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3

If the water is sufficiently clean that you are willing to eat the fish, it's clean enough to use to bleed the fish. Dirt as such isn't poisonous. Clear water isn't necessarily safe. Two ways come to mind: Use a pail of river water. This will at least keep most of the local critters nibbling on it. Wrap in wet burlap, and set up a can to drip on ...


3

I'm going to be that guy and answer my own question, since it's languished for a while... Since there were no answers, I just went ahead and tried it. Verdict is that it works and seems to be very strong, but it is not easy to quickly switch leaders, since the braid-half of the loop-to-loop tightens around it itself much more than the mono/fluoro side of ...


3

I fish daily in a kayak and have caught and eaten thousands of fish from snapper to mackerel to wahoo. I throw them in the hull of the kayak with no ice and continue to fish, sometimes for several hours. Been doing this for years and have never had an issue.


3

There is no reason to kill, bleed and gut the fish immediately. The ideal way to preserve freshness is to keep the fish alive as long as possible. Depending on your situation this is best accomplished via a livewell (found in most recreational fishing boats), if fishing from shore, a traditional fish stringer or a wire basket are your best bets. Once you are ...


2

After you kill and gut the fish, then clean it (wash it and scale it, if it needs scaling.) I don't know what you mean by "bleeding" a fish: I only ever gut it. After doing this, you do not actually need to put it in the cooler. You can leave it out for a couple hours, it will not spoil. This has been my experience - I've done this, and then cooked the fish ...


2

Yes, it is possible. In my experience, the best attractant is food. You want to put the attractant out well in advance, and preferably over a number of days. Anything blood based will work for most bottom feeders (catfish and the like). Rice also works fairly well for catfish, over a period of time. For active predators such as bass, you have a harder ...


2

Perhaps this is too obvious an answer but there's a little thumb-screw bolt that goes through the reel from the other side and screws into the handle to keep it in place. It sounds like this was loose when you started fishing and completely detached from the handle while you were fishing. It's normal that you'd have to tighten this from time to time but may ...


2

The list of fish in that area is relatively easy to find, but the trick is identifying useful areas - the fishing trip websites don't give too much away. One useful place a friend told me about is between about 5 and 10 miles south of Friendship, northwest of Allen Island. This time of year you cam expect cod, pollock and halibut. Going further south you ...


2

You never mentioned what kind of baits you are using (from your description of what you are catching, I would assume worms or crickets) Small mouth Bass primarily eat live creatures. Most places where I fish for them, we use crawdad imitating baits. We fish rivers that are primarily rocky and they feed heavily on crawdads. Smallmouth will also hit things ...


2

well, I'm not a good bass fisherman, so I can't say much, except that the only times I've caught smallmouth was in rocky ledges of the lakes using nightcrawlers on the bottom. Maybe add some boulders/large rocks in certain parts of the lake and perhaps the bass will congregate in those areas.


2

Much depends on what you are fishing for and how you are fishing for it. I was an avid freshwater angler for almost forty years before my wife and I moved to Florida, and I have the garage full of tackle to prove it. What I found when I got here is that my lightest freshwater combos were too light for most saltwater fishing. Probably the most practical ...


2

I have found the side cast, and here, to be very useful in the situations you describe. I spent a number of years fishing small streams in the Blue Ridge of VA, and this type of cast gave me better reach than roll casting. I also favored a 6'6" rod in 1 or 2 wt. The short length of the rod kept me out of a lot of overhanging vegetation, but it also limited ...


2

(Local regulations have a part to play in gear selection - e.g. are you allowed to bait fish?) My personal preference in this situation is a telescopic rod. They have a bad reputation, mainly because you get lot's that are really cheap and nasty. Get a decent quality one and its nearly as good on the water as a similar priced 4 piece. I go telescopic as ...


1

I would follow the same rules as drinking water. The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses from one to the other. There are no sources of contamination upstream. As you mention, thinkable sources ...


1

Depending on the weather, I would try to keep them alive in the water until you are lamost ready to start back. Clean them just before you start back. If the weather is colder than that water, clean them immediately, and hang. You can wrap them in a burlap bag. If you keep the bag wet, evaporation will further chill them. Refrigerators are kept below 40 ...


1

I'm not sure if you're talking fresh or salt. In salt water I used various plugs (primarily cedar) in some really beefy conditions. 1000+ miles offshore, tradewind belt, 4 meter seas, etc. In those conditions (trolling), the plug is mimicking a bait fish that's at the surface, occasionally popping and bubbling. I have a cedar plug with a lot of teeth marks ...


1

My personal opinion would be to go with an ultralight rod, in the four to six foot range, with five and a half feet being ideal. An ultralight open face reel to match, loaded with four pound test monofilament compleats the set up.


1

I've got plenty of good sized crawfish in a minnow trap. I usually save my soda bottles and build crawfish traps out of them and I've got some large ones in that. I think the 1-inch size will be fine. http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Crawfish-Trap


1

Even if it has a racist note to it I found this: http://www.thehulltruth.com/sportfishing-charters-forum/200540-any-reels-rods-not-made-china.html#b


1

I don't know if this is local to New Zealand, but this is fairly common practice for both shore-based and boat anglers. You can either buy or make a Berley Bomb, which is exactly this. It is ground up fish / blood / bits frozen into a block, then hung in the water to defrost and disperse. If you are surfcasting, you can put one out a few hours before ...


1

I've been very successful catching northern pike in Alberta with the following setup. I should clarify that I was catching pike up to 18" long, and my setup reflects that. b) 2", 1/2 oz Spoons. The 5 of Diamonds (red on yellow) and red stripe on white also works well. http://www.lenthompson.com/fishing-lure-patterns.html c) Spinning reel, one with an ...


1

I'll try to answer some of the questions you have: b) The kind of lure I normally use for snatching pike is a wobbler, when it comes to bait, small fish(eg. common roach) usually piques the pikes interest.(no pun intended.) f) The pike likes to muddle around the reeds and similar environments, so you either need to go get it or make it come to you.


1

I can relate to the desire to fish close to home. I rarely travel more than 30 minutes to fish. However I think you would be missing out on a lifetime experience if you didn't spend some time fishing the small brook-trout streams out in Rappahannock, Madison and Greene Counties. I'm talking about the Rapidan, Rose, and Conway rivers for starters. The ...


1

Spearing is both viable and varies in legality within the U.S. Spearing during salmon runs has been done for centuries in the pacific northwest. "Darkhouse" spear fishing is popular on frozen lakes in the upper midwest and during the summer natives still spear for pike and walleye on many upper midwest lakes. ...



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