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9

Yes it does dry shoes much faster. When long distance hiking it is definitely a nice thing to be able to stop in town and dry your shoes overnight using newspapers. It will draw a lot of the dampness right out of your footwear. This is a known trick and many people will attest to its magic. First ball up some newspaper. I usually use two large sheets ...


9

The category of shoe you are looking for is an approach shoe, the name comes from their use by mountain climbers as their shoe of preference for approaching a climbing pitch. They're lighter than hiking boots and are designed for trails and for scrambling. Approach shoes tend to have smoother soles than hiking boots but are usually sturdier than a climbing ...


5

If you have a dry airflow available (some huts have stands where heated air goes through the shoes), that is of course faster. However, just leaving your boots stand does not lead to much air flow. With (news)paper, you can easily take out the moisture and put in a new, dry paper. That is actually the key: If you just stuff your boots with paper and leave ...


5

While airflow does dry shoes, it is much less effective than physically wicking moisture away using towel, some or paper. Capillary action is very effective at removing water from anything, and wide fibre or coarse paper, such as newspaper, or better still, tissue or kitchen towel or swimmers' chamois are your best bet on the trail or after a wet hike.


5

Just like you I enjoy hiking in VFFs and I wondered how it would be to do a long backpacking trip in them. I chose the seemingly short 74 mile PCT section in Washington state, that has about 20,000' of elevation gain and loss and most of the trail is rocky. First day was great, just as any day hike, even with the heavy pack. Although my feet started to hurt ...


4

We are all different and this problem is nothing rare. What you are describing is called overpronation, which means that you roll more on the inside of your foot when you walk. This is something that is rooted in your pattern of movement, i.e something that is very hard to change. The best way to remedy this would be to add some kind of padding to your ...


4

as far as the issue of warmth - they do make special five-finger, wool socks for the VFF that fit perfectly with the shoes. I've combined these and they work great in cold weather. the only time i ever had a bad experience in my VFF was walking several miles on asphalt. trails with rocks, streams, mossy paths - no problem.


4

I know the author of the original question has already make their purchase, but for anyone else out there, I would recommend getting a set of mountain-grade leather boots, like the La Sportiva Nepal. They are much kinder to your feet - plastic boots break your feet in, not the other way around!


3

What sort of snow conditions are you running in? For dry, powdery snow, the best option is a pair running shoes that have aggressive tread (search for "trail running shoes"), but in wet, icy snow, metal screws or spikes will give you the extra grip you're looking for. I can't think of anything that will help more than it will hurt on icy pavement other than ...


2

I do believe that what Don Branson said in the comments is very much right on the money. I have a friend whom have worked withe leather for quite some time now and according to him, a round leather lace should be the absolute best approach if you want something with more staying power than a normal braided string. PS. Just remember to keep those leather ...


2

Heel hooks and toe hooks will probably hurt... My biggest concern is due to the individual toes this might make small foot holds uncomfortable. With a traditional climbing shoe the pressure is divided across the sole and all your toes are level inside the shoe. With a FiveFingers if the toe hold is small such that it's just your big toe on it, that will be ...


2

This may sound a little too weird to most of the people, but trust me, nothing worked better (and ultimately hell a lot cheaper) than a normal canvas shoe with its sole slightly brushed with a sand-paper. It worked amazingly well and with comfort. I use them regularly where I go for an early morning short-hike at least thrice in a week. Try them out before ...


2

So, I have (I think) the opposite problem - the outside edges of my shoes wear more quickly than the inside edges. This kind of problem is common among runners, you can look at running websites for ideas about how to fix it. I was never able to fully fix the problem, buuuut... Treating the symptoms instead of the underlying problem works for me. I keep ...


1

I've had the opposite problem. My feet are very wide from decades of mocassin use. So my ideas might not work. Certainly lacing techniques are worth trying. Normally I don't find these very effective with a low top shoe. One technique however that may work: Lace up the fore foot for comfort, tie a square knot, then lace up the rest of the shoe. When ...


1

I got back into doing outdoors stuff after a seventeen year hiatus. I used to be quite active and have a lot of what was high-endish kit by the standards of the late 80s/early 90s. When I got it all out of the attic it suddenly seemed very heavy compared to the kit a couple of my friends use on their missions and much of it just looked weird when seen ...


1

I hiked about 1000 miles this year in VFF KSO's, most of which was on the PCT. My pack weight varied from 20-35 lbs. The only serious issue I had was the occasional badly stubbed toe. I used dirty girl gaiters. Like you I have been wearing VFF's everywhere for several years. Also, normal shoes cause me pain. There was very little snow on the PCT in ...



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