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38

No, it would not be offensive. A survey of 200 pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago found that motivations were as follows, in order of importance: Exercise Adventure Peace, solitude, relaxation Spiritual (but not explicitly religious) A lifetime experience A religious pilgrimage (9.6%) To meet people. Source: Top reasons why people walk the Camino As ...


12

Would it make sense to carry soda instead of water in respect to save weight (you can carry less food because you have energy in your "water")? No, for a variety of reasons (leaving out, as you say "other health related topics"): Sugar, powdered Gatorade, and many other water additives all weigh less than soda. Soda comes in cans/bottles which you'll ...


10

It's not strictly too soon. I have known plenty of people who camped with a nine month old in rougher conditions than you describe. It's too early if you are not in condition to carry a baby in addition to all of your gear. They make packs specifically for carrying wee ones. That's really the best way to go.


8

I go to my local pharmacy and ask for medicine-grade screw-top bottles. These have good seals and only cost pennies. To be doubly sure I place the bottle in a plastic bag and carry it in an outside pocket of my pack. All this may seem a bit paranoid, but I once had a nasty experience with butter on my sleeping bag...


8

Depending on how much you need you can get a variety of food grade plastic bottles for carrying liquids. To avoid drips probably the best option is a squeeze type bottle with both a nozzle and a screw top lid. The combination of a screw top and squirt nozzle gives a good combination of ease of refilling, seal security and ease of use with minimal dripping. ...


8

Carrying all the gear won't be easy. Whoever has the baby will probably only be able to carry one day's worth of baby stuff and nothing else. Either you get a rucksack carrier as Russell suggested (I recommend this as well, a Deuter kid comfort fitted me and was still usable over age 2), or you wear a daypack as well as a front carrier and have 2 sets of ...


7

Let's say we have a liter of coke and liter of water. Both of them weight nearly the same. However, the coke contains a lot of calories whereas the water contains none. The law of conservation of mass, tells us that the total mass/weight of a solution is equal to the sum of the masses of the solute and solvent. So if you add 100 g of sugar (the solute) ...


7

For a day hike, yes, it could make sense, if it's the type of day hike where you need to carry water rather than drinking from sources along the way. It's really just a matter of what you enjoy. If you enjoy drinking soda, bring soda. Let's say we have a liter of coke and liter of water. Both of them weight nearly the same. However, the coke contains a ...


7

There is a fair argument that the general experience of hiking is part of the religious experience of a pilgrimage , for example, solitude, relaxtion , physical exercise and exploring the natural world. So it would seem unreasonable for anybody to take offense that you want to experience those things from a secular rather than religious perspective. The ...


6

Some years ago I had the same problem. But, while shopping at my grocery store I looked at the olive oil options. Several came in small plastic bottles (maybe 3 oz), and since they were 'real' olive oil bottles had the funky no-drip top. After using up the original oil I've just refilled as necessary. Look around at your local supermarket.


6

Iceland has some of the remotest landscapes in Europe and its not difficult to find solitude and choose a hiking route where there are neither vehicles nor people if you so wish. With a population of only 300'000 in a country the same size as Ireland, it is 80% uninhabited and very easy to enter a completely remote and untouched hiking destination. As an ...


5

If you want to cross from west to east you could research the venerable TGO Challenge walk, where hundreds each May walk their own coast-to-coast route. If you Google "TGO Challenge" you'll find a large number of blogs discussing routes in detail. As others have said, for maximum Munro bagging, you'd probably want to cross the Nevis range and the ...


5

From a fluid perspective - The energy density of most soda (non-diet types) is high enough to kick off a digestive system response for processing food, which requires fluids and oxygen. In the case of dehydration or high levels of exertion, where fluid replacement is the aim this is undesirable. Coke and energy drinks that contain Caffeine add a diuretic, ...


4

What's the limitation here? Back in the old days there were no climbing boots available so rock climbers used boots (maybe enhanced with metal plates). Also in icy terrain this was the case. Even when Eiger Northface was climbed first not all party members had crampons. (people also climbed barefoot very steep and tough rock routes, even today some are doing ...


