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13

Apart from the practical advantages mentioned in practicality of beards, there's also some aspects that are special to remote and/or high altitude trekking: Melting snow to obtain water costs a lot of fuel (and time) which makes water quite a valuable good. You don't want to spend 10% or more of your expensively molten water just to pollute it with shaving ...


13

The idea that caffeinated drinks dehydrate you or "don't count" toward your body's water requirement is a myth. Laboratory studies have shown that caffeinated soda is just as hydrating as water, i.e., the diuretic effect of the caffeine is too small to measure.[Grandjean 2000] Even in the case of coffee, which has much higher concentrations of caffeine than ...


11

Headaches are common symptoms of altitude sickness. It's a sign your brain is not getting enough oxygen. As with lots of mountain issues it's down to judgement. If the headache is impairing your ability to perform at altitude, then yes, it's dangerous. If you can't concentrate on what your doing then your a danger to yourself and others. Bear in mind, ...


10

Anecdotally, the only three factors which may cause you problems are: supplies running out losing fitness boredom And these are really only an issue if you are stuck for extended periods of time. Your solutions are: exercises you can do in your tent, or just outside - stretches, press-ups, sit-ups, basic cardio - will help you maintain a level of ...


8

The Problem with metallic equipment and cold temperatures is that your hands are moist, if you touch a very cold metallic surface (or any other smooth surface), your moisture will freeze to the surface which causes the top layer of your skin to get stuck on the surface. For Example: it's freezing cold outside and you put your tongue (which is very moist, ...


8

The first thing you need to ask yourself is why is there so much rubbish? Getting things up and down to Everest base camp is exhausting! The Sherpas (who do the vast majority of the lifting and carrying, and are typically not paid well) have no incentive to carry down things that the majority of their western clients don't ask about. Clients typically don't ...


7

If you'd lost, broken or simply didn't have any googles, I know in the days before effective UV protective eyewear, explorers would wear goggles with thin slits cut into them to reduce the amount of light entering the eye. In an emergency situation you could probably knock this up with a knife and some simple materials. How effective it would be, I don't ...


6

There is no documented scientific relationship between individual blood pressure and AMS. Furthermore, your guide appears to be completely mis-informed as to the mechanics of AMS. The most common symptom of AMS - a roaring headache - is caused by swelling of the brain as the body attempts to make up for reduced oxygen in the blood by pumping harder and ...


6

Snow blindness in simple terms is burning of the cornea and conjunctiva due to UV rays. At higher altitudes, the UV rays are more as less atmosphere is there to absorb these UV rays. Hence there is a higher chance of snow blindness at higher altitudes. Symptoms: Intense pain in the eyes. Huge amount of tears. Preventive Measures: Wear a protective ...


6

Would have to agree. In the west we have been accused of being overly clean. after a few days you will likely reach some form of equilibrium with the mess. And while I don't recommend going more than a fortnight, its unlikely to be too much of a concern. Also it gives that first shower and shave after the trip an extra special "return to normal" feeling. ...


5

The conductive property of the material is a critical part of this phenomenon. It would be safe to handle many plastics at very low temperatures because energy from your hand (and the moisture on it) isn't readily conducted away, and the energy that is, takes a while to dissipate into the rest of the material so the point of contact retains the transferred ...


5

I don't think you have to treat that topic significantly different than on lower altitudes (but I have to admit, I have never been higher than 4300 m) as long as you stick to trekking. As you already introduce your question, warming up is especially important for sports where maximum strength (e.g. climbing) and/or explosive muscle movement (e.g. ...


5

In my opinion the best would be to have a couple of more advanced friends who are able to teach or even know guides or groups and go with them for fun and to learn. Unfortunately I am not having this opportunity (yet?). How that, when you are already a member of the DAV? It is first and foremost an club of mountain enthusiasts, not a provider of ...


5

Three thoughts: If the snow is thigh-high, then you should be either using touring skis or snowshoes to "float" over the snow. You'll expend way less energy. Seriously, I can cover probably 10x-50x the distance (or more) with alpine touring gear or snowshoes in the same amount of time as someone without, and that's regardless of the angle of slope. ...


5

An unhurdled slip-and-drop would be fatal without a doubt. If this is the case, then maybe you need a belay. However, if the snow is sufficiently deep and soft that you're sinking up to your knees, why is it the case that slipping and being unable to self-arrest is so dangerous? In these conditions, typically you can't even intentionally get going fast ...


