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25

Note on boiling and stove weights, obviously there are dozens of stoves out there for every fuel. I'm just estimating based on commonly used stoves. Petroleum, Gas, White Gas, other liquid petrol products Stove weight: 12+ oz (340+ g) Water Boil per 100g fuel (rough): 5 to 6L Good: Works below freezing incredibly good heat fuel is easy to come by ...


6

To Dispose: Vent all the fuel, then puncture the sidewall. Once you have done this, it can be dumped in the appropriate recycling bin. Jetboil makes a tool to help with this, for which they've made a nice instructional video. To Use: An option to wasting that last 20% is to have an inverted canister setup. Since this relies on gravity instead of boiling ...


5

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


4

I would under no circumstances store your white gas stove that way. White gas is pretty volatile stuff and the increased chance of a leak is just not worth it. In addition, why? I am not sure what benefit this would provide. Yes, it is safe to store partially filled white gas canisters. I would not leave them in direct sunlight with hot temperatures ...


4

I personally highly recommend using an alcohol stove (pepsi-can stove, or some other variant), especially when hiking solo. In my opinion, the weight benefits far exceed the disadvantages. The benefits of Alcohol*: An alcohol stove is usually much lighter than a comparable white gas/propage/kerosene/gasoline. An alcohol stove also has no moving parts ...


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


3

This (Jetboil Crunchit Recycling Tool) was found by googling "crush isobutane fuel can" and reading this second result (right below the outoors.SE question) for the link.


2

Cheaper and easier solution. Attach your stove thingy (In my case, a pocket rocket). Open all the way and invert the can (away from flame sources obviously). Use a cheap and old fashioned church key to puncture the side. Total cost, approx. $0.50.



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