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18

Here in Slovenia, the use of wild garlic is quite widespread. Although the whole plant, including bulbs, is edible, leaves are most commonly used. I tried only leaves so far, so I can share my experience with only them. Gathering Young, light-green leaves are a bit more aromatic, but smaller; older are darker and larger. I pick a mix of both and look for ...


10

Any cloth bag with a loose weave will also work. Closely woven bags are a second good choice, but won't breathe as well. Part of the reason for a basket, though, is that you'll also have a lot of structural support, and the goods will have less crushing, bumping, and bruising. You can use plastic fruit containers that have built in drainage and air holes ...


6

I have good experiences using cloth grocery bags (note: breathability). Depending on how many mushrooms you are gathering it might be necessary to put something like a bowl/small basket into the bottom of the bag to keep the mushrooms from getting squished by the downwards pull of the bag.


4

First things first you need to contact the correct authorities. You require written permission to trap crayfish in the UK. There was an episode of River Cottage where they trapped them on the River Kennet. The Gov website doesn't list where you can or cannot trap signals, as you need landowners and angling club permission to trap on our lakes and rivers. ...


3

Wikipedia is basically right – you can safely eat it (according to the German Wikipedia article the whole plant, however, the leaves are the most used part) and here in Germany they sometimes even sell the leaves in the supermarket. The typical use I know of is the one that is given in the cited Wikipedia text you gave, i.e. adding the leaves to a salad or ...


2

A brown paper bag should allow them to breath and keep your dignity. Don't keep them in it too long though, it's better than plastic but still not as good as something that allows the air to circulate.


2

Yes it is and tasty too. There are some good recipes at the riverford.co.uk recipe pages. I've cooked most of the recipes on that page, I particularly like the Wet & Wild Garlic Risotto and Spring green & Parmesan Tart. I've never tried eating the flowers though I've also read they were edible. I also didn't know that some Yarg was wrapped in wild ...


2

Wild garlic is perfectly edible. My usual ways of cooking it are either to eat it raw (after washing) as a salad leaf, or to saute it like spinach (and it will reduce by a similar amount). It can either be cooked on its own, or mixed with spinach. The only caveat I have is that some people find that eating a lot (2 x similar portion of spinach) may have a ...


2

Wild garlic is very definitely edible and quite delicious! I eat all parts of it (leaves, stems and flowers) but usually only when it is young (before the flowers are fully out). I think it is delicious wilted in a frying pan with some butter or olive oil (like spinach). I've also used it to make pesto (in place of basil). Don't be put off by the ...


2

You could actually try a mushroom bag, which is basically a cloth bag with a plastic liner that usually has a draw string to keep it tight. My mother in law has one, she uses it for shop brought mushrooms sometimes (you can also get similar potato ones) but the idea then is you can store them straight away. They tend to stop sweating and moulding of the ...


1

I've just been sent this article in the Telegraph about it It says: At this time of year (May) the flowers (a nice edible addition to a plate) are also a giveaway: delicate, thin, six white-petalled things forming into rough globes that look like exploding fireworks. The true test of wild garlic however is the scent. Usually you will smell it ...



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