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30

You are using your old used sneaker-like city-shoes, sport-shoes or jogging-shoes to go hiking? Well, those are made for really flat paths without lots of surface irregularities and they aren't designed for rough conditions (wet and/or cold, difficult terrain, bigger loose stones and so on). Saying that, hiking shoes/boots are better for those conditions, ...


16

My ankles sprain easily. I have good quality walking boots that give good ankle support, because I need them. You may not. Everyone’s different. Yes, they’re heavier than runners, significantly heavier, in fact, but for my situation, they’re worth it. When I’m on rough terrain, and especially if I’m also carrying a heavy backpack, I can sprain my ankles very ...


14

There are many who nowadays shun boots and prefer to have lightweight footwear in all terrains and most weather conditions. It's worth having a look at Chris Townsend's website. He has hiked many long distance trails, including some in the US and has put together an article on his blog about the topic of Lightweight Footwear. It would be worth reading ...


11

Big, heavy "waffle stomper" boots are mainly a relic of the past, along with wool knickers and steel canteens. For most conditions, modern running shoes work far better. Any weight on your feet cuts down on your efficiency much more than a similar amount of weight on your back. Also, the heavier your boots get, the harder it is to keep from getting blisters, ...


10

The simple answer for me is that my feet hurt less. There are two factors that cause foot pain with regular shoes. The first is that rocks poke your feet through the soles. The second is that without good ankle support, you use more muscles in your feet to balance on uneven terrain. Personally, I didn't realize how much pain was caused by my shoes until ...


7

One advantage I'm missing so far is that hiking boots also protect the ankles against the outside (not only against sprainng): from getting scratched by or hitting stones, wooden branches sticking up, or stuff like blackberry twines (which I find very bad as they scratch heavily over the front part of the ankle, particularly where that tendon is). Of ...


6

The simplest answer is this. Hiking boots, with their higher top, prevent material such as stones, mud, snow, and water from easily getting into the shoe. If I hike on a graveled trail for example, I must empty my walking shoes of small stones about every 5 miles. In rougher conditions, it is easy to step into a puddle, or snow drift, that is more than ...


6

As someone who's done a decent amount of hiking both with proper boots and a standby I used for years, hightop skateboarding shoes, here's the three major differences I've noticed: The boots definitely win in the waterproofness department. I would not do an extremely muddy trail in shoes. The boots have better traction but the significance of this is less ...


5

Good hiking boots also provide good arch and foot support. Even without the extra weight of a pack the constant stress on ones arches can be very fatiguing if not even damaging. Although humans were originally designed to go without footwear, most people today do not have feet that can go miles and miles without proper arch, toe and foot support. So, if ...


5

I climb in vibram five-fingers (KSO's), climbed in them for the first time in 2008 and loved them, where they excel is in roofs and overhanging problems because you can hook holds a lot easier with your toes, but for tougher wall climbing with small features (5.11+) I still use climbing shoes. There are some gyms that allow climbing barefoot, but for the ...


4

I have a pair without the toe strap. I wear them daily and hike in them regularly. They did take quite a while to break in and initially gave me blisters (mostly the side strap). My girlfriend has owned three different pairs of Chacos and here is what she has to say: The toe loops are worth it but take some getting used to! They are definitely more ...


3

Key thing is to get the shoes clean and dry. Wash the shoes at the hottest possible temperature and let them dry thoroughly. (Use a hair dryer on cool/warm setting carefully if needed). Use an anti fungal laundry rinse such as CANESTEN laundry wash if the problem is persistent. Don't wear the same shoes two days in a row - with barefoot shoes look at ...


3

Some options I have used in the past UV Pen - Strong UV Light will kill fungus Anti-Fungal Powder - Works just as well on shoes as it does on toes Anti-Fungal Cream - Same premise


3

портянки (portyanki) The Russian army wore portyanki (footcloths) up until the ministry of defence abolished them in 2008. There's an interesting article about them here, the author of which apparently wore portyanki for 695 days in the army.1 How to put on footcloths: spread the piece of cloth (40cm x 90cm) flat on the floor; put the foot closer to ...


3

Aside from the excellent answer by Michael Borgwandt, I have to add that a climbing shoe isn't just there for better gripping. Just like any other shoe, it also protects your feet from any sharp objects or rough surfaces that you may encounter along your trip. The more widely used paths have probably been worn down, but if you're on a new path, it is likely ...


3

One thing is that I doubt it's possible to train the toes to have significant strength; unlike the fingers, they are simply not built for that job. And most of the time, you have a lot more weight on your feet than on your hands. Injury and strain would be a big problem. Then there's the sweating: there's actually more sweat glands in your soles than ...


2

When you buy a new shoe, it's very nice to have one with thermo fitting or foam fitting technology. (Scarpa, Dynafit, black diamond, Fischer, are a few brands that have shoes with this support. What also helps if you have a Powerstrap (Velcro) and/or more than only one or two iron hoop to tight you boot. I've one with 4 and this works very well with my ...


2

No. I have gone through three pairs, two without the toe strap, and one with. The toe strap does not meaningfully stabilize my foot, and it makes my big toe kinda sore. I ended up shrinking the toe strap so it just tightly clings to the shoe, and my toe is on top. It feels weird without socks, but with socks it's great.


2

I find that hiking boots help protect my ankles and feet from twigs and things that can scratch or hit against them, help prevent rain from getting in (I can wear long pants with sneakers but still water will get inside), and protect my toes from stubbing them against rocks and boulders. Also the soles of the hiking boot offer more traction than the typical ...


2

The extra weight gives you more of a workout? I personally only use hiking boots when backpacking - due to the need for good stability. I have done Whitney 2x, half dome/cloud's rest 10x, other 14'ers, both climbing rapidly and running down in sneakers.


2

I've tried using newspaper in my boots several times. - I hike at least once a week in normally wet, muddy conditions in BC Canada. I usually stuff 4 large pages of newspaper in each boot. It really works and the boots dry in a matter of 6 hours! Before I knew this trick, I'd leave the boots to air dry, which took days and days. Eventually they'd be ...


2

I have a pair with the big-toe strap, and they're very comfortable when I wear them with toe socks. When I first got them, I tried wearing them barefoot, and found that I could only walk a few miles before I started to get blisters. The blisters weren't at the big-toe strap, they were where the other loop of webbing went over the top of my foot.


1

The trick to preventing chronic athletes foot in toe shoes is the same as with regular shoes, and that is to wear socks. Injinji toe socks are by far the most popular socks to wear with fivefingers shoes. They keep your shoes cleaner, and help prevent funguses from forming inside them. Just keep in mind that if you wear toe socks in your toe shoes, that ...


1

I only wear hiking boots if there is significant off trail or heavy scree. The last dozen or so expeditions (1 week + trips ~50 lb pack) I did I mostly wore MEC reef boots, or divers boots, sized to allow medium weight work socks. The routes we did were mostly horse trails in Willmore Wilderness or in Rocky Clearwater Recreation Area (Alberta). With this ...


1

Get the best fit possible. Then go with the soak them and walk them dry method. Wetting the leather softens it and as it drys the leather shrinks to your foot shape. And at the first sign of blisters stand in a stream. Removes heat and lubricates the area.



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