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37

The only gear you need is a good, comfortable pair of running shoes and any cheap backpack (extra points for Hello Kitty). There is a popular belief, probably based on pop-culture images dating back to the 1960s, that people need big, heavy hiking boots, or that ankle support is necessary if you're going to carry heavy loads or walk on uneven ground. ...


13

Two ways to get started on a hike: with either your right foot, or your left foot :P First and foremost you need comfortable footwear. Doesn't matter what it is to get started, I've led people over mountain ranges and all they wore were cross trainers. When you get more serious into it, then you should determine what type of trails you want to hike on and ...


10

Start small and simple. The important thing is to get back into the habit of walking long distances and times again. You probably haven't walked a mile in a while. For starters, walk around your neighborhood. Walk to the store. Walk to the movies. Walk to the bar (and stumble home again). Google maps provides walking times, distance and directions.; ...


9

Care for your neoprene water shoes as you would for any neoprene wetsuit. http://scubadiverlife.com/2011/03/15/scuba-wetsuit-care-101-removing-odors-extending-suit-life/ You can use any search engine and search for 'wetsuit soap' or 'wetsuit wash' and will find suitable products. Stop by any dive shop where you are travelling and they will likely have ...


6

Most of the answers seem to be telling you how to walk so I'll assume that's covered. I think part of this is motivation as well - one thing I have enjoyed is getting a hiking book with some destinations to see, which will get you out of the house and going to see something instead of just wandering around. Maybe check this book out: 60 Hikes within 60 ...


6

The most important thing is a bottle of water, which you can carry in any kind of backpack (does not have to be a special one for a start). Further more, it depends very much on what terrain you like to go hiking. Comfortable running shoes are fine if the trail mostly consists of normal soil, but I would recommend hiking shoes with ankle support if you ...


5

The single most important piece of equipement you need is a good reference on the hiking trails around where you live. Read it through, pick a few that you want to do. Those books usually give you a good idea of how long it takes and how hard the hike is. For the rest, Ben Crowell has a pretty good answer. Do a few (or just one) hikes and adjust your ...


5

Start by wetting them so you don't get mold into the air. With a weak Lysol solution, scrub them with a toothbrush. Let them dry, and spray them with MiraZyme. Or as ShemSeger says, just get new ones :)


5

I climb in vibram five-fingers (KSO's), climbed in them for the first time in 2008 and loved them, where they excel is in roofs and overhanging problems because you can hook holds a lot easier with your toes, but for tougher wall climbing with small features (5.11+) I still use climbing shoes. There are some gyms that allow climbing barefoot, but for the ...


4

Key thing is to get the shoes clean and dry. Wash the shoes at the hottest possible temperature and let them dry thoroughly. (Use a hair dryer on cool/warm setting carefully if needed). Use an anti fungal laundry rinse such as CANESTEN laundry wash if the problem is persistent. Don't wear the same shoes two days in a row - with barefoot shoes look at ...


4

I'll offer up my experiences. I spent a summer in the Sea of Cortez, in which the night time lows didn't go under 100f and the sea water temperature was above 90f for months. It was around 20 degrees latitude, and was extremely hot. In pure sun like that, you need to keep the sun off of your skin, period. You will be hot no matter what you do. There's no ...


4

The type of boot you want will depend greatly on what sort of hiking you are doing, both in terms of distance and terrain. Personal preference also plays a strong role. For day walks on decent paths you will probably be fine with a sturdy pair of trainers or running shoes. Whereas for longer routes over rougher terrain, a studier boot if probably better, as ...


4

As others said, you don't need special equipment. Shoes: If you're going on sufficiently marked, easy short trails, you can even do it in bad shoes or barefoot. Our family, including my 6 year old has covered enough trails under 3 miles in Crocs. Having said that, I do most of my shorter hikes in running shoes, and longer ones (6+ hours) in hiking shoes. ...


4

Hiking isn't too different from walking, except that the terrain may be rougher (depending on the path) and navigation might be more difficult (again, depending on the path). I am in the northeastern U.S. and can tell you that most people already own the equipment to hike many of the most difficult all-day mountain trails in my region. You're not even ...


3

Another good idea would be to remember back to your Boy Scout days. Scouts are required to always to bring their ten essentials: Hydration (Water bottle ... probably 1 or 2 liters) Illumination (If you won't be out late, you can probably leave this) Extra Clothing (A lightweight jacket that still keeps you warm) Pocket knife (multitool) Matches ...


