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8

Your best bet is to study an Ordance Survey map of the area. Incidently you can get these off Bing which is cool. I'd look for a campsite symbol with some form of forest near by: Preferably deciduous forest, which will have well spaced out trees, forestry commision land tends to be densely packed: The same applies for any wild camping spots. Bear in ...


6

Hammock Can you lie flat in it? How large/heavy is it? Footbox? Color (stealth camping?) Suspension How easy is it to adjust? Can you adjust your hammock to different sags? Do you always want to have the same amount of sag? What is the furthest distance between trees that your suspension can accommodate? This will depend on How much stretch ...


3

My experience with hammocks: serveral multi-day bike trips. Downsides: You need trees. Depending on the area this can be a problem. I have found myself looking desperately for trees in Hungary. On the other hand you may find spots to tie your hammock in strange places (abbandoned customs station, bridge) The rain can be an issue, but that what your tarp ...


3

I have found that the forestry commission runs 'private' forests too. We should call them woodlands I suppose. However, to the question. The trees may have been planted methodically in neat lines but some saplings die. I have slept in the woodlands around Macclesfield and found some of the more mature trees to be too far apart, even the pines. I use tree ...


3

Just to add to Liams answer: Plan your trip and search for natural campsites (so don't go for the busy familily and tourist ones). I found they mostly have two parts, one open-ish field and a forest part with 'normal' tree spacing. Since I mostly go car camping I will often hang one side of my hammock of the roof of my jeep thus requiring one less tree. ...


2

Perhaps not surprisingly, there's not a lot of information floating around about what happens when you subject gore-tex to this kind of stress. Gore-tex is a porous material, so stretching it might yield unexpected results. Worst case scenario, you set your gore-tex hammock on wet ground and the water slowly seeps through. Then again, if the pores are ...


1

If you want waterproofing available to put under you, I would just bring along a 2 mil thickness of plastic for use as a ground sheet. This will be much lighter and cheaper than the same square-footage of goretex. That thickness will tend to get torn on a long trip, so you may want to bring a little duct tape for use in patching it.


1

I've been using a bear fence lately: Best sleep in bear country. Look it up on Internet. Does add about 3-4lbs to your kit, so get lighter somewhere else.



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