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12

It depends largely on the hammock size and personal preference. My friend's hammock has mesh gear pockets on the underside for storage, but he doesn't mind sleeping with the boots on or inside the hammock. The backpack can pose a bigger issue, because there usually isn't enough room with it filled up. If you empty it out and it compresses easily, give ...


7

The strength is dependent mainly on the angle between the two ropes form, on which the hammock is hung, and the weight you want the hammock to support. For a traditional hammock the angles of the ropes (measured to the horizontal) are about A=30° (just an estimate). Lets assume we want to design the system for a person weighing W=200lbs. Then we can derive ...


5

Having been in the same situation and tried various scenarios, I've found the best way for hanging my boots is to keep a carabiner with me. I hook it on the loops on the back of my boots and hang that from the straps that I'm using to suspend my hammock. Depending on the weather I also do the same thing with my pack. The straps I use have loops in them. If ...


5

How about if you hang the hammock so that there is 3' of space below it, then run a "clothesline" below it? then hang the boots and pack of the line. As long as they are below the hammock they shouldn't get wet. And I'd think it's fine to have the outside touching the ground.


5

I'm not sure how your setup is, but I'd try a Purcell prussik or something similar. Animated example You must test its holding Power on paracord yourself, but on climbing cord it's solid enough.


5

I've recently got into hammock camping and roping it to a tree is a bit more complicated than it first sounds so please bear with me You need something to wrap around the tree to protect it from holding your weight, these are unsurprisingly called tree straps - mine are made out of seat belt material. You need something adjustable from the tree straps to ...


5

A ridgeline is generally used to suspend a tarp above a hammock. It attaches to the trees at or near the level that the hammock attaches to them, but it is pulled tight so that it is well above the level you will be sleeping at. Some hammocks, such as a Hennessey, have integrated ridgelines. Others, like ENO, do not. In the Hennessey hammocks, the ...


3

You might try stretching out your hammock tighter between trees and sleeping slightly diagonally to keep the hammock from compressing the sides of your sleeping bag as much. If you're able to sleep on your side it should reduce the amount of insulation being compressed as well.


3

The ridge line goes from one tie-out point to the other directly above where the user lies down. Some hammocks may not have any ridge line or may have a non-structural ridge line as explained on this site. In my experience, a tent setup (e.g. cuben fiber tent) will usually be lighter than a hammock setup for the same temperature setup. Particularly in ...


2

You may want to try an under quilt. There are multiple cottage industries that produce under quilts. The great thing is the loft doesn't get compressed because it hangs under the hammock. EDIT: Try adding an emergency blanket lining the underquilt. It's super light weight and reflects the warmth and radiates back into the hammock. It works super great!


2

The type of knot you are looking for a called a friction hitch, or a slide and grip knot which is a kind of knot used to attach one rope to another in a way that is easily adjusted. There are many different ways to tie a friction hitch: Klemheist Blake's Hitch Distel Hitch Rolling Hitch Prussic Bachmann Hitch Autoblock Hitch And of course the Purcell ...


2

I know it's fashionable to store as much stuff as you can in your hammock and hang it underneath, but there are plenty of good reasons not to, most of which depend on your environment and sleeping preferences. In swamps and jungles, for instance, there are a lot of creeping and crawling things that like to attach themselves to spaces that...I don't know, ...


2

I use two short lengths of rope, each with loops tied at both end. Put a rope around the tree and pass one end through the loop (so you have a slip knot on the tree, one end of the rope with a loop will be free). Repeat on other tree. This is very adjustable to any size of tree that is sturdy enough to support you, and you can wrap it around more than once ...


2

I couldn't find an authoritative reference to state that a snake wouldn't do that. The main climbing snake in Texas is the Rat Snake. While one of those could climb into your hammock to cuddle, I doubt they would. At the end of the day it is much easier for a snake to slither into a sleeping bag/tent/boot/etc. than a hammock. Those items are all on the ...


2

A ridgeline defines the amount of sag a gathered-end hammock has. If there is no ridgeline, the fabric carries all the tension from the anchor points and is more taut. With a ridgeline, the fabric is much looser, facilitating a diagonal lay. It also keeps an integrated mosquito net away from your body. Plus it's a handy place to hang stuff like your ...


1

There a few possible remedies to your cold sleeping woes. You already have most of the appropriate equipment so these are some of my suggestions: For general coolness, first I'd recommend some type of vapor barrier/shield on the outside of your underquilt to block the air movement in your insulation, which is the single biggest cooling factor. This could be ...


1

My husband and I backpacked around Europe for 3 months, sleeping in a hammock almost the entire time. At first we slept side by side with our heads on the same end. It was horrible. So we switched to having our heads on opposite ends, with each person slanted, forming a tight X. It was comfortable, and we are planning on exchanging our bed for a hammock.



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