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1

There are animals out there capable of figuring out how to get into your cache, Wolverines (a cousin of the racoon) are notorious for cracking into even the most cleverly hung food caches, but you don't really have to worry about them if you're only hanging your food for one night. Animals are more ambitious when they know their reward is food, but mere ...


2

I've backpacked in places that have raccoons but I've never had a problem with them. Squirrels and a number of birds can also chew/peck their way through a bag to get at your food. I don't know what kind of birds you have in Michigan, but here in Idaho, Clark's Nutcrackers and magpies can be a nuisance. A mesh bag will probably allow them access to your ...


1

We have over 40 years of experience in black bear country, zero in Grizzly country. The black bear's nose is exquisitely sensitive to food that is here. We have frequently eaten in our tent in bad weather (but never cooked food or stored food or spilled food in the tent), and the tent has not been subsequently attractive to bears. Not sure how much detail ...


2

If you've got bacon grease or donut glaze smeared on your tent floor, then you'd better wash it off before you head back to bear country. Otherwise, eating food in your tent now shouldn't affect it's flavor a year from now. Remember that food in your tent will draw other creatures to investigate the scent - such as mice and ants. Mice will certainly ...


2

I think part of the answer to your question relates to WHERE in the Rockies you'll be visiting. Will you be in an area that is not visited much by humans, or will you be visiting a high-traffic area such as a national park or other popular tourist destination? If you will be hiking through an area that has few or sporadic hikers, then you really have ...


3

Many people travel for days or weeks in bear country. Several existing questions on this site address bear and camp/food related issues. If you've never traveled in areas with bears before, you should definitely give these a read: What are the proper precautions/protocols for storing food while car camping in an area with bears? What precautions should I ...


5

I'm pretty sure bears can distinguish fresh food from year old residues. Otherwise nothing you own could ever go into bear country. Our clothes, cell phones, wallets etc have all been to so many more restaurants than your average bear, yet bears almost never take this stuff. Additional evidence: finding old old french fries under the seat of my car after ...


2

Removing water from the cooler always means the ice lasts longer - solid (ice) transfers heat slowest, then gas (air inside cooler), then liquid (melted ice). This is explained by the Zeroteh Law of thermodynamics. All three work to achieve equilibrium by becoming the same temperature. Remove the fastest heat-transferring part and your ice lasts longer. ...


3

GoToobs. They're food grade plastic, super light weight, and reusable.


2

Try Coghlan's Squeeze Tubes (available from REI) http://www.rei.com/product/696007/coghlans-squeeze-tubes-package-of-2 The base of the tube opens up so it's easy to fill and then closes securely. It's easy to squeeze the contents into your mouth, or on to crackers or other media for eating, without using utensils or trying to lick/scrape the gooey contents ...


6

Your best bet is going to be small mylar pouches (any other thick plastic you can get your hands on will probably work just as well). They hold up much better than flimsy freezer bags and have a thick reassuring seal on the edge. You can get them resealable as shown, or you can weld non resealable bags closed. What you're really going for is something ...


3

Out of some wonder, the peanut butter in our area comes in plastic jars, meaning that it is lighter than a normal jar. I save these plastic jars during the year and use them later on hikes. Also, in the local grocery stores I can buy some dairy products which come in plastic buckets and boxes (like this one, this or this) - I save these for trips and ...


5

I would probably use a small tupperware or similar, something like this. You can also get ones where the lid clips down which are probably more secure. If you are concerned about it leaking/coming open I would use some elastic bands to secure the lid and store it in a separate freezer bag to contain any leaks. Using a freezer bag as you suggest may work, ...


8

If in doubt, double bag... put them in a sealed bag of your choice, then put them in another sealed bag with the open end (of the first bag) facing towards the closed end of the second bag, if the first leaks the second should catch it.


2

You could actually try a mushroom bag, which is basically a cloth bag with a plastic liner that usually has a draw string to keep it tight. My mother in law has one, she uses it for shop brought mushrooms sometimes (you can also get similar potato ones) but the idea then is you can store them straight away. They tend to stop sweating and moulding of the ...


1

Ground temperature up to 30 feet deep varies as a function of depth and the seasonal temperature. The further down you go, the more it "averages" the location's seasonal variations and the more it lags the seasonal changes. Hole in the ground In southwest canada (vancouver, for instance) you can expect that four feet down the ground will be around 50F ...


10

Any cloth bag with a loose weave will also work. Closely woven bags are a second good choice, but won't breathe as well. Part of the reason for a basket, though, is that you'll also have a lot of structural support, and the goods will have less crushing, bumping, and bruising. You can use plastic fruit containers that have built in drainage and air holes ...


6

I have good experiences using cloth grocery bags (note: breathability). Depending on how many mushrooms you are gathering it might be necessary to put something like a bowl/small basket into the bottom of the bag to keep the mushrooms from getting squished by the downwards pull of the bag.


2

A brown paper bag should allow them to breath and keep your dignity. Don't keep them in it too long though, it's better than plastic but still not as good as something that allows the air to circulate.



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