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28

Note on boiling and stove weights, obviously there are dozens of stoves out there for every fuel. I'm just estimating based on commonly used stoves. Petroleum, Gas, White Gas, other liquid petrol products Stove weight: 12+ oz (340+ g) Water Boil per 100g fuel (rough): 5 to 6L Good: Works below freezing incredibly good heat fuel is easy to come by ...


13

I'd try and be more specific towards the kind of the fuel we are talking about: White Gas Burns clean without any smell and/or effect on food taste. Accidental Spilling of the fuel is not much to be worried about. Evaporates very quickly, without leaving an odor. White gas is safer to store and transport than probably most of the other products. If ...


10

I was recently in Mexico and bought some unleaded gas at a gas station as stove fuel. I gave the unused fuel away to a taxi driver to put in his car. I suspect the same thing would work fine with the fuels sold as "white gas" or "camp fuel." I've heard conflicting information about exactly how this stuff is formulated, and for all I know it depends on the ...


10

While writing the question, I've figured out an answer. I just burn the fuel in the stove. Maybe this little knowledge would be helpful.


9

When I cook home-dehydrated food, I often rehydrate for a day - but not on the stove. In the morning, I boil water for coffee, pour some over dehydrated meat in a Nalgene, leave the lid on loosely until the water is only warm, then tighten the lid firmly. It spends the day in the pack and by dinner time the meat is rehydrated. For some vegetables, such as ...


8

I personally highly recommend using an alcohol stove (pepsi-can stove, or some other variant), especially when hiking solo. In my opinion, the weight benefits far exceed the disadvantages. The benefits of Alcohol*: An alcohol stove is usually much lighter than a comparable white gas/propage/kerosene/gasoline. An alcohol stove also has no moving parts ...


8

Here are a few methods If you have a lawnmower or weed eater you can dilute your gas by about 5% to 10% with it and burn it off that way, even if the fuel is 'bad'. Additionally, many fire departments will accept all manner of fuel, good or bad, and use it for backburning areas preparing for the summer fire season. Some auto parts stores will accept fuel ...


6

A tab ground up to produce a powder will have a higher surface area, therefore the fuel is more readily available for burning, this is why you can light a ground tab using a flint and steel. The flint and steel produces less energy for a shorter period of time than a match or lighter so it needs access to more fuel initially to catch (think of the fire ...


6

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


6

To Dispose: Vent all the fuel, then puncture the sidewall. Once you have done this, it can be dumped in the appropriate recycling bin. Jetboil makes a tool to help with this, for which they've made a nice instructional video. To Use: An option to wasting that last 20% is to have an inverted canister setup. Since this relies on gravity instead of boiling ...


4

I would under no circumstances store your white gas stove that way. White gas is pretty volatile stuff and the increased chance of a leak is just not worth it. In addition, why? I am not sure what benefit this would provide. Yes, it is safe to store partially filled white gas canisters. I would not leave them in direct sunlight with hot temperatures ...


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


3

What's the problem? The guy at the airport will take it from you. Proper legal disposal is now his business. There might be a kiosk for dropping items you forgot to leave at home, before dealing with people.


3

If you are not specifically looking for a liquid fuel thing: I always fantasized about making one such thing. But I have never tried. Get a tin Make something that looks like below. Advantages: Tins are easy to find and so are those solid fuel tablets If you break it, worst case you will be at loss of money worth a burger and time worth an afternoon ...


3

Most things I can think of would stop it working even when full. My one suggestion is, is the pump below the fuel line when on its side? The fuel line is the white tube in the picture. If it is in the middle of the bottle and the fuel is low it might not be submerged when the bottle is horizontal. Have you tried putting the bottle vertically or rotating ...


3

This (Jetboil Crunchit Recycling Tool) was found by googling "crush isobutane fuel can" and reading this second result (right below the outoors.SE question) for the link.


2

Cheaper and easier solution. Attach your stove thingy (In my case, a pocket rocket). Open all the way and invert the can (away from flame sources obviously). Use a cheap and old fashioned church key to puncture the side. Total cost, approx. $0.50.


2

The original Penny Stove has been popular for over a decade as a DIY alcohol stove designed for ultralight backpackers. Its trademark is the use of a penny as a fuel regulator. Independent tests document that it heats faster, uses less fuel, simmers longer, and packs lighter than any commercial alcohol stove. The 2.0 version achieves the same ...


2

Rather than the type of fuel - any stove designed to run a fuel will run it with little maintenance, but the quality is important. I had to strip and clean my cooker, that had never had a problem, daily - at 6000+meters due a batch of bad fuel. Best option for trouble free cookers is Gas (Butane/Propane) - the cannisters are sealed in the factory the fuel ...


1

In general 'lighter' fuels with less additives will mean that the stove needs less cleaning. Most of the reason I've needed to clean a stove is from additives which don't burn properly (particularly when igniting the stove) can can block the nozzle and things. For this reason compressed gas is probably best, followed by white gas, petrol (gasoline) and ...


1

My personal preference is for gasoline (yes, even ethanol added). I've never had to clean any of my stoves since I started using it. Given that the quality is pretty closely monitored and regulated in the US this is an extremely consistent, clean burning, and cheap option. It's also extremely easy to find... It should be noted that the "white gas" available ...



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