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24

I personally had a similar sort of a question when I first went through similar kind of stats about these mountains. Getting introduced with these stats is different than totally understanding the mountain and the pandora box it opens. For getting acquainted with the reasons for so many failed attempts, one needs to read tactical data and expedition reports. ...


15

Apart from the practical advantages mentioned in practicality of beards, there's also some aspects that are special to remote and/or high altitude trekking: Melting snow to obtain water costs a lot of fuel (and time) which makes water quite a valuable good. You don't want to spend 10% or more of your expensively molten water just to pollute it with shaving ...


11

As with clothes you were wearing while you climbed, the liner boots are damp - if not wet from the days activity. Energy is required to evaporate the moisture - this cools you down, including your feet. You get cold from it very easily. Also as most people will feel cold if they have cold feet, so you will feel cold even if you are actually warm enough. In ...


10

The first thing you need to ask yourself is why is there so much rubbish? Getting things up and down to Everest base camp is exhausting! The Sherpas (who do the vast majority of the lifting and carrying, and are typically not paid well) have no incentive to carry down things that the majority of their western clients don't ask about. Clients typically don't ...


10

Several things kill people on mountains, many of these are within the individuals control (ensuring they have the right kit, etc.) I'm going to ignore these because all things being equal these should be relatively static (i.e. the mountain itself doesn't make a person more or less well prepared) So here are some factors that affect how dangerous or not a ...


10

Anecdotally, the only three factors which may cause you problems are: supplies running out losing fitness boredom And these are really only an issue if you are stuck for extended periods of time. Your solutions are: exercises you can do in your tent, or just outside - stretches, press-ups, sit-ups, basic cardio - will help you maintain a level of ...


9

Altitude acclimatization is not just a single change in your body but a long list of different things that are going on. There is a nice chart on p. 326 of House and Johnston, Training for the New Alpinism, which gives a list of the following adaptations (they label #6 as two items): increased ventilation rate increased heart rate and blood pressure blood ...


9

The Problem with metallic equipment and cold temperatures is that your hands are moist, if you touch a very cold metallic surface (or any other smooth surface), your moisture will freeze to the surface which causes the top layer of your skin to get stuck on the surface. For Example: it's freezing cold outside and you put your tongue (which is very moist, ...


9

To answer your first question,"If the situation asks for it, should a mountaineer be donating blood at higher altitude?" I'm assuming you're referring to a life and death situation on the mountain where someone desperately needs an emergency transfusion to survive an accident, and whether or not it is safe to offer your blood. My answer would be yes, you ...


8

I'll try and be brief but specific towards answering your question: What exactly happens to your body at high altitude? Disclaimer: A lot of data is from Wiki Pages and definitions from Human Anatomy and Physiology Books. Breathlessness and Hyperventilation: Does it start with one panting for breathe? Yes it does! We all know that Atmospheric pressure ...


8

I had always assumed that after you adapted to the thin air, the risk to your body was how thick your blood got with the production of extra red blood cells to compensate for the lack of oxygen. an increase of red blood cells will only happen after a long period of time. This is why athletes often train at high altitude. this is a very gradual ...


8

The standard expedition stove for extreme conditions would be an MSR XGK. You will likely want to bring a pair of them, along with a repair kit, on the assumption that due to the cold or poor quality fuel you'll break a pump or need to make other repairs. Now, you may be thinking "what are all those people doing with canister stoves on ...


6

You asked about dosing. My recommendation is to get a professional to figure out the dosing. If you cannot get a professional, then do not carry this as you are potentially introducing as much risk as you are mitigating. When carrying a medication such as this for a possible emergency, there are several things I would recommend. Get a doctor to prescribe ...


6

There's an inn/tea house/lodging at Gorak Shep. It's about 2-3 hours walk from the base camp. In 2004, when I was there, most of the villages and lodgings on the way to Everest had, at the very least, the possibility of a "hot bucket" shower, which is basically a closed room where a person with a bucket of hot water can clean themselves. I don't remember if ...


6

Would have to agree. In the west we have been accused of being overly clean. after a few days you will likely reach some form of equilibrium with the mess. And while I don't recommend going more than a fortnight, its unlikely to be too much of a concern. Also it gives that first shower and shave after the trip an extra special "return to normal" feeling. ...


