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13

Seawater is not itself sterile, in fact, it has all kinds of organisms. Salt in a wound is likely to hurt, and saltwater won't be a particularly effective antiseptic. With wound cleaning, it's always a question of trade-offs. It might be better to use less-than-sterile water to clean an extremely dirty wound if infection is otherwise inevitable. However, ...


11

I'll be sticking to the "Descend and the Knee pain" part of the discussion here. Yeah, there is no doubt that a descend definitely make a knee-pain worst. (I am strictly sticking to the point that its not caused solely by descending the mountain). The intensity can vary person to person and that is depending upon habits one has developed over the time. ...


10

Been there, done that, can't remember why it happened.. It will go away in a few days. Eating few apples, or maybe some dry, high-fiber crackers will probably help.


10

Have you ever done any weight training? This kind of "delayed onset muscle soreness" is very common for people beginning a weight training program. This wikipedia page attempts to explain the mechanism. For weight training, the general advice is to not stop lifting, but to reduce the weight and intensity. If you google "delay onset muscle soreness" ...


7

You can use different methods to remove the pine sap from your teeth. Here are a few: Take a small amount of margarine and rub on the sap Mix a solution of warm water, salt, and about 3 drops of honey, keep this mixture in your mouth for about 3minutes use some drinkable strong alcohol and try to rub it of use oil or peanut butter and rub it over the sap ...


7

Poisonous plants are typically more dangerous when you burn them, at least that's true with plants that have oily toxins (poison ivy/oak). Toxins in plants aren't necessarily vaporized when burned. Smoke is a particulate, not a vapour. If you are burning something toxic, the toxins can potentially be carried by particles of smoke and be inhaled which is far ...


7

No, seawater cannot be considered antiseptic. At minimum, Staphylococcus, which is the cause of many serious infections and deaths every year, and one agent of necrotizing fasciitis, is "able to survive: ... High levels of salt" and may even be spread by seawater. I recall reading (but am presently unable to cite) that parasites such as Cryptosporidium ...


6

According to this health-related website, you should still wear a shirt: You should not think of sunscreen as an alternative to avoiding the sun or covering up. It is used in addition. Sunscreens should not be used to allow you to remain in the sun for longer - use them only to give yourself greater protection. No sunscreen is 100% effective and so it ...


6

At least for some species, Rhododendron wood is not especially toxic when burned. I've seen (and used) many species of Rhododendron in the Chinese Himalaya as firewood, in both outdoor and drafty indoor conditions. This included seasoned and unseasoned wood, and large enough quantities of smoke that my Rite-in-The-Rain notebooks still smell like bacon. ...


6

I would say it is likely you can have issues with your knees when you get older as a mountaineer - in the same way someone who regularly runs on the roads can get damaged knees, in this case it is recommended to run on grass (as it's obviously more cushioned) or on uneven ground such as in a forest, which is usually a mix of leaf litter and harder ground - ...


5

In addition to the suggestions above, regular use of walking or trekking poles are a great help in alleviating knee and hip problems.


5

I've been a martial artist for over 30 years in a style which puts a lot of strain on your knees, as well as regular cyclist, occasional skier, hiker and ice-skater. I damaged a knee cartilage and tendons over 20 years ago and have to be careful and have particularly noticed problems hiking. One thing which has helped a lot is long-term consumption of ...


5

I have to disagree with the above answer about rotator cuff problems. It is a good idea to strengthen your rotator cuffs for various reasons, but to me this does just sound like Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. Any type of high intensity exercise where you put strain on your muscles is likely to cause the same thing. I get delayed soreness (which always seems ...


4

Assuming you're reapplying the screen often (sweat washes it away) and it's a quality one, then it would do for what matters sun protection (although you should still properly cover your head with a hat or a bandana or whatever). That being said, I would use a shirt anyways; to protect your skin from the abrasion of the rucksack, to absorb some sweat, and ...


3

Coming from an "enjoying nature" perspective, the equation becomes more simple in my estimation. If the trail can be expected to be reasonably well packed down, boots are perfect, traction cleats can be slipped onto boots if the hike is especially steep or slick. If the trail is expected to be deep powder, not hard pack snow.. snow shoes are easily the best ...


