Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Rotten fish. That's all I need to say. Crabs go mad for rotten fish in a net bag. If you can't get your hands on rotten fish, raw chicken is probably the next best thing and is certainly easier to buy. Place it in a bag or secure it to a line and have a net ready. With the both of these remember to thoroughly wash your hands before eating anything after ...


6

Spade Hook That is very simply called an eyeless hook or a spade hook. Spade hooks are old school, but there are enough people that still say they're preferable to eyed hooks, in fly fishing at least, you tie both eyed and spade hooks basically the same. Some people pass the line almost arbitrarily through the eye on an eyed hook, but it's easier to tie ...


6

First things first you need to contact the correct authorities. You require written permission to trap crayfish in the UK. There was an episode of River Cottage where they trapped them on the River Kennet. The Gov website doesn't list where you can or cannot trap signals, as you need landowners and angling club permission to trap on our lakes and rivers. ...


5

I fish for everything from 9" brook trout to 15 lb. bluefish to 40 lb. striped bass on both fly rod and spinning tackle, and honestly I don't think I would say that one is better than the other except for the fact that with 1 piece rods you don't worry about losing your tip, OR that with multi-piece rods you can cart them around more easily (and reduce the ...


5

I asked my wife about this - she's from the Chesapeake Bay area, and is the daughter of a Navy man who loves fishing, so she knows a few things about what bait to use for crabs. Her recommendation is raw Turkey Neck - it's soft and has the right smell to attract crabs, and isn't quite as pungent to our own nose as rotten fish. Raw chicken will do too, or ...


4

Depending on your situation, you don't have to necessarily gut the fish, but in that case should cook it much longer than you otherwise would. Parasites are a concern, and the innards will make it harder for heat to propagate through the meat. Longer cooking times to ensure the insides are properly cooked mean a greater chance of overcooking the outer meat ...


4

One thing I saw a lot of last time I went crabbing and apparently rage threw my net off the pier (I hold to the fact it slipped out my hand!) was people using left over cooked sausages cut into small chunks, or raw bacon again in small bits. They seemed to be fairly successful. What a waste of bacon...


4

Anything smelly! Though crabs can't smell (as we think about it) they are scavengers by nature and detect their food by "smelling" microscopic particles in the water. So something really stinky and rotten will generate more "smell" thus attracting more crabs! Keeping them on the line is more tricky...


4

Meat, of any type except dead crabs, on a string or in a net bag. but be quick, a tug on the string and they book! Crab pots typically have a way of holding the bait so it can't be raided from the outside. either a shield or on the bottom.


4

If you are looking at two piece rods because of their more compact size, you may also want to consider telescoping rods. I've had (3) telescoping rods & all but the Amazon-special-carbon-fiber job have served me well (the no-name brand amazon one broke into many pieces...), but I've loved the Mako Calypso 8' rod & my much smaller Shakespeare ...


4

You can still buy those coolers at area grocery stores. If you're headed out of San Diego (where I'm at), I could give you the names of specific locations. There are also processors that will be waiting for you at the dock (in every major sport fishing location I've seen) that will chop and paper your catch. I think you could go from there, to a grocery ...


3

I have a lot of 2 pieces, one 4 piece, and 1 one piece. The one piece is my go to rod because I fish at night often (I live 3 blocks away from the Sacramento River). I'll have a tendency of not paying much attention of how my guides are aligned and end up casting to the extreme left or right initially. I never have to worry about that with my one piece rod ...


3

Chicken legs!! They were always the best bait we tried. Easiest to secure to the trap, and the crabs find them irresistible.


3

In certain BC rivers, fishing is catch and release only, it's illegal to fish with anything but a single barbless hook. I have a whole tackle box full of spoons that have been hacked to death by a pair of side cutters in order to make them legal for catch and release. When you hook a fish, reel them in normal, but pick them out of the water with a net, ...


3

I assume you are considering a new reel with multiple spools. The reel's performance will not be affected except that with a lighter line you will be able to fit more backing. In a 5wt setup that usually wouldn't offer any benefit. One potential issue with using a much larger reel is the balance. You may be able to cast well with a poorly balanced setup, ...


