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It honestly depends on conditions and what you are trying to accomplish. If you have nice whittled shavings to start with, the make a log cabin of those, and slowly increase the size of kindling and finally logs added to the fire. If you have branches that are roughly 1 inch, then a teepee is better. Don't forget the star configuration. That 5 logs laid ...


5

To answer the third question: Charcoal is basically wood (technically any biomass, but it's usually wood) that has had its water and other volatile components completely removed, leaving pretty much a lump of almost entirely carbon. Charcoal compared to wood is similar to comparing distilled, concentrated alcohol to sugar cane. The charcoal burns ...


4

Pressure treated wood is especially toxic, since it contains chemicals meant to preserve it and kill things that would destroy it. Never burn pressure-treated wood. Other answers covered the rest pretty well.


4

A camping grill is not the indispensable cooking utensil in the wild, at least not anymore. Back in the day cooking over a fire was your only option for eating hot food, and a grill was the lightest thing you could carry for cooking. Cooking over a campfire is still fun, it's nostalgic for a lot of people, but it's not necessary in the backcountry these ...


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You shouldn't inhale too much smoke. Everything which is (or used to be) alive is mostly carbon, and whenever carbon burns, you get carbon-monoxide which is poisonous. Symptoms of acute carbon-monoxide poisoning are: Dull headache Weakness Dizziness Nausea Shortness of breath Confusion Blurred vision When you have these symptoms while spending some time ...


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No, it is not safe to burn just any kind of wood, because some woods contain toxins that have the potential to be fatal if inhaled as ash (poison oak, poison ivy). However, most wood found in nature is safe. There's no such thing as smoke that won't cause damage to the lungs, smoke is a particle, your body has many levels of defense to try and prevent ...


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In the context of camping, it's perfectly safe to wear a down jacket. Keep in mind that fleece is typically also made from synthetics, and so can be expected to have similar properties to your down jacket. (Actually somewhat worse, given the texture.) A table of synthetic fiber characteristics at ...


5

It may be safe for you, but not for your jacket. While it won't instantly burst into flames, your very expensive jacket will get holes melted in it by hanging around a fire, same goes for any other nylons or non fire-resistant synthetic materials. Goose down will burn fairly well, oddly enough there are quite a few youtube videos of people burning down ...


12

Having built several fires while wearing down jackets I can confirm that your jacket will not burst into flames, nylon is not that flammable. The worst you will experience is a small burn hole in the outside if an ember lands on you. Probably still a good idea to keep a safe distance away anyway there are plenty of other ways to burn yourself on a fire. Me ...



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