Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Being in a hammock shouldn't change anything. A tent is not any safer, and may be more dangerous, since you don't have visibility of the area around you. Buy or borrow a copy of Trail Life, there's a good discussion of the issues with using a tent. A tarp is my preference over a hammock or a tent, because they make for a dryer and more comfortable night's ...


11

My experience comes mostly from backpacking in remote areas without already made tent sites. I have found that a hammock is better for me and my style of camping. If you are mostly a car-camper and are used to pulling your SUV up to a pad site, YMMV. Following are the reasons I believe a Hammock is better than a Tent. Weight - In all but the coldest ...


3

Your best bet is to study an Ordance Survey map of the area. Incidently you can get these off Bing which is cool. I'd look for a campsite symbol with some form of forest near by: Preferably deciduous forest, which will have well spaced out trees, forestry commision land tends to be densely packed: The same applies for any wild camping spots. Bear in ...


2

Perhaps not surprisingly, there's not a lot of information floating around about what happens when you subject gore-tex to this kind of stress. Gore-tex is a porous material, so stretching it might yield unexpected results. Worst case scenario, you set your gore-tex hammock on wet ground and the water slowly seeps through. Then again, if the pores are ...


1

If you want waterproofing available to put under you, I would just bring along a 2 mil thickness of plastic for use as a ground sheet. This will be much lighter and cheaper than the same square-footage of goretex. That thickness will tend to get torn on a long trip, so you may want to bring a little duct tape for use in patching it.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible