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2

If you're feeling extra adventurous, you can eat it raw! If you fold up the nettle leaf, such that it "breaks" the little pricklers (they're like little needles) on leaf, you should be able to eat it without issue. The trick is to fold/roll the leaf up all over and tightly, so it forms a small compact ball. Your stomach acid is much stronger than the formic ...


2

Like a lot of other people have said, cooking neutralises the sting, but blending them to a paste, in an oil or a pesto works too. The reason for this is that the sting is not just the acid component, but the delivery mechanism: the little hairs on the leaves are hollow, and act as little hypodermic needles. If you blend the leaves, you destroy the little ...


2

We've made Indian-style saag paneer with nettle and it was great! Just substituted the spinach/mustard-greens with the nettle.


3

This is a good place to start: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2012/mar/30/nettle-recipes-hugh-fearnley-whittingstall Nettle Soup Adapted from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall Around 150g nettle tops 30-35g knob of butter 1 onion, peeled chopped 1 large or 2 smallish leeks, trimmed, washed and finely sliced 2 celery sticks, chopped ...


3

In Russia we make a soup with nettles. It's very very tasty! I have no receipts from myself, but I have some links on Russian receipt forum, maybe it will be useful.


3

My mother makes gnocchi with nettles. You can make them both with or without potatoes. Another nice recipe is meat/pork joint wrapped in nettle and bread. This one may be quite unpractical to prepare outdoor though as you need to bake it.


6

Very carefully!! Seriously need to be blanched/boiled to render the Formic acid inert. Formic has a much higher effect on organics than its relative acidity would suggest. From here use like cabbage or such.


14

Nettles should be blanched to destroy the formic acid before eating (Handle with gloves of course). Bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil & prepare a bowl of ice water on the side. Once the water is boiling, plunge the nettles in the water for no more than a minute or so (the nettles should be bright green & not over cooked). Quickly drain ...


12

I have only had them as a tea with raspberry leaves. Refreshing enough, but nothing I'd actively forage to accomplish. However since the USDA report (direct PDF download) says that stinging nettles are 2.7% protein, and high in a number of vitamins and minerals, I think I'll try using them in a few dishes. Initial collection and preparation for cooking ...


0

For breakfast I bring freezer-bag-cooking porridge with powdered Scottish oats and chocolate protein powder, mixed with nuts and honey. Each portion is in its own bag. You add warm water, stir, and you have your proteins served along with carbs. And it tastes great. Pros: easy to do once you have a bulk of the ingredients (I may point out to my source if ...


0

Assuming that you have easy access to drinkable water and some time when cooking, lentils can be soaked in cold water for an hour or two to reduce the cooking time. Soaked, red lentils should easily be done in about 10 minutes and not take much more time than most sorts of pasta. I would also reconsider if hard cheese is too heavy. A ripe hard cheese can ...


-1

Protein powder. Add it to your food. Add it to water. Add it to hot-water+powdered milk.


0

I found a way myself to carry peanut butter that works well. It is indirect: with this system, you don't carry peanut butter "as is". What you do, is to make your own fruit leather with added peanut butter. This adds plenty of calories and taste to your fruit leather and is also easy to transport. The drawback is, you can't put too much in any leather tray ...


0

The most efficient "food" you can carry is the body fat you can afford to lose. In our younger days, we went on 12 to 14 day backpacking trips, with a much more varied diet than suggested in the other answers. We took freeze-dried breakfasts and dinners, bread, cheese, butter, sliced ham, chocolate, nuts, dried fruit, frozen orange juice (one 6 oz can per ...


7

I do a lot of strength training when not backpacking, and try to keep my protein up around ~140 grams per day, on average. I asked a related question over on the fitness.stackexchange.com site, and at this point make all my own meals (usually with my dehydrator) because I find pre-made-hiker-food to be junk. The lightest protein source I know of is simply ...


