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18

Here in Slovenia, the use of wild garlic is quite widespread. Although the whole plant, including bulbs, is edible, leaves are most commonly used. I tried only leaves so far, so I can share my experience with only them. Gathering Young, light-green leaves are a bit more aromatic, but smaller; older are darker and larger. I pick a mix of both and look for ...


16

The first solution that comes to mind is a "zeer", or pot-in-pot refrigerator. However, this functions best in hot and dry environments as it relies on evaporation to work. Such a device is constructed by nesting one clay pot inside another, with a layer of sand between them (about an inch on the bottom, a few inches on the sides). The sand is then soaked ...


12

Although technology has brought us many conveniences most of them require supporting power or other technology. You seem set on refrigeration and you say: "I am willing to go to just about any extent short of buying a fridge and a generator." Perhaps you should consider solar panels (photovoltaic) and an electric refrigerator. Both technologies are ...


8

For any reasonable depth (ie. something you'd be willing to dig without specialized machinery), a deeper hole makes for a more stable temperature. The extra mass of soil surrounding your cellar acts to average out temperature changes: shallow burial averages out day-night shifts, while deeper averages out seasonal changes as well. The end result is that a ...


6

You'll need to do several things: Change your habits and foods Work Combine several techniques First, you need to more carefully consider the necessity of refrigeration. Refrigerators are used to keep food in a "safe" temperature zone where bacteria is less active, and this requires temperatures close to freezing. Passive cooling, such as root cellars ...


5

No, it is not true that necessarily the deeper you get the cooler it gets. For really deep holes it is actually the opposite, the deeper you get the warmer the temperature gets. This is called the Geothermal Gradient. This states that temperature goes up 25C per 1KM of depth. For the first couple of meters the temperature will likely drop or raise ...


3

Wikipedia is basically right – you can safely eat it (according to the German Wikipedia article the whole plant, however, the leaves are the most used part) and here in Germany they sometimes even sell the leaves in the supermarket. The typical use I know of is the one that is given in the cited Wikipedia text you gave, i.e. adding the leaves to a salad or ...


3

If your ambient temperatures (air/water/earth) don't get down below refrigerator temperatures (2-4 C), and in summer I suspect they don't, then the second law of thermodynamics says you can't do this without an energy source. Since electricity is out, you could consider a propane refrigerator.


3

Nah, AFAIK Leeches don't sniff/smell at all. Their main form of prey detection is thought to be by thermoreception, meaning Sensitivity to body heat, which is why warm blooded animals and mostly mammals are their preys. They do get attracted towards Water/Wetness. Though you are claiming to be having similar sort of a clothing, I believe you two must not ...


3

Because water evaporates at any temperature over 32 DegF, a swamp cooler or evaporative cooler is possible in any climate that needs cooling (though perhaps not in a powerful enough fashion depending on the cooling required). In a still body of water, the evaporation rate is proportional (in some form) to the humidity of the air, the air temperature, the dew ...


2

It there is a well nearby use it. 1. by dropping sealed and floating containers to water and then using a net to get them back. This works very well with beer cans. 2. Put the food in a bucket and use rope to lower it near the water.


2

Yes it is and tasty too. There are some good recipes at the riverford.co.uk recipe pages. I've cooked most of the recipes on that page, I particularly like the Wet & Wild Garlic Risotto and Spring green & Parmesan Tart. I've never tried eating the flowers though I've also read they were edible. I also didn't know that some Yarg was wrapped in wild ...


2

Wild garlic is perfectly edible. My usual ways of cooking it are either to eat it raw (after washing) as a salad leaf, or to saute it like spinach (and it will reduce by a similar amount). It can either be cooked on its own, or mixed with spinach. The only caveat I have is that some people find that eating a lot (2 x similar portion of spinach) may have a ...


2

Wild garlic is very definitely edible and quite delicious! I eat all parts of it (leaves, stems and flowers) but usually only when it is young (before the flowers are fully out). I think it is delicious wilted in a frying pan with some butter or olive oil (like spinach). I've also used it to make pesto (in place of basil). Don't be put off by the ...


1

I've just been sent this article in the Telegraph about it It says: At this time of year (May) the flowers (a nice edible addition to a plate) are also a giveaway: delicate, thin, six white-petalled things forming into rough globes that look like exploding fireworks. The true test of wild garlic however is the scent. Usually you will smell it ...


1

Ground temperature up to 30 feet deep varies as a function of depth and the seasonal temperature. The further down you go, the more it "averages" the location's seasonal variations and the more it lags the seasonal changes. Hole in the ground In southwest canada (vancouver, for instance) you can expect that four feet down the ground will be around 50F ...



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