on a very minimalistic outdoor trip basically for the rest of his life, i.e. basically wander the woods of Europe and staying wherever he likes to stay. In his plans this required mostly to build your camp ...


3

This summer I went out canoe camping in some light rain that turned into a torrential downpour and wouldn't stop. When it finally did, there was a puddle in the fireplace and we had no dry wood. We had a little paper with us, and we got tinder from the inside of logs, and all those tricks, but nothing worked and we had a small child with us who was getting ...


3

From a comment in this Yahoo Answers thread: However, you don't typically breath in campfire smoke in concentrations as high as cigarette smoke, and it doesn't have the addictive chemicals in it either. Campfire smoke is not an issue for most people because they are not exposed to it very often. However in parts of the world where people cook over a ...


3

I used the wax paper on the salt water taffies. I compacted one into a small ball, as small as I could get it, then wrapped others until I got about 10 on in total then lit it and it stayed burning for quite awhile.


2

Most comments here suggest that campfires are a back country tradition when in fact they are mostly in densely populated camping areas in parks. They are rarely used for cooking. Most of the noxious smoke blows right into the next campsite and the owners of the campfire sit comfortably upwind of the fire. It appears that NPS has no policy on this except to ...


2

A solution that meets all of your criteria (with the possible exception of being robust) is a DIY cat food alcohol stove used with a DIY Bushbuddy-style gasifier stove. Both are easily and cheaply made, and very lightweight. Hundreds of people use one or the other, or both, in all seasons. When in alcohol mode, put the stove inside the bushbuddy; the ...


2

First of all, modern technology has eliminated the necessity of using campfires to stay warm at night with light weight tents and effective sleeping systems. There was a time when fires were almost a necessity in order to sleep comfortably in the cold, but nowadays they are only required in survival situations, and are actually frowned upon by people who ...


2

A grill is only needed when you want to grill. Otherwise there are lots of ways to cook food over an open fire. You can use the classic spit over a fire: You can use rocks to elevate a container over the coals: You can boil water over an open flame in just about anything: You can even just throw meat in the coals: The list goes on and on. ...



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