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8

In New Zealand most river crossings are not done solo. After being taught how important it is to choose a safe crossing point or choose not to cross, you are taught to link people in the group together and cross as a group (Up to four per group, although specifics of terrain may mean pairs are better). The group is much stronger than the individual, you put ...


8

Yes, you can use an emergency blanket as a substitute for most of a tarp's uses, but as you suspect it's not going to be as durable. The Mylar that they're made of is surprisingly tough and I doubt that it would rip or tear, but I would expect it to develop plenty of very small punctures and begin to lose its aluminum coating (possibly making a glittery ...


7

In simplest terms, as you climb, the air pressure around you decreases and your watch subsequently registers an increase in elevation. However, thunderstorms are often associated with a low-pressure weather system moving in, which will also register on your barometer. This can erroneously be interpreted as an increase in elevation. Similarly, high pressure (...


7

You can in a pinch, but not what it is made for. Won't last very long at all and will make a ton of noise. Get a piece of Tyvek and cut it to size. Cheap, light and durable. Can't beat it.


5

In a nutshell: when the weather goes bad, pressure drops, your perceived altitude increases when the weather clears, pressure rises, your perceived altitude decreases Using a precise topographic map of your hike, re-calibrate your altitude watch whenever possible. (At the start, at a summit, at a crossing,...)


5

A few points on your kit: you can get rid of the folding chair. what is the use of the brewberry flask? the underblanket seems overkill compared to the sleeping bag. your towel is huge your backpack is both heavy and very small, especially if you have to carry food for several days. There is no stove in your kit, I suppose you forgot to add it? Your tree ...


3

I come form a coal mining town, in the mines they call the change rooms the 'dry', because mines can be very wet places and the 'dry' is where you'd dry out your clothes. Before they started putting ventilated lockers in the drys, they used to hang their clothes on hooks under baskets that they'd raise up to the ceiling with a rope and pulley system to where ...


3

I can think of multiple options for solving this problem. Tensionless Hitch i.e. wrap the rope around the beam enough times that it doesn't slip and unwrap to lower. Loop a sling over the beam, connect the ends with a carabiner and then counterbalance the items. Tie one strand of parachute cord to the beam, and then attach the items to that strand with ...


3

How do people cross fast flowing rivers without a dedicated wading staff? I can answer this only for Colorado and California. You find a place where you can cross safely, given your strength and balance. This may mean a significant detour. First, for below timberline: Scout upstream and downstream for a log that has fallen across the stream. You ...


2

I drain mine thoroughly, hang/suspend it with the open end down, and stick an empty paper towel tube stuffed with paper towels into it to keep it open. I've found that if I only use water, and let them air dry promptly, I never have a problem. I only use filtered water in my bladder. If I feel I want to clean them, I use a warm white vinegar water solution ...


2

On the surface this seems like a rather simple question, But imagine if the question was "What should I look for in hunting gun?" Essentially the same question, just a different weapon. I found an article Now: Super Accurate Slingshot(Popular Mechanics Jan 1984) that talks about state of the art 30 years ago. Much like for guns there are entire web sites ...


1

Section 6.1 here shows what you should do. Once movescount is installed, it should just work. If this doesn't work then you may have a technical issue which you will need to take up with Suunto.


1

I've crossed a lot of fast flowing creeks and rivers in the Canadian Rockies, some deeper than my waist. The technique I use, and teach others to use, is to walk facing upstream, and walk sideways, leaning into the flow of water. It ultimately comes down to balance and how sure your footing is, I grew up crossing glacier fed rivers this way, so it was ...


1

take a fish tank pump or air mattress pump and run a plastic tube into the bladder. It circulates air and takes about 30 minutes. For the tube itself, I remove the bit valve off the end and swing it around to get the centrifugal force to get most of the water out--then I use the pump--takes about 5 minutes.


1

Once I was advised not to drink too much, but rather just sips, to get rid of the thirst: a camelback + a drinking tube in your backpack should be handy in this case. Of course, apply with reason: do not get yourself dehydrated! drink a lot before the trek (as advised in other answers), and not only: being well-hydrated in general is good for your health (...



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