3

There's a strap called Cho Pat that my dr. told me about -- it helps immensely.


3

Plantar fasciitis is a degenerative (not inflammatory) repetitive stress injury (RSI). Studies using radioactive tracers have shown that the rate of tissue replacement in connective tissues is often extremely slow, maybe even zero. Therefore these injuries can be extremely slow to heal, and in some cases the microscopic damage is simply permanent. So you ...


3

This sounds to me what we would call in the UK prickly heat. What causes prickly heat? Prickly heat usually develops when a person sweats more than usual, such as during hot or humid weather. However, it is also possible to get prickly heat in the winter. The condition is caused when the body's sweat glands become blocked. Excessive sweating ...


3

That sounds like a rotator cuff problem to me. It's a common problem that I see amongst my climbing friends and I experience myself. Usual symptoms are soreness in the elbow join/lower bicep, sometimes causing carpal tunnel pain, sometimes causing more extreme shoulder pain, sometimes even limiting movement. My understanding is that we overuse the big ...


2

Heat rashes are caused by excessive heat trapped under the skin. As you specifically referred to ankles and shins, I'd suggest you considering using shorts instead of full pants, only if those tiny red rash-bums have not burst. If those are already burst then you should be going to a doctor in order to avoid any infection. Try to avoid clothing with ...


2

If you are a person who burns readily then sunblock at all times plus long sleeve shirt and hat are your only answer. However the danger of sun, IMHO is overrated, compared to the other hazards of life. At one point I used the World Almanac for figures: Fatal skin cancers kill about 2 people per hundred thousand per year. So skin cancer has about the ...


2

As Paul says, think of sunscreen as in addition to other protection methods. So while you can go without a shirt, it's ideal to also wear a shirt and use other protection methods like a hat. As for whether clothing is always better, that in large part depends on the clothing. Some clothing provides good sun protection while others (think shirts with ...


2

You can reduce or avoid knee pain by knowing how to descend properly. The correct way to hike downhill is not to move your front foot forward and simultaneously load it with your weight at the same time, as most people do. That way, the force generated by your weight (which increases while moving down thanks to the acceleration generated by the movement ...


2

I'm a sailboat skipper with 25 years experience, so perhaps my tips could help a bit. Since the skipper is responsible for the safety and well-being of his/her crew, he or she also has a responsibility to avoid when possible situations which will make members of his crew seasick. For the crew: If you are susceptible to seasickness, consider starting to ...


2

In my opinion the major risk wearing no snowshoes on deep snow (besides the time aspect) is that you step close in front of a stone or other obstacle. You don't have to run, it is just normal that your leg benches and it is likely that your shin gets levered against that obstacle. That leverage increases the force on your shin and maybe the ankle which might ...


2

I make my own laundry soap. I just found out that fels naptha soap found at walmart in the laundry isle is the best to use for the oils left on material items. Try it it works great and i save tons of money. Just grate the soap and mix with borax and washing powder. If you like you can also put in crystals. I use purex. 2 tsp in the wash cycle and WOW!


2

Your body needs a certain amount of salt (electrolytes) to process water (and also for many other bodily functions). If you don't have enough electrolytes then your body's use of water is not optimal. A typical American diet gives you enough electrolytes so that you actually do not need to do anything special to make sure you are consuming enough. If you are ...


2

I just got back from hiking Inyo county Bishop Ca. area call Sage flat and when coming down my outside knees began to hurt and by the time we got down it was hard to take steps. I hoped over night it would feel better so i could hike the next day, It did and we decided to take the lower trail which is flatter but again coming back i started to feel my knee ...


2

This is what I've found in the wonderful world of the internets: http://www.buildablock.com/blog/poisonous-plants-to-avoid-in-north-america Personal experience living in the USA for 22 years says that there are more issues with thorn bushes than with stinging nettles. Most poisonous plants I've run into are low to the ground. If you wear pants (and are not ...


1

Seawater, no. But clean salt water, yes. Salt-water solution should be isotonic, i.e. same salt level as your body; ca ΒΌ teaspoon of sea-salt to 250 ml water. I used it on my nose piercing and it was very effective. :)



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