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26

Hot soup mostly, it does depend on the individual diets of the climbers, not everybody eats the same thing, but most carry hot soup with them. Despite the massive amounts of energy needed to summit Everest, the truth is most climbers don't eat much on summit day, and that's simply because they don't have an appetite due to the high elevation. Many climbers ...


12

In 1996, they seemed to enjoy chocolate bars and candies. From some of the accounts of the infamous 1996 season related by the 2015 movie, apart for the classic soup, tea and fluids, we can consider "junk food" on summit day: Matt Dickinson (the other side of Everest) eats Muesli and pistachio nuts. Lou Kasischke (After the wind) was very fond of ...


11

It has to go down to all the High-Altitude diets, and not just specific to Mt. Everest. Anywhere above 23,000 feet / 7,000 meters most of the mountaineers lose their appetite to a considerable level. So, at that altitude losing weight is a common observation. Thats where the fats come in picture. Body starts consuming these bodily fats and worst case muscles ...


10

Lemon juice and tinned fruit From Tenzing's autobiography Man of Everest We started pitching the highest camp that has ever been made. And it took us almost until it was dark. First we chopped away at the ice to try and make our sleeping-place a little more level. Then we struggled with frozen ropes and canvas, and tied the ropes around the ...


8

I could not find evidence of an existing test and there is no widely accepting known cause. The only risk factor commonly noted is having been previously affected by AMS. Other mentioned risk factors include: anemia preexisting heart or lung disease However I found one article about a study done by a subgroup of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ...


7

Many people at moderate altitudes (about 10,000-13,000', 3000-4000 m) experience mild AMS (acute mountain sickness). The most common symptom is a headache. Mild AMS is not life-threatening, and people may experience similar symptoms due to other factors that are common in a mountain environment, such as lack of sleep, caffeine withdrawal, sunburn, or ...


6

Is there a connection between stress and difficulty in acclimatizing? No, no known connection has been made between stress and acclimatizing at altitude. Does this mean that stress couldn't make acclimatizing worse? Probably not. It's simply not known what affect this has (It would also be difficult to test) Acclimatization is an extremely ...


5

My guess - you were not suffering AMS symptom, but you were in potentially big trouble. Normally AMS symptoms take time - up to 24 or even 48 hours to develop. When I was climbing Alpamayo (6000m), a guy got carried off after he came up from sea level and attempted the peak in a day. His aim was bag the peak (6000m) and get down to 3000 within 24hours and ...


4

For part one, there are two aspects to consider: one is the regular old hit to the cardiovascular system that makes you tired more quickly because the air is thinner. This will affect you and your dog pretty much equally. However, many dogs will run until they are totally exhausted whenever there is adventure involved, so this aspect at worst it will just ...


4

I guess one of the central concerns with AMS is that you can never know when it hits you. You can prepare, acclimatize and try to avoid all the stupid mistakes - but even under perfect conditions, and even if you have a successful history of climbing at altitude it can hit you any time. From what you described I don't see any obvious mistakes. It sound like ...


4

As a speculation, you may have a ceiling of about 16,500 feet. This speculation is reinforced by your starting to feel stronger as you passed 16,500 on the way down. Was this the first time you climbed above 16,500? My husband had an office mate -- very tough, fit guy -- who puked regularly at 13,000 feet, and felt awful. Finally he accepted his ...


3

As a general rule: Assume acute mountain sickness (AMS) unless proven otherwise. AMS is potentially life threatening, so if you have symptoms related to AMS, do not ascend any further. If they do not get better, descend. Low altitude is not an indication against AMS which can occur above 2000m already. So the assessment should rely on your symptoms. Early ...


2

I did it in 11 hours last year and had a great time doing it. Will always remember this hike! I see there is some discussion about how fit you need to be to do this - I can run a half marathon in just below 2 hours. And I weigh 90kgs, so I have some weight to carry. I started from Playa del Socorro early in the morning, it's a few kilometers west of Puerto ...


1

I have low blood pressure, 90/60 read to me just one week prior to going mountain hiking in Palm Springs California (8,500 ft. elevation). I did not experience the tiredness or lack of oxygen I thought that I would. I seemed to have the same energy as I usually have without any adverse symptoms associated to what many would complain as thinner air at that ...



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