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4

I use a bigger tin box (it is left from an old Str8 perfume), and within that I put the things in ziplock bags.


3

Stack the wood in a row, lying east to west (for equatorial exposure to the sun) Split wood tends to burn better than whole round pieces of branches - as splitting exposes the inner layers of the tree to air movement that aids in drying. Avoid ground contact as much as possible, as the frost may make it difficult to remove - as well the wood will absorb ...


23

First realize that firewood has two qualities when it relates to moisture. Green/Seasoned Wet/Dry When a tree is cut down the wood is green. Over time the wood seasons, natural moisture in it evaporates. Depending on the type of wood, it takes 6 to 12 months to become seasoned. Green wood will burn, but it spends most of its energy boiling off the ...


18

You don't really have to keep it dry at all. If it is proper firewood, it has already dried. A little rain won't change that. To start a fire you can split the wood, which will be dry inside. Once the fire has gained a little strength, you can just put the wet logs on; they will dry in no time. I can understand if you want to keep the wood from soaking ...


13

Don't chop it. If you haul in your wood unchopped with its bark still on, then it'll stay dry enough on the inside. We found a pile of wood buried in the snow at one winter camp, and had no troubles getting a fire going with it. Don't worry too much about it getting wet; just leave it stacked in a spot where water won't accumulate. It will burn without any ...


2

Depending on the type of wood, 50 kg of wood will take up about 0.1 m^3 when stacked. Depending on local rules, I would simply bury it in a cheap plastic tarp. Just make sure you remember the location and bring a shovel. This would be best if you can bring it all in one trip, but if not, just dig the hole deep enough for all the wood on the first load.


6

The most critical consideration is that it is absolutely bone dry which can be a challenge in temperate climates. Usually the best bet is to look for dead wood which is standing or at least off the ground. Ideally you are looking for something which is obviously long dead but still sound i.e. not rotten. Similarly it is often best to split a moderately ...



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