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21

Hammocks are cold. The weight of your body compresses the clothes or sleeping bag, and air circulates underneath you, as opposed to a tent where you usually have a pad and the ground for insulation. It seems like it would be tough to stay dry in the rain in a hammock. It's nice to have a tent to get into in the rain in between hiking/playing and sleeping if ...


15

Being in a hammock shouldn't change anything. A tent is not any safer, and may be more dangerous, since you don't have visibility of the area around you. Buy or borrow a copy of Trail Life, there's a good discussion of the issues with using a tent. A tarp is my preference over a hammock or a tent, because they make for a dryer and more comfortable night's ...


15

I've been a hammock backpacker for about three and a half years now. I love it. There's not a better way to backpack in the summer in my opinion. But despite numerous advantages to hammocking, there are some downsides (tradeoffs): The biggest potential downside, as others have mentioned, is heat loss from the underside of the hammock, something my ...


14

There is another post in which my answer deals with this question among other things. I have not yet met anyone that has tried to sleep with two people in a hammock that still practices it. I have tried it, and while it's ok for a short nap or just relaxing, for overnight and/or multiple nights it's just not comfortable or practical. I have owned two ENO ...


12

You don't have to spend a lot to enjoy the benefits of hammock camping. It sounds like you already know the jargon and have probably seen some great hammock kits out there (e.g., Warbonnet, Hennessy, etc.). These kits are great because, generally speaking, they have all the major components (rain protection, bug protection, hammock body) combined into a ...


11

My experience comes mostly from backpacking in remote areas without already made tent sites. I have found that a hammock is better for me and my style of camping. If you are mostly a car-camper and are used to pulling your SUV up to a pad site, YMMV. Following are the reasons I believe a Hammock is better than a Tent. Weight - In all but the coldest ...


10

In a lot of places it will be quite difficult finding two trees the right distance apart to hang it. When it's late and you've been walking all day, all you want to do is lie down and rest, you might spend quite a long time looking for those two trees. Here in the UK when it rains, it often comes horizontal, so even with a tarp over you, you're going to get ...


8

Your best bet is to study an Ordance Survey map of the area. Incidently you can get these off Bing which is cool. I'd look for a campsite symbol with some form of forest near by: Preferably deciduous forest, which will have well spaced out trees, forestry commision land tends to be densely packed: The same applies for any wild camping spots. Bear in ...


7

I am an avid hammock camper. I went on a 4 day trip where is rained nearly every afternoon. Besides the obvious benefits (not requiring even ground, sleeping comfortably, etc.), I found that hammock camping had the distinct benefit of not having to climb into a tent for rain protection. I was able to simple walk under the tarp and sit in my hammock. That's ...


5

Hammock Can you lie flat in it? How large/heavy is it? Footbox? Color (stealth camping?) Suspension How easy is it to adjust? Can you adjust your hammock to different sags? Do you always want to have the same amount of sag? What is the furthest distance between trees that your suspension can accommodate? This will depend on How much stretch ...


5

This is not personal experience, but I'll share anyway. I was really into hammocking a few years back and found a guy on one of the message boards who was VERY enthusiastic about sharing a hammock with his girlfriend. He had built a hammock he was very satisfied with, but it had a spreader across the top, which I assume kept their top halves from smooshing ...


5

Hammocks are great for hot weather. I have backpacked with a hammock in the Virginia summer, when the nights were 85°F-95°. There are certainly enough trees here, and in any densely forested area. It is actually preferable (with a mosquito net) because you stay cooler. When it rained, I slept on the ground with a small rain fly, because water likes to ...


4

I am relatively new to hammock camping, but the only downside that I am aware of is possibly not being able to find a place to hang. As others have mentioned, you do have to account for heat loss out of the bottom of the hammock, but that can be solved simply/cheaply by putting closed-cell foam pad in the bottom of the hammock (generally more expensive is ...


4

You will likely want to check out http://www.hammockforums.net/ They have a DIY section has tutorials on all sorts of hammock building or hammock accessories.


3

I have found that the forestry commission runs 'private' forests too. We should call them woodlands I suppose. However, to the question. The trees may have been planted methodically in neat lines but some saplings die. I have slept in the woodlands around Macclesfield and found some of the more mature trees to be too far apart, even the pines. I use tree ...


3

Just to add to Liams answer: Plan your trip and search for natural campsites (so don't go for the busy familily and tourist ones). I found they mostly have two parts, one open-ish field and a forest part with 'normal' tree spacing. Since I mostly go car camping I will often hang one side of my hammock of the roof of my jeep thus requiring one less tree. ...


2

I had the same worries as the OP, but a buddy of mine brought a store-bought hammock on a 3 night trip a few years ago. I started investigating and found this site. I made my own for a few bucks (< $20 for the ripstop nylon, a few bucks for some rings, a few more for straps, paracord and a couple carabiners), have used it for 2 years now, and it's still ...


2

Not a hammock camper myself, but I can think of a few: More ventilated in the summer. Lighter to carry - you don't need something to pad the place you're sleeping on and you don't need the same level of rigidness that a tent offers. Usually more environmentally friendly - since they are smaller than tents hammocks leave a shorter toll on the environment ...


2

Perhaps not surprisingly, there's not a lot of information floating around about what happens when you subject gore-tex to this kind of stress. Gore-tex is a porous material, so stretching it might yield unexpected results. Worst case scenario, you set your gore-tex hammock on wet ground and the water slowly seeps through. Then again, if the pores are ...


1

If you want waterproofing available to put under you, I would just bring along a 2 mil thickness of plastic for use as a ground sheet. This will be much lighter and cheaper than the same square-footage of goretex. That thickness will tend to get torn on a long trip, so you may want to bring a little duct tape for use in patching it.


1

I've been using a bear fence lately: Best sleep in bear country. Look it up on Internet. Does add about 3-4lbs to your kit, so get lighter somewhere else.


1

Not a hammock camper (not a camper at all...) I can imagine another advantage that hasn't been named yet: As you are not on the ground you don't have to be afraid of water on the ground. So especially in rainy weather where the soil cannot handle all the water you have to take some measures to secure a tent against getting flooded or washed away. In a ...



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