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9

A fuller history: They were approved for a few years (2004-2007) for use in Yosemite, which is a proving ground for bear-resistant containers. In 2007 I believe there were a couple incidents where bears were able to puncture an Ursack and "suck" food out of it. This led Yosemite to ban them from the park (and ultimately some other national parks followed ...


6

It depends on the kind of hike. But some of my 50 cents: If you don't want to take tools to cook, use food that comes self-supportive. If you don't have water, don't eat food that needs a lot of water (or dehydrating) If space is important, use dryfrozen food. If space is important, don't use food with lots of empty space in it, like normal bread, candy ...


6

If you normally have a coffee in the morning then you will be fine with a coffee in the morning out on the trail. It is part of your daily routine. It is useful to have something like red bull or energy drinks in a pack as part of your emergency rations as week. Not for long term but if you need to stretch a few final miles late in the day due to delays it ...


5

As far as I know you should be able to survive for quite a long time. I often hear about ocean racers who have just freeze-dried foods to eat and they live on that for more then 2-3 months at a time. There are no side effects, they are in fact very healthy. So I see no issues apart from a very dull taste that you can't live on this indefinitely. As far as ...


5

Well in my personal experience, I've never faced any issue with caffeine while on a trek. As mentioned by Rory, if coffee is a part of your morning ritual, it will not make much of a difference. Too much of caffeine is not good while on treks as it does dehydrate your body. A better substitute would be tea. Usually on higher altitude treks, tea is a beverage ...


5

Foraging is NOT looking at a plant and deciding if it's edible, nor is it looking in a book at a plant and then going looking for that plant. It's not possible to learn all the plants and it's not possible that all the plants will be in the area you forage. Foraging is about confidently identifying some edible plants. The two main components of this ...


5

In the test report of 2004 according to Ursack: Bears carried inadequately-secured Ursacks short distances suggesting that users should be able to locate most bags that might get carried off by bears. Distances carried during the four tests were 0.3m, 1.6 m, 5.8 m, and somewhere between 41 and 67 m. In those cases, the sack did prevent the bear from ...


5

You propose packing food deeply in your backpack. I'd specifically recommend against that. Bears (and other wild animals) have vastly more acute senses of smell than humans, and they won't hesitate to chew through your pack to get at anything buried there. Even if there aren't bears in an area, there are likely to be some kind of varmints (squirrels, ...


4

I think the regulations are so strict because the park service wants to keep a level of discipline about how hikers manage their food, so that none is accidentally left in a pack, and the oils and crumbs from food don't contaminate a pack. This avoids scenarios where food was left in a pack unintentionally. Bears don't hunt humans except in rare cases ...


4

Bear populations, bear problems, and aggressive bears are distributed extremely unevenly in California wilderness areas. There are dense populations of problem animals in a few small areas such as Yosemite Valley and Little Yosemite. These are areas with a lot of humans packed into a small space. You're going to the White Mountains, which gets very few human ...


4

According to Yosemite Park's website, bears have lost fear towards humans and will try to get food from whatever is the easiest way. This usually means that it's easier to break a car's window of wreck a campsite than going hunting. They have a keen sense of smell and will follow not just food, but products with various scents that we wouldn't think of as ...


3

For me, as a thumb rule, when on high altitude treks, I do not go for any food which is digestion intensive. i.e, any food which required a lot of oxygen to get digested is not favorable. You can always have chocolate bars/energy bars at higher altitudes. Herbal tea is something that keeps you hydrated and gives you decent amount of caffeine at the same ...


3

"Unlikely" is not the same as "won't happen." You're going to the White Mountains in California, so call the ranger station in Bishop and ask them. They will probably tell you that bears do exist there, so the probability is not zero. "It seems quite difficult to me to keep food at least 15 feet above the ground and 10 feet horizontally from a tree trunk. ...


3

I've had celiac for 8 years now. I am self described outdoor enthusiast and celiac is nothing that should hold you back from having fun. Out on the trail I eat quinoa, brown and black rice (black rice is super healthy), dried fruits, nuts. I'll normally bring one or two cans of soup or baked beans, sometimes canned chili, corn tortillas, jerky, lentils, ...