5

These are emergency kit - specifically to help those suffering health problems due to altitude. As I understand it they are used within the climber's tent or bivouac, which provides the shelter required, and they provide an environment that matches a lower altitude, through pressurising the bag, allowing altitude sickness to be alleviated. So, looking at ...


5

I don't think you have to treat that topic significantly different than on lower altitudes (but I have to admit, I have never been higher than 4300 m) as long as you stick to trekking. As you already introduce your question, warming up is especially important for sports where maximum strength (e.g. climbing) and/or explosive muscle movement (e.g. ...


5

The conductive property of the material is a critical part of this phenomenon. It would be safe to handle many plastics at very low temperatures because energy from your hand (and the moisture on it) isn't readily conducted away, and the energy that is, takes a while to dissipate into the rest of the material so the point of contact retains the transferred ...


5

I'm going to assume your question is geared towards high altitude (20,000+ ft) climbing. Haven't done any myself but this topic is covered at length in almost every book written regarding Everest and the other 25k peaks. Is this style of complicated looking height progression done nowadays too? A common mantra for high-altitude acclimatization is ...


4

As a beard wearer for many years (though not for ever) I would recommend not shaving. The practical benefits of not having to wet shave when water and energy are at a premium, let alone the logistics of carrying batteries for your trimmer are pretty obvious. The hygiene risk is actually slightly lower as you are not putting a sharp but not necessarily clean ...


4

If you have the equipment already, I would go back to the book and practice using the equipment. In the US the standard text is Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills; there may be equivalents in other countries. Basic techniques such as knots can be practiced in your home, and a bit of regular practice each day should soon make them second nature. With a ...


4

I'm guessing by "thinness" you mean the ability to breath air. Couple of things to note here: Your ability to breath decreases as your altitude increases because of a lack of Oxygen. the relative amount of Oxygen in the air is static (there is almost exactly the same percentage of oxygen 23% at 10,000 feet as 1 foot). What does decrease at altitude is the ...


3

The weather is very harsh, and the mountain does not allow much area to take a walk on a day when you are not going up the mountain. This sounds like two points mixed up. Is it the bad weather what keeps you on the camp or is it the lack of routes or ideas? For the last part I would suggest to at least go up and/or down on the route you are planning to do. ...


3

The answers given already address almost all the issues well, but I'd like to add one final point which hasn't been given enough focus; ease of descent in case something goes wrong. If the OP's sister arrives, makes it up, and comes down before the AMS symptoms begin, that's great. But if something goes wrong and she's stuck at 4000+ meters, she is in some ...


3

The graph looks exactly like a bunch of graphs in House and Johnston, Training for the New Alpinism, pp. 334-337, except for the scale on the time axis. The ones in House and Johnston are for modern climbs that are not done in "siege style." They even have one for Nanga Parbat, which covers a time period of about 35 days, from 3700 m to the summit. It looks ...


2

Anecdotal evidence: my wife and I take periodic trips from a few hundred meters altitude to 3000-4000m (and sometimes over a pass at 4480m). We feel that going a little as one weekend per month provides a noticeable benefit. We've even camped in the same spot at ~3900m on a couple occasions and definitely slept better the second time.


2

Wearing gloves constantly is quite normal in the temperatures below -10 C, and on the high altitudes, the temperatures are much lower. Additionally, metal has high warm conductivity, which means, touching it will quickly drawn warmth from you. There are anecdotes about stupid guys tricked by mean girls to lick the axe by the low temperatures, which causes ...


1

You're sleeping bag only works if you can get it warm. If you wear too many clothes in your sleeping bag, you're not going to fill the loft of your expensive down mummy with cozy warm body heat. This is what can happen if you're wearing your liners in bed, the bag around your feet doesn't warm up. I think whether or not you get cold toes depends a lot on ...


1

The answer to, "What are the real dangers of climbing at high altitude?" thus far appears to be, "Being in an environment that cannot sustain life." The exact causes of the effects of altitude still appear to be largely unknown, and research is ongoing. This answer is community wiki, if you happen upon any relevant articles regarding research on the effects ...



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