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5

I've been hammock camping for about four years, and there are a few issues you should be aware of. First, as already noted in the comments under your original question, insulation is critically important. I know that below about 65 F (18 C), I sleep uncomfortably cold. This is because your insulation (sleeping bag) beneath you is compressed by your body ...


5

I own a Grand Trunk Double hammock (10.5' long x 6.5' wide), I'm 5'10" 160 lbs, my wife is 5'4" and not overweight (I'm not writing the # ;) ). Slept 2 nights so far with her in the hammock. We each had our own sleeping bag. We were definitely squished together tightly. We couldn't roll over. That said, we both slept okay. It is definitely less comfortable ...


4

A ridgeline is generally used to suspend a tarp above a hammock. It attaches to the trees at or near the level that the hammock attaches to them, but it is pulled tight so that it is well above the level you will be sleeping at. Some hammocks, such as a Hennessey, have integrated ridgelines. Others, like ENO, do not. In the Hennessey hammocks, the ...


3

There are really only two main considerations for hammock camping: the first is hanging the hammock (trees); the second is whether or not it will be warm enough to sleep in a hammock (temperature). Hammocks are great at keeping you cool, so they are best suited for sleeping in hot humid environments where there are plenty of trees to hang it from, and ...


3

I did it for three nights. First night was more like intermittent napping, but my girlfriend slept great. The second night I woke up twice. The third night I was more concerned with the flapping sound from my rain fly, the creaking trees and the sideways wind. After minimizing the flapping sound I slept as fine as I would have in those conditions on my own. ...


3

You might try stretching out your hammock tighter between trees and sleeping slightly diagonally to keep the hammock from compressing the sides of your sleeping bag as much. If you're able to sleep on your side it should reduce the amount of insulation being compressed as well.


2

The ridge line goes from one tie-out point to the other directly above where the user lies down. Some hammocks may not have any ridge line or may have a non-structural ridge line as explained on this site. In my experience, a tent setup (e.g. cuben fiber tent) will usually be lighter than a hammock setup for the same temperature setup. Particularly in ...


2

You may want to try an under quilt. There are multiple cottage industries that produce under quilts. The great thing is the loft doesn't get compressed because it hangs under the hammock. EDIT: Try adding an emergency blanket lining the underquilt. It's super light weight and reflects the warmth and radiates back into the hammock. It works super great!


1

There a few possible remedies to your cold sleeping woes. You already have most of the appropriate equipment so these are some of my suggestions: For general coolness, first I'd recommend some type of vapor barrier/shield on the outside of your underquilt to block the air movement in your insulation, which is the single biggest cooling factor. This could be ...


1

I couldn't find an authoritative reference to state that a snake wouldn't do that. The main climbing snake in Texas is the Rat Snake. While one of those could climb into your hammock to cuddle, I doubt they would. At the end of the day it is much easier for a snake to slither into a sleeping bag/tent/boot/etc. than a hammock. Those items are all on the ...


1

My husband and I backpacked around Europe for 3 months, sleeping in a hammock almost the entire time. At first we slept side by side with our heads on the same end. It was horrible. So we switched to having our heads on opposite ends, with each person slanted, forming a tight X. It was comfortable, and we are planning on exchanging our bed for a hammock.


1

I've slept a few nights in a double hammock with my girlfriend, and it definitely works well- but you have to take into account your normal sleeping habits in a bed. We tend to sleep spooning, which is very easy to accomplish in a hammock. We have an ENO double nest, and I'd say the biggest problem we've encountered is just difficulty with bedding, which ...



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