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15

I think capacitive gloves are your best bet. Basically, they are gloves with something that allows the screen to close a circuit with your body (your hands) and that makes the screen work. I've provided some links to reviews, but the bottom line is this: at the temperature you're describing (around 0 degrees Celsius) they will probably do the job reasonably ...


13

I would definitely pack the following: GPS receiver - this may be your phone if you're starting out, but a dedicated receiver really does wonders if you're looking at Geocaching often. They're more accurate and don't eat through batteries as quickly. If you are using your phone, packing a cheap spare may be wise depending on where you're going - you don't ...


11

Simply put, a cache is hidden at a particular location, and clues are provided (usually via a website, but any media can work) so that searchers can find it. The usual plan is then to open the cache, take an item from it and replace it with something you have brought, and then note your discovery either on a log in the cache or on the website. Geocoins are ...


11

Read the cache page closely. There may be hints in other places as well as the obvious encrypted hint - the cache description, title, and previous logs may all pose clues that would help you on your search. I tend to try without first but if I'm really stuck I'll read all I can to try and give me a bit more of an idea. Bear in mind that the co-ordinates are ...


10

Be very careful as far as schools are concerned - parents or staff will tend to be rather vigilant with strangers on site (especially primary schools) and I believe without permission it is technically trespassing. Geocaches really shouldn't be placed in such areas without written permission anyway, so for some that have done this you might be ok (though ...


9

I've only been geocaching since June 2010 but only in the last few months did I finally figure out what to look for and my count has soared. Now I'm in the process of placing my first hide. It takes practice. At first, all I did was tag along behind veteran cacher pinkdolphin, my mentor and friend in NC, who has logged almost 10K finds. I could never figure ...


9

Interesting question! Here is an article describing the techniques used by arborists. The article describes a number of different techniques and different pieces of gear. I'll describe one specific method, using cheap gear, that is based on techniques that I've used in rock climbing. Buy: a short length (maybe 20 m) of 9-10 mm static climbing rope a small ...


7

Use an ammunition box - commonly found at Army/Navy surplus stores or on eBay/Craiglist for ~$10 USD, depending on the caliber size of the box. .50 caliber boxes are larger than, say, 30 caliber. Waterproof, cheap, and very durable. Another option is to use Tupperware or something similar if a smaller size is desired. Buy higher-end containers that ...


7

Two suggestions. You can get fingerless gloves that also are mittens. Here's a child version so you can see how they work: Second, you can try to get a touchscreen that works with gloves. For example the Nokia Lumia made quite a big deal out of this at their launch. It makes sense that people in Finland would consider cold weather use for their ...


7

GeoKret is an open alternative to commercial TravelBugs. It is an independent solution, having own site: geokrety.org, where you can log it. It is integrated with OpenCaching portal, but Groundspeak is not willing to integrate them with their site. You can use Chrome plugin called GeoKrety Toolbox. Registering new GeoKret costs you nothing, but you need ...


7

The relevant law is the Gesetz zur Erhaltung des Waldes und zur Förderung der Forstwirtschaft. In § 14 Betreten des Waldes (entering the forest) it says (bolded by me): (1) Das Betreten des Waldes zum Zwecke der Erholung ist gestattet. Das Radfahren, das Fahren mit Krankenfahrstühlen und das Reiten im Walde ist nur auf Straßen und Wegen gestattet. Die ...


7

I don't think estimating is the correct approach to climbing trees. See, from mechanics, the tree branch is a cantilever beam. So comparing branches could be done if stepping only at the base of it, only with one foot. Then there is the variable is the branch live or dried out. Lastly, calculating the strength of a branch would include not only ...


7

I don't want, however, to inform anyone around about that cache - I want to keep it secret only for 'chosen'. Although you don't want to, I'd strongly suggest rethinking this - does it really matter if a few neighbours know, and it stops an embarrassing incident or two when the police are called out? When I placed a cache in a (public) residential area ...


7

All under £3: What about a Spork everyone should have a spork.... Vango eye light £3 bargain Vango mug


6

What I have always used is to have the magnet epoxied to the inside of the container. Benefits: There is never a force pulling the magnet away from the container There is no weathering of epoxy No holes required


6

First, pick the location you think it closest to the mark, based on the GPS. Then, walk in an outward spiral, looking at any place that someone would be likely to hide a geocache. Think like a person who is hiding it. Where would you put it? Don't forget to look up. Maybe it's at eye level or above. If you wander around randomly, you'll end up walking over ...


6

A travel bug (or trackable) has a alphanumeric code that can be entered on the geocaching.com website to track its progress as it moves from cache to cache. You can purchase and enter your own codes or just help move someone else's along. When you find one you enter the code at the website and leave a short note about where you found it or future plans. At ...


6

At my local army shop they sell neoprene gloves with detachable finger ends for the index and middle finger ends. Something like the picture below, but without the thumb, and the ends are not cut out but foldable. I have ones without this feature. They are not too warm (good maybe down to -5C), but are very comfortable - I cant type and call on the phone ...


6

I know it might sound crazy, but (if you don't have those capacitive gloves) you can always touch screen with your nose ;) worked for me just fine this winter.


6

I'm lucky to come from the UK where this isn't really an issue (though we still have adders, so sometimes I'm a bit wary.) Having said that, I'll generally still take the following precautions to avoid being bitten, even if it's not life threatening (red ant bytes can still be bloody annoying for instance, and there's lots of those!) Use a torch. I always ...


5

The trackable is the object which can be moved from cache to cache and tracked with help of tracking code. This is something like normal exchange object, but you can track it and know who have taken it and where have it landed. There are only other rules for trackables as for exchange objects - you can't trade trackable for normal exchange object, but you ...


5

The list you've provided as the answer to your question is very good, so I write only about additional items: gloves - very usefull to get caches out of the dirty locations and holes you don't know what is inside (to prevent bites, hurting yourself by splitted glass etc.) string bags - to wrap the logbook, if it is wet or the original wrapping is in poor ...


5

In cities, an issue with geocaching is the accuracy of the GPS - you need to assume a greater margin for error than when you are in the open countryside as tall buildings do affect the signal. As @xpda says, some sort of regular search pattern may be required, and be aware that geocaches may be hidden out of reach of average passers-by to avoid them being ...


5

I have heard from others (and seen in various caches) that a good glue-work is sufficient. I believe that two-part epoxy will be good enough, but I'm not 100% sure. It really depends on the plastic of your container is made of, some glues work better on some types of plastic; some on others. I hope someone else can provide some more solid info. If you know ...


5

I often find a "soft" pencil, say 2B does the job much better than HB. Don't go too soft because then it'll be easy to turn into a smudgy mess, but as a general rule I find a pencil a bit softer than the norm works rather well. Alternatively, if you prefer pen then breathing on a Biro to warm it before writing can often help get it going much more easily, ...


5

In short, it's a high-tech treasure hunt. geocaching.com contains listings for "geocaches" all over the world; containers that are hidden at particular co-ordinates (discoverable via GPS) and often with clues once you get to the rough location. You download the co-ords / clues onto your GPS, go to the spot, look for them and then sign a log in the cache ...


5

This depends on what sort of cache it is, and how big it is. I presume it is some sort of 'micro' or 'nano' cache. One popular type for these is a screwtop magnetic container, eg Nano Cache Container. These are only about 1cm diameter and height, and often silver or black. So if stuck onto something metal, it can be hardly noticeable. It might just look ...


5

I'd say the following are important things to have: Good signal strength is a must - Geocaching will often take you into built up areas or wooded areas, and it's incredibly frustrating going round in circles with an inaccurate GPS when one with a better signal strength could home in on it with no problem at all. Good battery life, preferably with standard ...


5

button compass pencil sharpener magnifying glass (updates when I think of some more)


4

This is highly subjective, but I'll give it a shot. Let's take a site of local significance, like a statue or memorial. All in all, only one cache is "needed" to "cover" this area. More caches will just be for people wanting to: A) Find more caches for the sake of the numbers, B) Hide more caches for the sake of numbers. Of course, this is not a "wrong" way ...



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