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1

Not tested yet. Criteria lightweight, long shelf life, low bulk, no cook, easy and cheap resupply. Oat meal [compressible]-amino acid: methionine, tryptophan. Powered milk [compressible]- amino acid: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, valine; electrolyte: sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium. Almond- (due to ...


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This is not a survival technique. The way to determine how many calories is in a particular food item is to measure the amount of heat energy emitted when an item is burned. Anything burned to ash is basically calorie free as far as food value goes. Ash is composed of whatever was unable to vaporize into smoke in a fire. The hotter the fire, the more ...


5

Carrying perishable foods is not practical, but it is doable. The only way to do it though is to keep your food cooled, and the easiest way to do that, when it's hot out, is to carry a cooler, which I have definitely gone backpacking with before: There are such things as solar powered coolers, which can keep your food cool without the necessity of ...


3

There are many methods of preserving food for days, weeks, or even years. Traditional methods include canning, pickling, smoking/jerky, and dehydration. There are modern counterparts to all of these. Canned food is not a good choice if you're carrying the food on your backs. Dehydrated and freeze-dried foods are your best bet, combined with non-perishable ...


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You can buy freeze dried meals such as Mountain House or Backpackers Pantry, which come in the form of sealed, airtight packages that are easy to pack, lightweight, and easy to prepare.


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Well, you need to choose food which will keep that long without refrigeration (and, indeed, at the temperatures you expect, probably higher than normal room temperature), and you need watertight containers or packaging, either for individual portions or resealable (the jungle tends to be wet).



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