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20

Basically tin foil is your friend! Even though you could also place some of these foods directly on the embers, if you're willing to carry some tin foil and do a little bit of preparation, you can create some awesome meals on a campfire. Potatoes Image by Ryan Dickey Slice them open unpeeled and fill them with cream cheese Season with salt, chives, ...


17

Cooking raw brats over a fire is only dodgy because cooking brats well requires fairly precise (for a campfire) temperature control. Even with hot dogs, it can be a bit challenging to get the whole thing consistently cooked through without burning the outside. With a bratwurst, its larger size makes that especially difficult without some skill or tools. If ...


17

Make a big fire. This may sound silly and couterintuitive, but the reason is pretty simple. If you make a small fire you need to put your stuff pretty close to it to have any chance of drying it in a decent amount of time. And if you put clothes or boots near the fire, then you concretely risk to burn them. While if you make a bigger fire, your equipment ...


14

If you think about it, lighting a kerosene lamp with a flint and steel is essentially the same as lighting a Zippo Lighter. The classic of classic lighters has a flammable-fluid soaked wick that is ignited by a small flint and steel. The only significant difference is that Kerosene has a slightly higher flashpoint than Lighter Fluid (Naphtha). Lighter ...


13

Another one would be Damper, an Australian bush bread traditionally cooked in the hot ashes of a dying fire, with or without tin-foil (just don’t eat the crust). It has a pretty delicious smokey taste and is fun to make with the kids. I won’t suggest a particular recipe because there are so many variations. The core is just flour, baking soda, salt, and ...


11

Its not necessarily bad as long as you are careful, also somewhat dependent on material. Generally, you want to arrange your clothes so that they are about a temperature where you could comfortably hold your hand. If your clothes are steaming keep a close eye on them and think about moving them back. Material is also an important factor synthetic ...


9

A magnifying glass will not light it, and I don't think a flint and steel will directly - you need a flame rather than a spark - but that is easily solved through using a piece of newspaper with kindling, or taper. Just use your magnifying glass or flint to light the paper, then use that to light the lamp. Slightly messy, and you need to be careful where ...


8

I think this largely depends on the specific area you are traveling in. My approach is to always minimize campfires in the backcountry as a general rule. That being said, if I am in an abundant backcountry environment, where there is an already well made fire ring, I have no qualms making an occasional fire from dead, down, dry, and less than wrist size ...


8

I'm from British Columbia, lots of BC is technically a rain forest, which pretty much means you're always starting your fire with wet wood. The trick to getting wet wood to light is to generate a lot of heat when you first start your fire, that means using lots of extra kindling. Cut triple or quadruple the amount of fine kindling and build yourself a ...


7

Poisonous plants are typically more dangerous when you burn them, at least that's true with plants that have oily toxins (poison ivy/oak). Toxins in plants aren't necessarily vaporized when burned. Smoke is a particulate, not a vapour. If you are burning something toxic, the toxins can potentially be carried by particles of smoke and be inhaled which is far ...


7

Like most activities, campfires aren't simply ethical or unethical. There are only a few things in this world that are always ethical or always unethical. Rather, there are ethical and unethical ways to behave. I don't expect a campsite to look exactly like the land around it - I understand there will be artificial clearings in the trees, perhaps a sign ...


6

Pork should be cooked to a minmimum of 63C or 145F. This is regardless of what type of pork it is. Providing you heat all (including the center) the pork to this temperature or above you will be fine and will not get ill. Ideally you should also let the food rest once cooked. This allows time for the heat to destroy all bacteria in the meat (with the added ...


6

There isn't a problem carrying fuel for camping stoves (assuming in "sensible" quanities) in the UK. HOWEVER, when wild camping (i.e camping off of organised camp sites) in the UK, the ethos is to leave no trace afterwards. So setting camp fires is a no-no. And on many organised camp sites, open fires are forbidden (although some do allow small fires and ...


6

At least for some species, Rhododendron wood is not especially toxic when burned. I've seen (and used) many species of Rhododendron in the Chinese Himalaya as firewood, in both outdoor and drafty indoor conditions. This included seasoned and unseasoned wood, and large enough quantities of smoke that my Rite-in-The-Rain notebooks still smell like bacon. ...