4

Last month I camped with my then-nine-month-old son. This was his second time sleeping in a tent with us, the first time he was four months old. It helps that my family, including our 7- and 9-year old daughters, have been camping in tents since they were infants. I'm not sure what the conditions in a hut are, so I'll give advise for tents which I should ...


4

I live on the edge of Dartmoor and have some hands-on experience of letterboxing. What is letterboxing? It was reportedly started by James Perrott, a Dartmoor guide who placed a bottle for visitors' cards on a cairn at Cranmere Pool in 1854. Before the modern military tracks this was the most remote point of the moor and a fashionable spot to visit. (The ...


3

This sounds like exercise induced Vasculitis. This is tiny blood vessels which break due to heat & restriction due to socks & friction. Also known as a golfers rash. It tends to happen more in people over 50. It has nothing to do with being overweight either as someone commented on the web. Mine was as a result of hiking a minimum of 25km per ...


3

When talking about boots, what you absolutely have to be careful about are those that have too much room on the "backside" (i.e., heel, ankle, midfoot). That leads to your feet slipping around each step and can give you very bad blisters plus blue toenails when you hit the front. In this case, it can be worthwhile to try shoes that seem small(ish) for your ...


3

I have a couple of buffs - one is made of polartec with a piece of thin fabric attached, and another one is just the same thin fabric. I've found the first one to be very useful in winter because: it is very easy to put on and off; on a hike you can put it off for while you're moving and take on for a stop; this also comes very handy on climbing routes ...


3

I would highly recommend a menstrual cup. That's what I use while camping and hiking as they're light easy to carry and generate little-to-no trash. You can simply pour out and bury the blood rather than packing out a load of dirty tampons. However keep in mind that there is a learning curve associated with each type of cup, and there are a LOT of ...


2

As others suggest, it's almost certainly best to go with a backpack style kid-carrier. One option you might not know about is the Aarn Universal Balance Bag which attaches to your pack. http://www.aarnpacks.com/#!balance-bags/c1paj The balance bag counterbalances the awkward weight of a kid on your back, and gives you easy access to water, maps, hats etc ...


2

I'll be brief. 100 grams of sugar and 900g of water when mixed still 100g of sugar plus 900g of water, not a miracle of 100g sugar and 1000g water concoction. Mass preserving law, considering almost no nuclear or chemical reaction inside your Cola (I'm not so sure about this hell mixture). So, if you want fast calories at hike, take carbohydrates as the ...


2

The primary advantage of the buff (an continuous loop of fabric) is the versatility (and fashion ability) of the item over a standard scarf or hat. Features In addition to the wearable methods it can also be used as Eye Mask Facecloth Microtowel Face mask when travelling, snowboarding, desert etc Self-securing bandage/pressure pad All of which can be ...


2

I use Buffs a lot. If you are out on the water fishing, a buff worn like a bandit mask combined with a big hat will save you a sunburn. I wear a one as a headscarf during long hikes. It keeps the sweat out of my eyes and I soak it in organic bug repellent to keep the gnats away. For winter hikes, I again use as a bandit mask to keep my face warm and prevent ...


2

I've had this issue too - my feet are small but wide and I often have too much length in order to get the width. The main downside I've found is that I initially tend to trip or stub my toes on difficult ground, because I'm used to something shorter I guess. After an hour or two the mind seems to adjust, but just be alert at the start in case you end up ...


1

The first option that comes to mind is a 20 ounce plastic soda bottle or something similar. Lightweight and well sealed, if you fill it only half full it's relatively easy to pour without spilling down the sides. There's also a product called the flexible flask that comes with a measuring spout that should prevent any spills, and then you could throw the ...


1

You can browse the 1:50,000 Topographic Map of New Zealand here: https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/767-nz-topo50-maps/ You can download it too but: a) you need to register with a valid email address and create a password b) the whole thing is about 10GB and you can only download 2GB at at time Just set a crop around the area you're interested in and you ...


1

I like to eat Knorr Spaghetteria. I don't know if it's the most efficient energy-wise, but it's vastly more efficient than outdoor store dehydrated meals price-wise! At Amazon they sell at €1.45 per package. A package is advertised to be a meal for two, but it isn't — it is a meal for one. But €1.45 per meal is not bad at all. I used to bring peanut ...



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