3

The best recommendation is to take all necessary precautions for yourself, wildlife and the fauna. What measures make sense depends on the area you are visiting. For example, in more remote parts of the east coast (Maine, New-Brunswick, etc.) you will only find black bears and they tend to be pretty shy. In these areas, many people rely on hanging their ...


2

As a rafter I have taken part in lots of discussions about this and couldn't resist any longer so have set up an experiment to test this. I hypothesize that the drained cooler will hold ice longer due to the insulating effect of air--as Snitse has described above. Convection will reduce air's effectiveness but, as Snitse points out, it is still far ...


2

I often found myself following these steps from Lofty Wiseman's Survival Guide, even though I was not in a life or death emergency situation, and never had any problems. It allows you to safe check all vegetation. These methods have proved themselves on several occasions during my time in the army. I am not encouraging anyone to use this method in a ...


2

My preferences are to minimize stove time. To my mind if you have a stove and a cooler that's luxury and you should have no problems at all. In the mornings I like to just boil a kettle, no stove at lunch, and full on cooking for dinner. Breakfast. Boil a kettle for tea or instant coffee. Also use the boiling water to make instant oatmeal. Supplement with ...


2

You left out a lot of particulars, like who exactly "we" is and whether you expect to camp for several days away from civilization, or will drive around enough that getting to a grocery store once a day or two isn't a problem. I have a similar situation (within the course details you provided) every year when I go to a conference in Phoenix and add about 10 ...


2

I've just ordered a large set of Spaghetteria packages, such as: Spaghetteria Funghi Spaghetteria Spinaci Aktiv Muschelnudels mit Frühlingsgemüse ... and many others Those are functionally identical to "official" outdoor meals, but at a fraction of the price, and I think the taste is quite good. They're my stock food when in the outdoors. I'm usually ...


2

I try to avoid the following: Carrying water (i.e., food that has lots of water in it). The exception is fresh fruits and vegetables, which are worth the weight in my opinion. Pre-made dehydrated backpacking crap. Overpriced and unappetizing. The key thing is that being in the backcountry shouldn't really change how you think about eating. You cook ...


2

There are various popular beliefs that alcoholic and caffeinated drinks "don't count" for hydration because alcohol and caffeine dehydrate you. In fact, beer consumed in moderation has a hydrating, rather than a dehydrating, effect,[Valtin 2002] and laboratory studies have shown that caffeinated soda is just as hydrating as water, i.e., the diuretic effect ...


2

I drink caffeine in mass quantities. It's hard to find me not drinking a coffee, Coke, or something similar, here in the regular world. But when I'm out in the backcountry, I only rarely drink it. I find that I just don't really need or want it. When I started my hike of the Appalachian Trail I brought a coffee press attachment for my Jetboil and coffee, ...


1

The way I see it, you have two options: Buy some astronaut ice cream. Bring/find some ice and make ice cream in a plastic sandwich bag. I bet you could easily replace the ice in the standard 'ice cream in a bag' recipes with snow. You might have some trial-and-error to get the proportions right, but I bet it would work. Personally, I would just bring ...


1

Jerky is awesome, or Tonkabites, which is buffalo meat and cranberries. Some jerky brands have lower sodium and no nitrates. I also like those Babybell little gouda cheese things, high calorie and really satisfying. Or any cheese for that matter. Dense calories. Also nuts.com has sprouted nuts that are then dehydrated and spiced, so they taste good and are ...


1

I have several gluten-intolerant people in my life, and though I haven't taken them camping, here's how I would feed them. Breakfast: for a short trip, bring some gluten-free muffins or bagels. For a longer trip, learn how to make a dough (premix the rice flour, xanthan gum etc at home) you can rise and then fry into English muffins. Not kidding, we did ...


1

I have bought dried barberries for cooking at Persian stores for many years. One green world has two varieties that can be bought for the fruit.


1

The answer to your question is no. North America is a huge region. Even California is vast and varied, e.g., we have miner's lettuce at low elevations, but not higher up. For a given subregion, e.g., low altitudes in the Transverse Ranges of California, it's fairly easy to learn enough to identify a few trail snacks that might (or might not) be available. ...


1

Here is a different twist on the question of how to best use block ice. Before refrigeration northern states used to saw block ice fron frozen lakes and store for the summer in "ice houses", log houses that used only the thermal inertia of massive amounts of ice stacked together. We just returned from a 6 day canoe trip in which we used block ice to keep ...



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