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11

For night trekking, I use a headlamp. Couple of reasons: Keeps your hands free. (Useful when you are walking up steep slopes) No worry of dropping them flashlight (Had happened to me once where my flashlight rolled down the hill) Advantages of a flashlight over a headlamp: More powerful and directional. (No need to strain your head in weird angles to ...


8

I tried out both options when I started night hiking and can share the following observations: Flashlights are generally more powerful and directional - you can point a beam of light much further away; useful if you are trying to see further around you, for example to determine where each fork in the trail leads. Headlamps are less powerful for the same ...


6

For search party purposes, bigger is almost always better, both from the perspective of the lost individual - he/she may be able to see the light from a distance and make themselves more visible or move towards the light, and from the searcher trying to see their target, perhaps an unconscious individual - spotting clothing or non-natural material is much ...


5

I have used both for night hiking, and I like a headlamp way better. The main reasons are that it leaves the hands free, and the light is aiming roughly in the direction I'm looking. I made my own headlamp with 4 white LEDs in series: This seems to be a good brightness for hiking and seeing the ground in front of you. Having it built into a hat is also ...


4

I cannot say if there are standard signals between mountaineers, however from hiking I know the following three light signals are used: Warning: Wave the flashlight back and forth to signal a warning to those around you. Use this signal when you spot a potential danger such as a wild animal, steep cliff or unsafe terrain. OK:Point your flashlight toward ...


4

The UltraFire product is manufactured by WhaFat Technological Company, which is based in Hong Kong. Their products look very similar to SureFire flashlights, so it's possible that UltraFires themselves are clones/knockoffs. That said, the WhaFat website recommends purchasing from an official dealer, but they don't mention any. ultrafire-shop.net claims to ...


3

Mountain distress signals vary slightly depending on what country your in. In the UK the general distress signal is to use a whistle (Alpine distress signal), not a torch. This is so it can be identified in poor visibility. Many backpacks come with a whistle integrated into the webbing, the bright orange bit below: It's usually 6 blasts of a whistle at ...


2

I'd think that it will depend very much on what you search for: do you expect the person to respond, e.g. put up whatever scrap of reflective material they have with them when they see your search-light? In that case, and open landscape a highly brilliant lamp would be good: you could sweep a large space slowly with such a light and look for reflections. ...


2

In my personal experience, a headlamp is much better. It doesn't have the directional capabilities of a traditional flashlight, but it leaves your hands free for other tools. During an emergency hike/climb down a mountain in sub-zero temperatures I needed to use my hands to hold on to trekking polls and other hand-holds and the headlamp saved my life, I ...


1

A flashlight is in my experience much better for traveling at night. This because: It throws out a more powerful beam than almost any headlamp - The problem with a headlamp is that any bright enough beam to be useful on most trails is going to affect your vision (especially if you wear glasses) Most headlamps are only comfortable to wear for relatively ...


1

If you decide on something really bright, check out scuba diving lights. They are made extra tough, extra bright and are waterproof. And, you want to carry two: One bright one for searching and a smaller one for reading something, examining a person for injuries, etc. You also want the smaller one as a backup just in case something happens to the larger one. ...


1

With regards to searching or SAR, I think @Rory Alsop, hit the nail on the head. You really want a brighter and wider field of light when searching for someone. However, as an avid backpacker, you don't need that many lumens. So... if you are searching for a path or night hiking, I use a 70 lumen headlamp that has worked fantastically well and when I need to ...



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