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I had always assumed that after you adapted to the thin air, the risk to your body was how thick your blood got with the production of extra red blood cells to compensate for the lack of oxygen. an increase of red blood cells will only happen after a long period of time. This is why athletes often train at high altitude. this is a very gradual ...


5

There's an inn/tea house/lodging at Gorak Shep. It's about 2-3 hours walk from the base camp. In 2004, when I was there, most of the villages and lodgings on the way to Everest had, at the very least, the possibility of a "hot bucket" shower, which is basically a closed room where a person with a bucket of hot water can clean themselves. I don't remember if ...


4

I'll try and be brief but specific towards answering your question: What exactly happens to your body at high altitude? Disclaimer: A lot of data is from Wiki Pages and definitions from Human Anatomy and Physiology Books. Breathlessness and Hyperventilation: Does it start with one panting for breathe? Yes it does! We all know that Atmospheric pressure ...


3

If you have the equipment already, I would go back to the book and practice using the equipment. In the US the standard text is Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills; there may be equivalents in other countries. Basic techniques such as knots can be practiced in your home, and a bit of regular practice each day should soon make them second nature. With a ...


1

The weather is very harsh, and the mountain does not allow much area to take a walk on a day when you are not going up the mountain. This sounds like two points mixed up. Is it the bad weather what keeps you on the camp or is it the lack of routes or ideas? For the last part I would suggest to at least go up and/or down on the route you are planning to do. ...



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