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14

Apart from the practical advantages mentioned in practicality of beards, there's also some aspects that are special to remote and/or high altitude trekking: Melting snow to obtain water costs a lot of fuel (and time) which makes water quite a valuable good. You don't want to spend 10% or more of your expensively molten water just to pollute it with shaving ...


13

The idea that caffeinated drinks dehydrate you or "don't count" toward your body's water requirement is a myth. Laboratory studies have shown that caffeinated soda is just as hydrating as water, i.e., the diuretic effect of the caffeine is too small to measure.[Grandjean 2000] Even in the case of coffee, which has much higher concentrations of caffeine than ...


11

Headaches are common symptoms of altitude sickness. It's a sign your brain is not getting enough oxygen. As with lots of mountain issues it's down to judgement. If the headache is impairing your ability to perform at altitude, then yes, it's dangerous. If you can't concentrate on what your doing then your a danger to yourself and others. Bear in mind, ...


10

Anecdotally, the only three factors which may cause you problems are: supplies running out losing fitness boredom And these are really only an issue if you are stuck for extended periods of time. Your solutions are: exercises you can do in your tent, or just outside - stretches, press-ups, sit-ups, basic cardio - will help you maintain a level of ...


8

Aerobic conditioning will help a little with the altitude. You can practice walking / running on a treadmill at 15% incline. You can practice walking with a loaded backpack. Bonus points for doing it on an inclined treadmill.


8

The Problem with metallic equipment and cold temperatures is that your hands are moist, if you touch a very cold metallic surface (or any other smooth surface), your moisture will freeze to the surface which causes the top layer of your skin to get stuck on the surface. For Example: it's freezing cold outside and you put your tongue (which is very moist, ...


8

The first thing you need to ask yourself is why is there so much rubbish? Getting things up and down to Everest base camp is exhausting! The Sherpas (who do the vast majority of the lifting and carrying, and are typically not paid well) have no incentive to carry down things that the majority of their western clients don't ask about. Clients typically don't ...


7

There isn't necessarily a way to prepare your body for the altitude. You should however: Be in good condition overall, i.e. able to handle at sea level more than you are planning to do at altitude. Try to spend several days at a lower altitude (like 7000 feet) doing some aerobic activity before trying to go higher. Drink more water than usual. Take ...


7

Sounds like a myth to me. The only thing that could possibly come into play is the pressure inside your head. But in order to hold the pressure inside your head constant, you would have to plug your ears with something air-tight, not open your mouth, et cetera. I can’t see how a beanie hat or something like that could prevent the outside and inside pressures ...


7

Either option is acceptable, particularly since you aren't going very high. There are rare instances where people get Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) or worse even at relatively low altitudes, and these are more common when there is no acclimatization. However, it is very rare for such problems to suddenly arise and not be fixable (through rapid descent). Each ...


7

General fitness is the only technique you can employ without going to higher altitudes. Acclimatization is the most common technique. Altitude sickness occurs at 2,400 m, so you go to a base camp (for example Cuzco if you're doing the Incan trail, or the South/North Base camps for Everest) and you let your body adjust to the altitude over a few days ...


7

The key to survival of any species in any part of the world is having a sustainable source of food. This applies to snakes as well. For snakes, humans are not food. For them, rats, lizards, scorpions, frogs etc act as food. When you specifically talk of snow covered areas, it is impossible for a snake to live. Or any cold blooded animal for that matter. I ...


7

If you'd lost, broken or simply didn't have any googles, I know in the days before effective UV protective eyewear, explorers would wear goggles with thin slits cut into them to reduce the amount of light entering the eye. In an emergency situation you could probably knock this up with a knife and some simple materials. How effective it would be, I don't ...


6

Snow blindness in simple terms is burning of the cornea and conjunctiva due to UV rays. At higher altitudes, the UV rays are more as less atmosphere is there to absorb these UV rays. Hence there is a higher chance of snow blindness at higher altitudes. Symptoms: Intense pain in the eyes. Huge amount of tears. Preventive Measures: Wear a protective ...


6

There is no documented scientific relationship between individual blood pressure and AMS. Furthermore, your guide appears to be completely mis-informed as to the mechanics of AMS. The most common symptom of AMS - a roaring headache - is caused by swelling of the brain as the body attempts to make up for reduced oxygen in the blood by pumping harder and ...