5

A quick search yielded this video, which seems straightforward enough. I have never seen anyone use charcloth like in the video, but it seems to work nicely. To summarize the video: Place the charcloth on top of the flintstone with your fingers. Strike the flint until the charcloth is lit. Put the glowing charcloth into a tinder bundle (old rope that has ...


5

I wasn't able to light an Aladdin kerosene lamp with the sparks of a zippo. (Kerosene needs much more energy to ignite than lighter fluid) As an ironic side question - do you really need a lamp when there is enough sunlight to ignite it with a magnifying glass? ;-)


5

Lightweight stoves are preferred over campfires, but it is still important to know how to make a leave no trace campfire when the occasion calls for it (run out of fuel too soon, stove failure, etc.). I think a mound fire would be best in this situation. Lay a sheet on the ground and pile a mound of dirt on top of it (get your dirt from a previously ...


4

Your bow can be made of any pliable wood like yew, which archers have used for centuries. Your drill shaft should be a hard wood like oak or cherry. Your kindling wood (the wood being drilled into for fire) should be a soft-fibered wood like pine. If you find pine too resinous, seek out older pines that may have stopped producing resin. You can identify ...


4

The best tasting dish I personally ate that was cooked over fire is mandi. Image Credit: Wikipedia. Mandi is usually made from rice (basmati), meat (lamb or chicken), and a mixture of spices. The meat used is usually a young and small sized lamb to enhance the taste further. The main thing which differentiates mandi is that the meat is cooked in ...


4

It's a good idea to carry along some snacks, Fritos, potato chips, doritoes. You can light these with a magnifying glass, if the sun is out. I've had to resort to this to get the wood stove lit when my lighter was out of fluid while snowed in. There is a high fat/grease content in those snacks. They burn like a candle. Try it!


4

not particularly, there are however meats which are safer than others. For example: solid chunks of beef only needs to be seared.(still a good idea to cook through but less important) To avoid confusion: this does not mean you can eat rotting beef but if it's not rotten, beef doesn't contain parasites all the way through and normally it's only the ...


4

fire steel can be used but you would be wise to find a tinder i.e. birch bark, Vaseline soaked cotton in a pill bottle.. I would not recommend a kerosine lamp where a candle in a safe enclosure would work just as nice. also practice a bit before your trip as it does take some skill.


4

Avoiding the word 'ethical', I'll ask: Is it good for the forest to stop all fires, and let fuel accumulate? In North America this has led to many very destructive fires that kill every tree in the forest. Lot's of money and time is being spent to clear out the excess fuel with controlled burns before it is too late. So in these areas, I'd say go ahead, ...


3

Simple demonstration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVpGFAJmG3g. The trick is to pull the Flint-stick towards you while keeping the scraper stationary. Make sure you are using something dry, tiny, or chard cloth, or fine steel wool works well. I've never had a problem with mine, but I still like to rough it a little more and use the Bow and Drill method.


3

It might be more dangerous simply due to the fact that it is raw - but this danger is real only in the case you travel with the meat for 2-3 days without proper cooling. If you cook it the first evening of your hike then it should be fine - and again, whatsisname's answer applies. For longer trips, I would recommend to take smoked sausages, something ...


3

If you use wood chunk charcoal, skirt steak is awesome cooked right on the coals. Credit: Alton Brown, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5y2voEWJ6U


3

Picture via Google from http://www.south-africa-tours-and-travel.com/south-african-barbecue.html Ideally you actually bbq by smearing butter on them first then grilling. The outside caramelizes into golden to just short of black. Some black is fine too, it all tastes so much better than boiled or in foil. If you lack a grill then desperate measures ...


3

Kerosene is different from other carbon fuels in that is has a much higher flash point, meaning that it has to be warmer than other fuels before it will produce a vapour that can be ignited. Other fuels with a much lower flash point produce a lot more vapours at warmer temperatures, making them much more volatile. If your lamp is designed to be used with ...


2

Most of the time, if it's a public beach & you know how to build a bonfire & keep it under control, you should be fine. For example, a music festival in Whitby has had an unofficial beach bonfire twice a year & has had 1 visit from the Police in 20 years. They took a quick look at the fire, saw that it was being looked after by people who knew ...



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