3

I lean towards light and fast dry running shoes such as the Lone Peak from Altra. This shoe goes under $100 on sale. It also comes with a gator-ready velcro at the back. There is no ankle support which I don't personally consider a problem. I've seen this shoe recommended at trail shops. They seem to be quite popular on long trails nowadays. I recommend ...


3

Some options I have used in the past UV Pen - Strong UV Light will kill fungus Anti-Fungal Powder - Works just as well on shoes as it does on toes Anti-Fungal Cream - Same premise


3

портянки (portyanki) The Russian army wore portyanki (footcloths) up until the ministry of defence abolished them in 2008. There's an interesting article about them here, the author of which apparently wore portyanki for 695 days in the army.1 How to put on footcloths: spread the piece of cloth (40cm x 90cm) flat on the floor; put the foot closer to ...


3

The other answers covered what you need as far as equipment goes - which isn't much - but I didn't see any that talked about what you need to know. You need to know about any potential dangers and how to avoid them. For example, in the DFW area: know how to recognize and avoid the types of poisonous snakes (and any other dangerous wild animals) that live ...


3

The solution is to invest in an actual pair of trail running shoes, they are stiffer, and snugger, and compensate for all of the issue that you're having with your road runners there. I have a pair of asics trail runners: asics gel fuji trabuco 3 They have a surprisingly stiff sole, they are snug even when not laced, and are extremely stable. I also ...


3

Rinsing them in clean water when you are finished using them will definitely help stop them smelling. To deal with the current smell I would just leave them in a sink/bucket of clean water for a couple of hours/overnight. I wouldn't worry too much about drying them as long as they are cleaned. As you said using soap is not a a good idea unless you get ...


2

Aside from the excellent answer by Michael Borgwandt, I have to add that a climbing shoe isn't just there for better gripping. Just like any other shoe, it also protects your feet from any sharp objects or rough surfaces that you may encounter along your trip. The more widely used paths have probably been worn down, but if you're on a new path, it is likely ...


2

One thing is that I doubt it's possible to train the toes to have significant strength; unlike the fingers, they are simply not built for that job. And most of the time, you have a lot more weight on your feet than on your hands. Injury and strain would be a big problem. Then there's the sweating: there's actually more sweat glands in your soles than ...


2

When you buy a new shoe, it's very nice to have one with thermo fitting or foam fitting technology. (Scarpa, Dynafit, black diamond, Fischer, are a few brands that have shoes with this support. What also helps if you have a Powerstrap (Velcro) and/or more than only one or two iron hoop to tight you boot. I've one with 4 and this works very well with my ...


2

I solved the problem with a combination approach. Given that throwing them away was one option, I didn't see the point in trying anything weak. We all know the phrase "kill the mold on your shoes or destroy them trying". These are tough sandals and have seen quite a bit of abuse during the years. I'm a bit emotionally attached, which means that I don't ...


2

Which is the best clothing in extreme heat? The answer to this is; what have people who have lived in deserts for thousands of years done?! Desert peoples have adapted their clothing and culture to provide the most efficient desert survival techniques, so Which is the best clothing in extreme heat? think desert tribes, Bedouins or touaregs, etc. What do ...


2

I find that hiking boots help protect my ankles and feet from twigs and things that can scratch or hit against them, help prevent rain from getting in (I can wear long pants with sneakers but still water will get inside), and protect my toes from stubbing them against rocks and boulders. Also the soles of the hiking boot offer more traction than the typical ...


2

I've tried using newspaper in my boots several times. - I hike at least once a week in normally wet, muddy conditions in BC Canada. I usually stuff 4 large pages of newspaper in each boot. It really works and the boots dry in a matter of 6 hours! Before I knew this trick, I'd leave the boots to air dry, which took days and days. Eventually they'd be ...


1

You asked about equipment & training. What you didn't ask, but may be useful is where to hike and who to hike with. There are hiking & outdoor clubs all over the place. Most of them will accept beginners. Start on easier hikes and work your way up. You'll also get a chance to ask others on their equipment choices. To find these clubs, just do a ...


1

Use MeetUp to find local hiking groups. They can lead you to great hikes, and provide company and safety in numbers. @njzk2's answer has good recommendations for equipment you should consider for any hike. I used to use the Afoot and Afield series of books to find good hikes in my area.



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