6

Other tidbits I've heard from local** guides: Wearing red increases your risk of being struck by lightning Burning egg shells will anger forest spirits and cause nightmares and illness The quickest way to heal a compound fracture is to wrap it with raw chicken Sticking tobacco in your socks will ward off leeches (this may have some validity). That's half ...


6

Personally I do not know of any deterministic way judging acclimatization. Right now, the actions to be taken are more "Reactive". i.e, in case one feels the symptoms of AMS, then one can take a call of going down or camping at the current altitude to get acclimatized. As a thumb rule, if you climb higher, and sleep lower, your body should get adjusted to ...


6

Would have to agree. In the west we have been accused of being overly clean. after a few days you will likely reach some form of equilibrium with the mess. And while I don't recommend going more than a fortnight, its unlikely to be too much of a concern. Also it gives that first shower and shave after the trip an extra special "return to normal" feeling. ...


6

I had always assumed that after you adapted to the thin air, the risk to your body was how thick your blood got with the production of extra red blood cells to compensate for the lack of oxygen. an increase of red blood cells will only happen after a long period of time. This is why athletes often train at high altitude. this is a very gradual ...


6

There's an inn/tea house/lodging at Gorak Shep. It's about 2-3 hours walk from the base camp. In 2004, when I was there, most of the villages and lodgings on the way to Everest had, at the very least, the possibility of a "hot bucket" shower, which is basically a closed room where a person with a bucket of hot water can clean themselves. I don't remember if ...


5

For me, as a thumb rule, when on high altitude treks, I do not go for any food which is digestion intensive. i.e, any food which required a lot of oxygen to get digested is not favorable. You can always have chocolate bars/energy bars at higher altitudes. Herbal tea is something that keeps you hydrated and gives you decent amount of caffeine at the same ...


5

If it's a nice summer's day at lowest avalanche warning level in mid altitude you can still be hit by an avalanche and die. That being said in reference to the answer of @BenCrowell and the comments, it's just a matter of chances which are relatively low to get AMS (which are effecting your body in a serious matter) in regions up to 3000 m or even slightly ...


5

Three thoughts: If the snow is thigh-high, then you should be either using touring skis or snowshoes to "float" over the snow. You'll expend way less energy. Seriously, I can cover probably 10x-50x the distance (or more) with alpine touring gear or snowshoes in the same amount of time as someone without, and that's regardless of the angle of slope. ...


5

An unhurdled slip-and-drop would be fatal without a doubt. If this is the case, then maybe you need a belay. However, if the snow is sufficiently deep and soft that you're sinking up to your knees, why is it the case that slipping and being unable to self-arrest is so dangerous? In these conditions, typically you can't even intentionally get going fast ...


5

In my opinion the best would be to have a couple of more advanced friends who are able to teach or even know guides or groups and go with them for fun and to learn. Unfortunately I am not having this opportunity (yet?). How that, when you are already a member of the DAV? It is first and foremost an club of mountain enthusiasts, not a provider of ...


5

I don't think you have to treat that topic significantly different than on lower altitudes (but I have to admit, I have never been higher than 4300 m) as long as you stick to trekking. As you already introduce your question, warming up is especially important for sports where maximum strength (e.g. climbing) and/or explosive muscle movement (e.g. ...


5

The conductive property of the material is a critical part of this phenomenon. It would be safe to handle many plastics at very low temperatures because energy from your hand (and the moisture on it) isn't readily conducted away, and the energy that is, takes a while to dissipate into the rest of the material so the point of contact retains the transferred ...


4

Here is a clip from this webpage (http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/acclimatization-to-altitude.html): Preparing for Competition at Altitude How can athletes who live at sea level prepare for a competition at altitude? One approach is to compete within 24 hours of arrival at altitude. Not much acclimatization will have taken place but ...


4

This is really funny because I am from Toronto(Sea Level) and flew to Denver a couple months ago and climbed Bierstadt the morning after arriving followed by Quandary Peak the next day. Upon arriving in Denver I drove to sleep at 10,000ft then woke up early and climbed Bierstadt. Will the effects and onset of altitude sickness exacerbated by the short ...


4

Energy bars (and protein bars, power bars, etc) are typically dehydrated in order to improve shelf life as well as increase the ratio of calories/nutrients to weight. Their longevity and energy per ounce make them ideal foods for hikers and mountaineers, but your body will require some additional water to metabolize the nutrients and ingredients. However, ...



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