5

If it's a nice summer's day at lowest avalanche warning level in mid altitude you can still be hit by an avalanche and die. That being said in reference to the answer of @BenCrowell and the comments, it's just a matter of chances which are relatively low to get AMS (which are effecting your body in a serious matter) in regions up to 3000 m or even slightly ...


4

You are right, if you gain 3000+ meters within 6 hours, you are susceptible to AMS. A safe vertical height gain per day would be around 1000 meters. But since your question is more about what other symptoms to watch out for to identify AMS, here are a few that you can keep an eye on: Nausea. Dizziness. Loss of appetite(But at higher altitudes, this can be ...


4

Energy bars (and protein bars, power bars, etc) are typically dehydrated in order to improve shelf life as well as increase the ratio of calories/nutrients to weight. Their longevity and energy per ounce make them ideal foods for hikers and mountaineers, but your body will require some additional water to metabolize the nutrients and ingredients. However, ...


4

In terms of the average hike that you talk about, with not reaching your intended campsite, there's really no difference in bivouacking and just camping without a tent. So you'd basically look for similar conditions that you'd normally camp in. Find a place out of the wind, preferably with a cover like trees. Make sure you're on high ground and not in ...


4

I'm guessing by "thinness" you mean the ability to breath air. Couple of things to note here: Your ability to breath decreases as your altitude increases because of a lack of Oxygen. the relative amount of Oxygen in the air is static (there is almost exactly the same percentage of oxygen 23% at 10,000 feet as 1 foot). What does decrease at altitude is the ...


4

The other answers already gave lots of information about altitude adaption, so I will focus on one certain point: AMS (acute mountain sickness) evolves when staying at high altitudes. It is a pathologic disease with potential severe consequences. This should not be mixed up with the immediate influences of high altitude on the body like decrease of physical ...


4

Here is a clip from this webpage (http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/acclimatization-to-altitude.html): Preparing for Competition at Altitude How can athletes who live at sea level prepare for a competition at altitude? One approach is to compete within 24 hours of arrival at altitude. Not much acclimatization will have taken place but ...


4

This is really funny because I am from Toronto(Sea Level) and flew to Denver a couple months ago and climbed Bierstadt the morning after arriving followed by Quandary Peak the next day. Upon arriving in Denver I drove to sleep at 10,000ft then woke up early and climbed Bierstadt. Will the effects and onset of altitude sickness exacerbated by the short ...


4

You asked about dosing. My recommendation is to get a professional to figure out the dosing. If you cannot get a professional, then do not carry this as you are potentially introducing as much risk as you are mitigating. When carrying a medication such as this for a possible emergency, there are several things I would recommend. Get a doctor to prescribe ...


4

As a beard wearer for many years (though not for ever) I would recommend not shaving. The practical benefits of not having to wet shave when water and energy are at a premium, let alone the logistics of carrying batteries for your trimmer are pretty obvious. The hygiene risk is actually slightly lower as you are not putting a sharp but not necessarily clean ...


3

The answers given already address almost all the issues well, but I'd like to add one final point which hasn't been given enough focus; ease of descent in case something goes wrong. If the OP's sister arrives, makes it up, and comes down before the AMS symptoms begin, that's great. But if something goes wrong and she's stuck at 4000+ meters, she is in some ...


3

As your body gets used to the altitude, the symptoms go away. Therefore, if symptoms persist, Yes you should be worried. Altitude sickness can affect your lungs and brain. When this happens, symptoms include being confused, not being able to walk straight (ataxia), feeling faint, and having blue or gray lips or fingernails. When you breathe, you may hear a ...


3

If you have the equipment already, I would go back to the book and practice using the equipment. In the US the standard text is Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills; there may be equivalents in other countries. Basic techniques such as knots can be practiced in your home, and a bit of regular practice each day should soon make them second nature. With a ...


2

British mountaineer Andy Kirkpatrick has quite a bit of useful information regarding how to look after your feet at altitude and in cold conditions on his website at http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/how_to_avoid_frostbitten_feet. The only recommendation on footwear size he gives with respect to high altitude, is for Neoprene socks. He ...


1

Wearing gloves constantly is quite normal in the temperatures below -10 C, and on the high altitudes, the temperatures are much lower. Additionally, metal has high warm conductivity, which means, touching it will quickly drawn warmth from you. There are anecdotes about stupid guys tricked by mean girls to lick the axe by the low temperatures, which causes ...



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