3

In the Lowcountry of South Carolina, we used turkey necks as bait. We'd tie the end of some narrow cord around a turkey neck, attach a few small fishing weights and toss if over the side of the boat or dock. Every few minutes, slowly pull up the line with a net at the ready. Toss the crabs into a cooler full of ice. That's how we did it.


3

I have seen someone use a raw chicken leg. Very meaty and once the crab latches on it doesn't let go.


3

Prawn heads. When I was a kid my parents used to buy a bag of prawns when we were at the seaside. I got the heads to use as bait. The crabs almost went into a frenzy to get at the head and didn't let go even when they got above water. A delicacy for the grownups and the crabs.


3

(Local regulations have a part to play in gear selection - e.g. are you allowed to bait fish?) My personal preference in this situation is a telescopic rod. They have a bad reputation, mainly because you get lot's that are really cheap and nasty. Get a decent quality one and its nearly as good on the water as a similar priced 4 piece. I go telescopic as ...


3

I'm not sure if you're talking fresh or salt. In salt water I used various plugs (primarily cedar) in some really beefy conditions. 1000+ miles offshore, tradewind belt, 4 meter seas, etc. In those conditions (trolling), the plug is mimicking a bait fish that's at the surface, occasionally popping and bubbling. I have a cedar plug with a lot of teeth marks ...


3

I have found the side cast, and here, to be very useful in the situations you describe. I spent a number of years fishing small streams in the Blue Ridge of VA, and this type of cast gave me better reach than roll casting. I also favored a 6'6" rod in 1 or 2 wt. The short length of the rod kept me out of a lot of overhanging vegetation, but it also limited ...


3

If the water is sufficiently clean that you are willing to eat the fish, it's clean enough to use to bleed the fish. Dirt as such isn't poisonous. Clear water isn't necessarily safe. Two ways come to mind: Use a pail of river water. This will at least keep most of the local critters nibbling on it. Wrap in wet burlap, and set up a can to drip on ...


2

I can relate to the desire to fish close to home. I rarely travel more than 30 minutes to fish. However I think you would be missing out on a lifetime experience if you didn't spend some time fishing the small brook-trout streams out in Rappahannock, Madison and Greene Counties. I'm talking about the Rapidan, Rose, and Conway rivers for starters. The ...


2

Your choice of an ugly stick is fantastic. I fish more specialized rods now, but I have owned many ugly sticks over the years, and they are rock solid performers. For the "small-water" fishing destinations and the species you say you'll be targeting, I would go for something in the 5-7' range - in a light rod power (to use Shakespeare parlance). Moderate to ...


2

I would hesitate to do so. The keen wading sandals I've worn let in a fair amount of gravel. This gravel, when caught between the sandal and the neoprene bootie, will make mincemeat of the bootie - causing it to leak. Gravel is a concern even when using full-on wading boots. To combat this many waders have gaiters built in. Mine do not, but I purchased ...


2

This type of dry fly floatant powder is quite effective at drying off smaller flies. I believe it's the same silica gel that is used to keep packaged electronics dry. But I typically just press flies between folds of a cotton t-shirt briefly. This will draw most of the water out and restore "floatability" to the fly. It should also leave it dry enough to ...


2

I assume you are asking about striped bass. Although I have never fished for stripers (or rockfish, depending on where you are) on the Pacific side of the USA, this is the species that surf anglers in the Northeast target most passionately. Many of the best places to find them are those with strong currents and places to hide in ambush. These conditions ...


1

Rod, reel (with line), hooks, sinkers, and probably bobbers. Landing net is optional.


1

I take a raw chicken and leave it in a lidded bucket in the garage for 2 to 3 days, along with a a good dose of fish sauce. Sometimes it gets so putrid, I can't use it without retching and gagging. I stuff the wretched concoction in a cage that's strapped to a 2 ring net.


1

I would follow the same rules as drinking water. The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses from one to the other. There are no sources of contamination upstream. As you mention, thinkable sources ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible