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20

If you're not using the device to find your way, it is useless as far as the GPS functionality is concerned, no matter whether it's switched on or off. If I know they are looking for me, would they pick up the signal, if I switch it on for short periods every now and again? What signal? The GPS signal is sent by satellites, GPS devices receive this ...


16

I'd give them whatever my device or map provided me, and let them convert to whatever their devices or maps use. Anyone used to receiving lat/lon coordinates regularly should be able to convert from various formats to whatever they use internally. You're the one in trouble with limited resources. You're out there with a broken leg, lost, in the cold or ...


12

I think you already answered your own question. Most dedicated GPS devices are more rugged, have better battery life, and don't require a data connection to work well. A phone has a lot of power overhead and is fragile. There are a few possible advantages to a phone. If you're already going to be carrying one, it reduces the total weight required. It's ...


10

Most GPS receivers in phones work not nearly as good as stand-alone GPS devices. Usually, one wouldn't notice this because phones use assisted GPS where they get the orbital data and/or almanac of the GPS satellites as well as the exact time from the GSM network. Also, they have a average position of the device. Without that data, phones are very slow ...


10

GPS is simply not a good way to measure trail distance. This is because the raw GPS fixes have a lot of noise on them. If you take them literally, then you get a much longer distance than you actually moved. If you low pass filter them too much, you cut off corners and get a shorter distance. The usual algorithm is to apply some low pass filtering, but ...


9

Use the GPS to determine your position and then text or email that to your rescuers. That will be the end of the GPS's contribution to the rescue process. Staying put is generally best (saves your energy and ensures you don't move into an area they have searched and think you are not in) but that place should be safe and you should be discoverable in it. ...


8

I would consider using OSM as they are available for garmin devices.


8

There are two main things that can go wrong with gps accuracy. The first is the quality of the signal, which can be less than for a dedicated gps unit (less space for an antenna and other design compromises). Of course the question of how you carry it comes into play here (a low pocket isn't very good and this may be worse than with a dedicated unit ...


7

According to everything I have found on the web and experienced with my own watch, the watch will not register as mass storage so that you could access the recorded logs directly. Therefore you cannot just plug the watch to a random computer and copy he logs like it was a USB thumb drive. But, there's at least some help: Computers running on Windows or ...


7

GPS (wikipedia) is based on orbiting satellites and so is accurate worldwide. There are other similar systems in use or under development, run by other countries (Russia, China, India, and the EU), but the US GPS still works everywhere. This stick shadow method should work the same north and south of the equator. The constellation you should look for down ...


7

I would recommend UTM coordinates; it avoids the formatting uncertainty of lat/long and is better suited for ground operations. (Easy to translate to paper maps, define search areas, and calculate distances.) If you use the WGS84 datum, the numerical portions are also identical with the military grid reference system (MGRS) and the national grid (USNG). ...


6

I can't help you with exact configurations. But as usual this kind of thing has a basic rule. The less it's activated, the less it will use it's battery. Standby mode (time it spends counting the seconds to next use) will use almost no power at all. As soon as it comes to life it will aquire a GPS signal, Triangulate it's position and send it to a server ...


6

GPS systems can, and do, work everywhere you can get satellites. The coordinate system -- or datum -- you choose to use should vary (even in the US) depending on the maps you are working with, your project needs, the area you are working in, or what the legacy system you are dealing with... In the history of map-making, a ton of different projections and ...


6

Disclaimer: I rarely use GPS system personally so feel free to correct me if I've misunderstood something. However, I think that 2000 points should be more than enough. Say you are doing a reasonably long route of 40km per day. If you use all 2000 points in that distance that will give you one point every 20m. Give that the accuracy of your GPS under some ...


5

If you really do need exceptional accuracy, you could use the solution many Ingress players use - a good Android phone with a battery pack. In the game you often need accuracy of 2 or 3 metres - so the Galaxy S3 or a phone paired with the Nexus 7 (which has an excellend GPS) are the tools of choice. The game uses google maps and wireless navigation, as well ...


5

I live in Sweden and I hike a lot in the wild. My personal top three properties to look for in a handheld GPS receiver for The Great Outdoors: Battery life Battery life Battery life I honestly don't care if the measurement is 20 metre off. In the Swedish mountains, it usually isn't, there are no deep canyons, and if there are you can only go in one ...


5

I'd say the following are important things to have: Good signal strength is a must - Geocaching will often take you into built up areas or wooded areas, and it's incredibly frustrating going round in circles with an inaccurate GPS when one with a better signal strength could home in on it with no problem at all. Good battery life, preferably with standard ...


5

I use Timble GPS Hunt Pro on my Samsung Galaxy S5 phone. You can download topo, BLM boundaries, private property and other types of maps that work just fine without a cell signal. The maps I use are incredibly detailed. If you do have cell coverage, you can add weather overlays. Map prices are reasonable, and you can buy a subscription that lets you ...


5

We have an article about this topic, since Gaia GPS users frequently ask - why GPS recording can be inaccurate. The short answer is, as others have said, GPS isn't perfectly accurate. If you compare a GPS measurement to a measurement from a measuring wheel, there will be a discrepancy in stat calculations, regardless of GPS chip or post-processing ...


4

The easiest option is to use this website: Garmin.Openstreetmap.nl It has an option to select just the map tiles you want, so you can get a map for a fairly small area if you want. To do this, choose the option for "Enable manual tile selection", then click on the tiles to select them. Then enter your email address, and click the button for "Build my map". ...


4

On mobile devices, the Gaia GPS app allows creating a waypoint using whichever format is currently selected (which includes UTM). From your computer, you can enter UTM coordinates into CalTopo; this is convenient if you are printing out paper maps. (It also has some ability to annotate maps and save them to KMZ/KML files for use with Google Earth or your ...


4

There are many devices that will let you enter in UTM and LatLong coordinates interchangeably. be sure to bring a waterproof map with you too though. http://www.rei.com/product/869473/garmin-gpsmap-64-gps http://www.magellangps.com/Store/eXploristSeries/eXplorist-510


4

Very rough rule of thumb is that effort distance (ED) is horizontal distance (HD) + 5 * Vertical distance (VD) So ED = HD + VD example: A recent hike I took had a horizontal distance of 85 miles, and a vertical distance (up and down) of 25,000 feet. The effort distance ED = 85 + 125000/5280 or 110 miles. In practice I've found that there is a critical ...


4

I just bought the 310xt, because it stores a lot of data (does everything you want, but doesn't have a barometric altimeter, just gps altitude). I am very happy with it. Because it is slightly older, the price is very reasonable. Many more expensive watches are a bit smaller, but they have a battery that lasts only 8h when new, the 310xt has ample reserve. ...


4

For your situation I strongly advice against relying on your phone. It's a great backup but to much of a risk to use as a main device. Three reasons to get a dedicated gps: Batteries: A gps mostly works on standard AA batteries which can be bought anywhere and rechargeable ones are easily charged on solar energy. (look up goal-zero for instance). Rugged:...


4

Let's go through the different aspects of phone versus dedicated GPS device point by point (however, quite surely without being complete). Basically you have to decide which points apply in your situation and how you weigh them. GPS reception and accuracy When the first smartphones with GPS units hit the market, there was the saying that their GPS ...


3

You could try the global multi-layer GPS game from Google: Ingress You need to be able to navigate to locations (generally monuments, statues, major landmarks etc) and once there you claim them for your faction (or destroy the mods placed there by the opposing players) - and to handle higher level missions you need to be able to meet up with other players ...


3

For compasses, it will depend on the model. You can get globally balanced compasses like the Suunto M3 Global, but Silva compasses (probably the most common in Europe) tend to be balanced for the Northern Hemisphere. As LBell says, they'll point the right way, but just won't work smoothly so you run the risk of taking inaccurate bearings. It's worth ...


3

I have the Garmin Etrex 20 and I use it for everything from geocaching, to wilderness and kayaking navigation. Obviously this answer is just based on my personal experience with the device, I can't speak for anybody else. Loading, displaying, and entering in new caches or locations doesn't take very long at all. After I learned where all the menus and sub-...


3

Interesting question... It would be hard to really quantify something like this because it will be different for each person. Sure walking up a steep hill is always challenging, but some people are much better at it (but might struggle with steep downhill walks?). Determining your Pace Index (how fast in MPH or KPH you walk), using your travel hiking ...



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