Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

If you absolutely must have a fire, reset your thinking from "fire pit" to "fire mound" Creating a fire mound is a great way to enjoy a back-country fire with little to no impact to the ground / vegetation. Carry a small sheet of plastic, burlap, or a section of an old fire shelter, or anything of the like (it shouldn't get hot enough to burn if your ...


6

Heartwood, assuming the definition on Wikipedia as basically just the middle of the tree that is no longer growing, is indeed what you will be burning most of the time as fuel for your fire. Considering it has not been growing for some time, it may well be somewhat drier than the surrounding sapwood, and therefore actually burn better. That said, the ...


4

You touched on one thing: fires are often seasonal. Want to avoid fires in the Canadian Rockies? Come in the winter time. Want to risk smoke inhilation in the BC interior, come visit in August. Find out what the situation is in the area you are visiting, for the extent of your visit. Most parks have fire safety levels that clearly indicate weather the fire ...


3

This isn't a direct answer to the question, but I want to point out that most ordinary forest fires pose little danger to humans. It is the relatively unusual crown fires which can be very dangerous. In generally dry pine forests, like many parts of the western US, forest fire is a natural and relatively frequent (from the point of view of long-lived ...


3

Well, insulating the floor from a campfire, which usually has 900-1200 degrees Celsius and burns for several hours, is quite difficult. The soil itself does a decent job, but of course that's the part that you don't want to burn... Restoring life to a scorched patch of soil will take a while, but relatively speaking a couple of scorched patches won't make ...


2

Ok, first thing to note is who owns the coast. The land between the high water mark and the low water mark is owned by the crown (crown reserves) in UK law. (ref) The land above he high water mark is owned by land owners, this may also be the crown if it's common land etc. Any land owned by private land owners is subject to the land owners themselves. They ...


2

I have successfully made friction fires before, and it is possible. That said, it is not easy. I would reccomend leaning the bow drill. Use basswood, western red/eastern white cedars, poplar or cottonwood, among others. It is easier than other methods, but still requires a lot of practice. When I was learning the hand drill, I practiced EVERY DAY before I ...


1

There's two schools of thought here that I know of - the first is to avoid lighting a fire where there's ground you could easily damage, and the second is avoiding the heat getting to the ground. Combine both if you can. As far as the first goes, I won't say a great deal about that because beyond the obvious (being open minded about where you camp and ...


1

If you are looking for a cooking system for backpacking the Caldera Sidewinder Ti-Tri have the option of using a titanium floor for this exact purpose. In the interest of facilitating Leave No Trace wood burning practices, Trail Designs offers two styles of titanium floor plates to go under your Ti-Tri systems. The "split floor" is designed to go with ...


1

I use the wood pieces method. For charcoal pieces medium twig-sized sticks (say 1 cm diameter) are OK. For pressed charcoal, I go for sticks of 3 - 4 cm diameter. For real coal (on the grill 8-o who wants to eat stuff roasted on a real coal fire?) I'd go for a nice wood fire with sticks (chopped wood) of at least 5 - 7 cm diameter. Should be close to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible