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13

Seawater is not itself sterile, in fact, it has all kinds of organisms. Salt in a wound is likely to hurt, and saltwater won't be a particularly effective antiseptic. With wound cleaning, it's always a question of trade-offs. It might be better to use less-than-sterile water to clean an extremely dirty wound if infection is otherwise inevitable. However, ...


12

Decide depending upon the impact that person has on the group and the event. If he/she is a crucial member to keep going, may be the group should agree to call it off, and decide to turn back or set up a camp, depending upon the supplies and the location. You'd never want to make someone walk back home is he/she is really in not a shape to sustain the ...


12

The concern is valid; your basic plan should be to stay calm and not increase your heart rate. If other options for evacuation are not available, slowly walking yourself out is the best remaining option. The bitten area can swell quite a bit, so remove nearby jewelry or clothing to prevent them from turning into tourniquets. If you have a pen you can use ...


8

Polarized sunglasses, as with other type of sunglasses may not block enough UV to be considered safe. From WikiPedia: for adequate protection, experts recommend sunglasses that reflect or filter out 99-100% of UVA and UVB light, with wavelengths up to 400 nm. Sunglasses which meet this requirement are often labeled as "UV400. In other words, ...


7

First, to directly answer your question: no, don't run. Running increases your heart rate, which increases how fast the venom will be spread through your body. It also increases the likelihood of another injury such as a twisted ankle, which would further delay treatment. Your first priority is to distance yourself from the snake and any of its friends. ...


7

No, seawater cannot be considered antiseptic. At minimum, Staphylococcus, which is the cause of many serious infections and deaths every year, and one agent of necrotizing fasciitis, is "able to survive: ... High levels of salt" and may even be spread by seawater. I recall reading (but am presently unable to cite) that parasites such as Cryptosporidium ...


6

First do a proper assessment and determine that it's actually a dislocation and not another problem or that there isn't also another injury in addition to the dislocation. This requires the proper training which is beyond the scope of this medium. This is not a substitute for proper training. So you've done the assessment and there are no life-threatening ...


6

Polarization and UV protection on sunglasses are two different things. While UV refers to light of a wavelength of approximately 10nm to 400nm, light of any wavelength can be polarized. So polarized sunglasses do not generally protect against UV, they also need a dedicated UV filter. Light emitted by the sun oscillates in all directions perpendicular to the ...


6

Your first objective will be to address any immediate threats to life, gain patient consent, and conduct a thorough patient assessment. Each injury or sickness will have its own criteria for action, but they can generally be classified into three responses: Stay and play, take a rest day, or evacuate. If you are taking the role of first aider for the ...


4

Great question. Just to add to the already excellent answers; there is an SAS abbreviation which has always served me very well, and it applies here. PLAN your course of action; Protection: The safety of the group, and the individuals within the group, is of greatest importance. Ensuring you protect the group and it's members is the first priority. It ...


3

I have heard that if you do not remove the leech until it gets full and naturally drops off that you will not bleed much, and that it is safer because you reduce the risk of infection. At the moment I can't find good sources for this, only: http://www.goborneotravel.com/removing-leeches-properly/ In case the leech has already got you, do not pull it ...


2

I haven't tried @Vorac answer, but it sounds interesting. I'm not going to say if popping a blister is correct or not. But, if you do, this is how I was taught to pop a blister: Get a needle (sterile of course) About 1/3 of an inch from the blister, insert the needle under the skin towards the blister. When it reaches the blister, remove the needle. There ...


2

Use salt as it helps remove leeches. ( I know it works I have personally seen it work and it honestly does dry them up.) You could also just leave them to fill up and fall off and then they are gone. The biggest worry though is probably infection for incorrect methods of removal. To prevent leeches I recommend leech socks or pants as they really work but are ...


1

Seawater, no. But clean salt water, yes. Salt-water solution should be isotonic, i.e. same salt level as your body; ca ΒΌ teaspoon of sea-salt to 250 ml water. I used it on my nose piercing and it was very effective. :)


1

Small addendum to the excellent answers already present: Never release a tourniquet unless you have received expert instruction on doing so. If the patient who received a tourniquet does not receive medical attention within a few hours, it is likely that the patient will loose the affected limb. Therefore, before applying a tourniquet, make sure that a ...


1

Put some sort of thick covering that prevents oxygen from reaching the bite. Popular options include Vaseline.


1

Septic pencil, bandage. Treatment: Leeches must be removed from the skin carefully. If a leech is ripped from the skin, its fangs may break off and remain embedded, which induces ulcer formation. Leech removal is facilitated by application of a few drops of alcohol, vinegar, or brine. An alternative removal method involves the application of a lit match to ...



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