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14

According to regulations in Tanzania, you can't climb Kilimanjaro without a guide. That means you will 100% be with somebody that understands the nature of acclimatization and has likely been up many many times previously. When you hire a guide, or book a guided trip via a company, they will also take care of permits for you. Most companies automatically ...


11

By "black bear", I'll assume you mean Ursus americanus, the North American black bear. These bears are opportunists and aren't looking for a fight. In all the encounters I have had with them in the wild that I know of, they have run away as soon as they noticed me. I probably had many more encounters where the bear noticed me and took off before I noticed ...


9

I wrote up some notes here that me be helpful. Climbing Kilimanjaro is not a big deal. It doesn't require a lot of stamina or strength, because the need for gradual acclimatization severely limits how far you can go every day. It's not legal to climb without a guide, and when you pay for a guide, you're also typically also getting a lot of support, which is ...


7

An adult person burns between 100 to 150 kcal additionally per 100m elevation gained. Moreover, if you carried some common back bag you should add around 50 to 100 calories per hour. If the bag was very heavy you should add around 200 calories per hour. Of course, these are only average values - for a more exact calculation we would need the weight, age of ...


7

Here are two pretty useful articles on the correct way to use poles: one shortish one and one longer quite comprehensive one. There are several aims in using a pole. Primarily (IMHO) is to reduce strain on the knees/ankles. Additionally they they provide extra stability on rough ground and can make going uphill easier. The disadvantage is they result in ...


7

Aligning the answer strictly for Kilimanjaro, I'd first recommend you to select the route that you are going to take. If you want to take the easiest way up, the Marangu route shall be perfectly suitable for you (No offence, just in case if you remain unprepared, if you have been preparing well, you might try the other routes. I'd consider taking two ...


7

I don't have personal experience with black bears, but only brownies. If you encounter a bear in 10 meters away from you that means you surprised it or the bear is coming after you. In a night scenario with a whistle and flashlight the surprise cannot be a real life case. That means bear is actually after you and that's very bad. Black bear may want to ...


6

You don't even need to worry about a bear mugging you while you're hiking. It doesn't happen. Bears want your food. They're going to try to get your food when your food is out of your pack and they can smell it. The effective countermeasures involve: Making it hard for them to smell your food (e.g., using ziplock bags) Making it hard for them to get your ...


6

Killamanjaro has relatively simple terrain. The main issue with climbing it is it's height (it's nearly 6000m/20,000feet). You will need to acclimatise correctly. It will take several days to do this so you will need to spend some time on the mountain (this won't be a day hike!) Most people who climb this mountain do so as part of an organised group. If ...


6

Firstly if you are on your own a four man tent is probably excessive. People buy small two man/trekking tents so that it is easy to carry them and one doesn't have this sort of problem. If you are in a larger group then it is not necessary for one person to carry the entire tent. You can break it up into at least poles, fly and inner. Different people can ...


5

You don't mention any first-aid or survival items. I would include a first aid kit with maybe a compass and signaling mirror, maybe a firestarter of some kind. I would think that would add a negligible amount of weight to your rig.


4

Those values seem to be over-exaggerated. I was once measured by the professional equipment (from the local university) and my callory usage was 5000-6000 kcal a day, with average 20 km hike and 1000 meters elevation. This included the normal metabolism per day (about 2000-2500 kcal) + increased metabolism because of cold temperatures in night. The measures ...


4

I would recommend a site like CalTopo (my favorite) or Hillmap; you can import GPX files into them, or click on points to define a path. For Caltopo, creating a path by clicking might not be immediately obvious; first choose "Add New Object", then select "Line", and once you've edited any details you can click each waypoint or hold down shift while ...


4

The insoles typically are the first thing that gets worn out. Insoles will eventually flatten from the weight of your body. this will then put downward pressure on your arches. Insoles get flattened from use and no longer hold your heel in the correct place. I've had tough and irritating times when my insoles got so flat that, in wet conditions, they would ...


3

There a so many things to consider when you calculate one such thing, and it would again involve a lot of data, equations and that too with subtle variations in data. For an example, there are people walking at different speeds, there would be differences, especially between walking and running. You know, with trekking/hiking, its practically hard to draw ...


3

For central Europe I can recommend www.wanderreitkarte.de, which is a German site but has also an English and Italian language layer. Its data is based on openstreetmap data which is (at least in Germany) much more detailed off the beaten track than google maps is. Unfortunately it does not contain Norway, where your hike has obviously been done. ...


3

For a bare essential setup, you'll do just fine. You might want to consider: Better food selection Duct tape Emergency kit Light source Change the water containers Mini-carabiner Prefer non-canned goods because they are lighter, take less space and the resulting trash compacts better. You can find tuna packs too. You can roll duct tape on your poles or ...


2

I suspect you are bringing more items than you have listed, since you've alluded to some of them in the comments. That said, here's what I see as missing or improvable: Flashlight. Is that because you carry it on you? An LED microlight is quite small. Letting your eyes adapt to the dark often works, but sometimes more is needed. Kitchen gear. Are you ...


2

If you read the Snow Leopard, from Peter Matthiessen, he discusses this exact issue and looks at how the Tibetans handle it. Part of Buddhist teaching is that as human beings we are at one with nature, with earth, with our surroundings. Understand this carefully. We are no better than anything around us - we are part of it. So the Buddhists, just as Olin ...



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