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7

As for the reason why it is risky: You cannot know if the guy you want to help has any disease that can be transferred via blood contact, such as HIV or Hepatitis. Already small wounds in your own skin –you might not recognize it as a wound at all– might be enough to transfer the disease, therefore it would be quite risky to just stick your hand into any ...


6

You don't want to immobilize a dislocated shoulder. You really need to fix it. Even if held at just the right angle and not being jostled around, a dislocated shoulder hurts. After a while the muscles will tighten, then start spasming periodically. Then it really hurts and it becomes much more difficult to get it back in. There are some dangers in ...


3

For wounds with heavy bleeding or that are deep, the standard practice is to: Apply direct pressure to the wound. Elevate the injury to decrease blood flow. In short, if the flow of blood is high enough that it won't clot then you want to impede the output by whatever means possible. As mentioned elsewhere, tourniquets are a last resort, where the lose ...


3

"tight bandage/band" = Tourniquet. An emergency tourniquet is generally used as a last resort, especially in civilian applications, for all blood flow below the application of an emergency tourniquet is stopped, and can subsequently kill the tissue, leading to eventual loss of the limb below application. Never attempt to apply a tourniquet unless you are ...


3

My wife is a doctor and she always wears gloves when dealing with wounds, even with friends outside of clinic. But when I ask her if I should wear gloves, she says it's not necessary. The reason is that the probability to catch a disease in, well, developed contries is quite small, so if you do it once in a year you are ok. But if you do it every day you ...


3

The best thing for a scorpion sting: wash the area apply an ice-pack or cold compress consider aspirin or ibuprofen for pain and swelling wait it out There is nothing else you can do. They can hurt. A lot. But generally aren't an issue. The exception to this rule, is the Arizona bark scorpion which is found in the Sonoran desert through AZ and southern ...


2

I don't know what's recommended. I carry a Sawyer Extractor for snakebites. I've used it on a spider bite and various insect bites. It works by using a vacuum to extract the venom or whatever has entered the puncture. If I got stung by anything, including a scorpion, it's what I'd start with.


1

I haven't tried @Vorac answer, but it sounds interesting. I'm not going to say if popping a blister is correct or not. But, if you do, this is how I was taught to pop a blister: Get a needle (sterile of course) About 1/3 of an inch from the blister, insert the needle under the skin towards the blister. When it reaches the blister, remove the needle. There ...


1

In case you don't have anything to put on your bites, i found out the following. If you got snow around you, put a piece of metal (i prefer a spoon) in the snow or cold water, and wait for it to nearly freeze. And then just put the freezing cold spoon on the bite You can also heat a spoon (or just use a lighter directly) and as soon as you won't burn ...



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