6

I don't understand why you're so centric around protein. There are protein bars, some of which contain over 20g of protein. There are also freeze dried meats which is actually more protein dense(higher protien-weight ratio) than protein bars. Freeze dried foods generally offer the best weight to calorie ratio, because they have almost no water weight. Even ...


1

Some parks require you to have a bear canister. Here in the Rocky Mountains if you camp up in the mountains(no trees to sling a bag) you're usually required to have a canister, not because of bears but marmots. Bear canisters might be a little much, but its a sure fire way to prevent animals from getting in your food.Once I bought one, I've always used it ...


3

To carry raw eggs, leave 'em in their shells, put them in an old peanut-butter jar (plastic, watertight, wide mouthed). FILL the rest of the jar with water and close the lid. The water keeps the eggs from breaking, as long as there isn't any air space, and they will last at least a week in good weather. That's less than 90° greater than freezin'. This ...


3

I started out cooking actual meals, which was time consuming and required a lot of clean up. Its not practical to pack out waste from food prep cleanup(like waste water), and I started to realize it was not in good ethic to do so. So I started with the mentality boil don't cook. I've gone ahead and invested in a MSR WindBoiler(similar to the jetboil). This ...


4

Cooking or not, being able to heat water can be very useful in many cases. A basic alcohol stove, a little fuel, and a fireproof cup will weight less than 200g and fit all in the cup, so that's not much of a big deal. (All for less than 15$ for basic stuff). You'll get tea in the morning and you'll be able to boil water if needs be (sterilize water from a ...


11

I usually don't carry any kind of stove with me when I go hunting - this could be anytime from September to November or in May and early June. The weather can vary wildly during these times and I've experienced every kind of weather, from 10 below (F) and snow, to 30 degrees and freezing rain, to 90 (F) and dry. I found that going without hot food for up ...


3

Just considering weight: The great advantage is that you save weight by not carrying a stove and fuel, a pot, a Sierra cup and a largish spoon for stirring. The disadvantage is that you carry more weight than if you had taken freeze-dried or dehydrated food. That is, you have to carry the water content of all your food, which can add up, unless you subsist ...


3

Pros You don't need to carry a stove or fuel. The space and weight that would be spent on these can be devoted to other things, or eliminated altogether. You don't need to take the time to cook things. If there's any meal preparation involving rehydration, it generally just involves putting water into the meal package a certain time before you plan to eat ...


0

I agree with the double-bagging or using a plastic tub inside a bag or the other way around. I think the best thing you can do is to test out various methods/containers before you go. It will allow you to find out what works and will also allow you to practice having to deal with the messy stuff at home where you can figure out what else you might need to ...


2

I've lived in Michigan for 20 years and have spent a lot of time backpacking in state, both in the UP and in lower MI. We've always followed the rules for storing food, hanging everything associated with cooking and eating along with all toiletries in a tree away from the trunk UNLESS we're at backcountry campsites that have bear poles or boxes, then we use ...


1

I'll add to the existing answers by saying that the time of year likely does matter. I've been the Canadian Rockies up by Banff and some of those trails are heavily traveled. But, during the berry season (autumn), that doesn't stop bears from coming around even when you're not cooking something delicious. If you talk to folks who have hiked up there a ...


0

I've done a good bit of backpacking in the south where raccoons/possums/rats can get bad. I usually will wrap all the food in the plastic bag and tie it tightly shut. Then put that into a stuff sack that is hung from a tree. Try to find a long branch and get it as far away from the trunk as possible. Also, make sure not to put any food in any other bags ...


4

There are animals out there capable of figuring out how to get into your cache, Wolverines (a cousin of the racoon) are notorious for cracking into even the most cleverly hung food caches, but you don't really have to worry about them if you're only hanging your food for one night. Animals are more ambitious when they know their reward is food, but mere ...


6

I've backpacked in places that have raccoons but I've never had a problem with them. Squirrels and a number of birds can also chew/peck their way through a bag to get at your food. I don't know what kind of birds you have in Michigan, but here in Idaho, Clark's Nutcrackers and magpies can be a nuisance. A mesh bag will probably allow them access to your ...



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