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31

The term you're looking for is "low-residue diet" or "low-residue meal" (for some reason, the medical community tends to avoid the term "poop" in their technical terminology). Simply googling on those terms will get you a lot of good advice; WebMD and Wikipedia are good starting points. A low residue diet is a diet designed to reduce the frequency and ...


19

Here in Slovenia, the use of wild garlic is quite widespread. Although the whole plant, including bulbs, is edible, leaves are most commonly used. I tried only leaves so far, so I can share my experience with only them. Gathering Young, light-green leaves are a bit more aromatic, but smaller; older are darker and larger. I pick a mix of both and look for ...


15

Nettles should be blanched to destroy the formic acid before eating (Handle with gloves of course). Bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil & prepare a bowl of ice water on the side. Once the water is boiling, plunge the nettles in the water for no more than a minute or so (the nettles should be bright green & not over cooked). Quickly drain ...


13

I have only had them as a tea with raspberry leaves. Refreshing enough, but nothing I'd actively forage to accomplish. However since the USDA report (direct PDF download) says that stinging nettles are 2.7% protein, and high in a number of vitamins and minerals, I think I'll try using them in a few dishes. Initial collection and preparation for cooking ...


11

Any cloth bag with a loose weave will also work. Closely woven bags are a second good choice, but won't breathe as well. Part of the reason for a basket, though, is that you'll also have a lot of structural support, and the goods will have less crushing, bumping, and bruising. You can use plastic fruit containers that have built in drainage and air holes ...


11

I usually don't carry any kind of stove with me when I go hunting - this could be anytime from September to November or in May and early June. The weather can vary wildly during these times and I've experienced every kind of weather, from 10 below (F) and snow, to 30 degrees and freezing rain, to 90 (F) and dry. I found that going without hot food for up ...


11

If you are referring to Crataegus, then yes Hawthorne is edible, the pomes are like tiny apples with two flower spots on the bottom. It is commonly made into jelly, syrups and country wine. Regarding the seed, you want to pull this out after cooking the pome just like you would the heavy solids of any other fruit. I know you mention raspberry and black ...


10

If in doubt, double bag... put them in a sealed bag of your choice, then put them in another sealed bag with the open end (of the first bag) facing towards the closed end of the second bag, if the first leaks the second should catch it.


10

Here is the list of stuff I would consider taking on longer hikes: trail mix chocolate muesli bars more expensive energy bars are great for really demanding stuff, where energy to weight ratio really counts (e.g. multi pitch climbing). They are also more filling than muesli bars. beef jerky dried sausage vacuum-packed hard cheese peanut butter or nutella ...


9

Your best bet is going to be small mylar pouches (any other thick plastic you can get your hands on will probably work just as well). They hold up much better than flimsy freezer bags and have a thick reassuring seal on the edge. You can get them resealable as shown, or you can weld non resealable bags closed. What you're really going for is something ...


9

One option, if you still want hot food with no real possibility for starting a fire, would be MREs (Meals Ready to Eat). These include a Flameless Ration Heater that rely on a contained chemical reaction to warm food. They are a bit on the bulky side though. Personally, for my lunches while backpacking I like Ready to Eat Tuna Salad Pouches along with some ...


8

Sap flow in trees is a result of sap pressure accumulated in the roots during a frost, which is then released when the temperature thaws during the day. Many tree species cannot be harvested because they do not develop high enough sap pressure to bleed (according to Venerable Trees, Inc.). One farm in BC reports that birch sap is harvested just after maple: ...


7

At least 60m away, and 5m high. I doubt that there is such a thing a bag that bears absolutely can't smell through. Bears and other animals with rhinariums (wet nose) not only smell better than humans, they smell in a different way, they can literally taste odours. A bears sense of smell is roughly 2100 times more sensitive than a humans. Even if you got a ...


7

I have good experiences using cloth grocery bags (note: breathability). Depending on how many mushrooms you are gathering it might be necessary to put something like a bowl/small basket into the bottom of the bag to keep the mushrooms from getting squished by the downwards pull of the bag.


7

Many people travel for days or weeks in bear country. Several existing questions on this site address bear and camp/food related issues. If you've never traveled in areas with bears before, you should definitely give these a read: What are the proper precautions/protocols for storing food while car camping in an area with bears? What precautions should I ...


7

I do a lot of strength training when not backpacking, and try to keep my protein up around ~140 grams per day, on average. I asked a related question over on the fitness.stackexchange.com site, and at this point make all my own meals (usually with my dehydrator) because I find pre-made-hiker-food to be junk. The lightest protein source I know of is simply ...


6

Out of some wonder, the peanut butter in our area comes in plastic jars, meaning that it is lighter than a normal jar. I save these plastic jars during the year and use them later on hikes. Also, in the local grocery stores I can buy some dairy products which come in plastic buckets and boxes (like this one, this or this) - I save these for trips and ...


6

I would probably use a small tupperware or similar, something like this. You can also get ones where the lid clips down which are probably more secure. If you are concerned about it leaking/coming open I would use some elastic bands to secure the lid and store it in a separate freezer bag to contain any leaks. Using a freezer bag as you suggest may work, ...


6

I've backpacked in places that have raccoons but I've never had a problem with them. Squirrels and a number of birds can also chew/peck their way through a bag to get at your food. I don't know what kind of birds you have in Michigan, but here in Idaho, Clark's Nutcrackers and magpies can be a nuisance. A mesh bag will probably allow them access to your ...


6

I don't understand why you're so centric around protein. There are protein bars, some of which contain over 20g of protein. There are also freeze dried meats which is actually more protein dense(higher protien-weight ratio) than protein bars. Freeze dried foods generally offer the best weight to calorie ratio, because they have almost no water weight. Even ...


6

Very carefully!! Seriously need to be blanched/boiled to render the Formic acid inert. Formic has a much higher effect on organics than its relative acidity would suggest. From here use like cabbage or such.


6

MREs. Not poop free, but if you start eating it a couple of days before the trek, you'll be amazed of how constipated you'll become. Sometimes I think this is by design, as a soldier doing his business on a bush with his pants down is an almost comical definition of a highly vulnerable target.


5

I'm pretty sure bears can distinguish fresh food from year old residues. Otherwise nothing you own could ever go into bear country. Our clothes, cell phones, wallets etc have all been to so many more restaurants than your average bear, yet bears almost never take this stuff. Additional evidence: finding old old french fries under the seat of my car after ...


5

Avoid foods that Are sticky or that leave a residue on fingers. It's hard enough to keep hygiene when backpacking. Require refrigeration. Maybe if you know it will be cold enough the whole time... but why Require being cooked through prior to eating (raw meats, etc). Cooking on long hikes is tricky enough and checking meat temp is difficult. Also ...


5

I think part of the answer to your question relates to WHERE in the Rockies you'll be visiting. Will you be in an area that is not visited much by humans, or will you be visiting a high-traffic area such as a national park or other popular tourist destination? If you will be hiking through an area that has few or sporadic hikers, then you really have ...


5

Granite, marble and jade are all common stones used for mortar/pestle combinations. There are probably many other stones that are safe, but you want to avoid the following: anything that is porous such as sandstone or dolomite anything that will break apart easily, mainly sedimentary stone anything that might expose you to metal toxicity such lead or ...


4

If you're looking for liquid/squeezable food you have quite a lot of options. Baby food in pre-made pouches. Surprisingly tasty, balanced meals and there's usually a range of texture options. Not cheap long term, but for a single dive each diver could easily carry enough to keep them well fuelled even if working hard. Buy a DIY pouch prep machine. [a ...


4

For sustaining a person long term in extreme conditions such as walking daily 15-25 miles in varying conditions, the biggest problem after having enough energy to walk is the ability to properly recover every night to do that again and again. To be able to recover well you need a good amount of protein every day, especially during the night, to get good ...


4

There are animals out there capable of figuring out how to get into your cache, Wolverines (a cousin of the racoon) are notorious for cracking into even the most cleverly hung food caches, but you don't really have to worry about them if you're only hanging your food for one night. Animals are more ambitious when they know their reward is food, but mere ...


4

Cooking or not, being able to heat water can be very useful in many cases. A basic alcohol stove, a little fuel, and a fireproof cup will weight less than 200g and fit all in the cup, so that's not much of a big deal. (All for less than 15$ for basic stuff). You'll get tea in the morning and you'll be able to boil water if needs be (sterilize water from a ...



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