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3

This sounds like exercise induced Vasculitis. This is tiny blood vessels which break due to heat & restriction due to socks & friction. Also known as a golfers rash. It tends to happen more in people over 50. It has nothing to do with being overweight either as someone commented on the web. Mine was as a result of hiking a minimum of 25km per ...


2

My parents have routinely used old flasks for many years with no ill effects. As the flask is metal / glass both of which can be sterilised I expect it would be fine to use. I recommend you check the seal in the lid which keeps it watertight. If this is rubber it is likely to be degraded and could leak and, as rubber is porous, is a potential hiding place ...


-1

While the following won't absolutely prevent it, it will help: Set up a hand washing station in camp. The easiest one of these is a perforated ladle made from a pop bottle. Size the holes so that it runs water for 10-15 seconds. Provide a foam soap dispenser that has an anti-viral in it. Have a dedicated bucket. The station is set up on a tree near the ...


2

Numbers: You are asking the right questions. From 30 years of running about 4 weeks of trips annually: About 1 trip in 5 we would have an 'epidemic' of upset stomach and loose bowels. Usually this was attributed to poor dish washing. Adding a hotwater/bleach cycle to the daily routine eliminated the problem within 2-3 days. "Cup borrowing" was a ...


0

An epi-pen buys you 15 to 30 minutes. You can follow up with benadryl for other antihistamine. But the patient needs to understand what to do. For a back country activity the patient needs sufficient antihistamine to get over the incident or back to medical facility. This is a serious incident. I have worked with people who were seriously allergic to ...


0

Although an epi-pen-like device is the correct treatment for anaphylaxis, if the patient's airway is becoming obstructed, and adrenaline is not available (or has already been expended), several puffs (some sources say 8-10) from an asthma inhaler intended for treating an acute asthma attack, particularly one containing salbutamol (also known as albuterol), ...


36

Anybody who has severe allergies which could lead to anaphylaxic shock should carry appropriate medication with them. Typically, that would consist of: An antihistamine (e.g. benadryll) An epinephrine auto-injector (aka "Epi-Pen") Benadryll is available over the counter and you should have it in your first aid kit. Epi is by prescription only (at least ...


-2

My personal experience as a female, with a lifetime of low blood pressure. I have not done much high altitude trekking. Two times in recent memory, as an adult, and both times I noticed significant peripheral edema in hands and feet as I descended. I ascended 3000 feet the first time (that's feet, not metres, so not very high at all), and 2500 feet the ...


5

The best strategy is to probably hike an alternate hike. Instead of the traditional NOBO GAME route with a start date at the end of March, you could go SOBO, or do a flip flop, or start early or late. By avoiding the crowds, you reduce your risks. You can also avoid shelters and hostels. Good hygiene, plenty of rest, and a proper diet are also useful for ...


4

Acquire it 6 months or less before your trip on the AT. There is some controversy but it seems you can probably count on immunity from an exposure to last 6+ months. Some of the best places to acquirer Norovirus (that are easily accessible) are daycare centers and nursing homes. Volunteering at one or more of these institutions, is win/win you get to ...


7

TL;DR It's very difficult if not impossible. Norovirus is very, very contagious. It can be spread: close contact with someone with norovirus – they may breathe out small particles containing the virus that you could inhale touching contaminated surfaces or objects – the virus can survive outside the body for several days eating ...


4

In the civilized world you wash your hands regularly, and food handlers should so and additionally wear gloves so if they carry any pathogen, it's not transmitted to the food. We don't have that luxury during outdoorsman activities such as hiking, but we do have two tools we can use to limit exposure. Carry and use hand sanitizer. Use it before and after ...



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