Hot answers tagged

12

I'm going to give some things to look for, but none of these are definite giveaways. It is very unlikely you will be able to tell a barely used human made trail from a game trail. Hikers like to be very obvious about the trails they make, and established trails are well worn. If a trail is very narrow, has undisturbed or barely disturbed ground cover, and ...


11

Drinking alcohol in a blizzard with potential for whiteout conditions is reckless, irresponsible, and possibly dangerous. Alcohol causes your blood vessels to dilate, which leads to an increased rate of heat loss. A much better source of quick energy would be a food with simple carbohydrates.


11

Of course, there are many long-distance hiking trails without any available maps. As far as I'm aware, none of the European long-distance trails have dedicated end-to-end maps, unless you count Openstreetmap or a collection of several hundred topographic maps. In some places they're well-mapped, e.g. when passing through Switzerland, Germany, or France, ...


10

Caveat: Heading out into a blizzard seems an easy way to get killed. Personally I'd only do it in dire situations. Regarding your layers: Cotton stores about 27x it's weight in water. This makes it comfortable indoors or in hot weather, but it also means it will act like a swamp cooler once you're no longer throwing off enough heat to keep it warm. ...


9

It depends on your destination. In general I would think of: Preparation organise one or more detailed map(s) of the area to go to check the weather forecast check public transport and buy tickets in case you do not start walking at your door make sure, you have appropriate clothes, shoes and backpack (and everything else, you want to take with you) pack ...


6

The Kungsleden (lit. kings way in Swedish) is a 440 km long trail in northern Sweden/Scandinavia. From Wiki: The trail is separated in four portions which each represent approximately one week of hiking. The most practiced part is by far the northernmost, between Abisko and Kebnekaise. The season, when the huts are open usually runs between ...


6

The biggest giveaway is that you can't follow them for very long before you encounter an obstacle. Usually it's branches hanging over the trail that you have to duck very low to get under. The trails will also often mysteriously disappear, and then miraculously reappear later on. Animal droppings and hoof/paw prints are also a dead giveaway. There isn't ...


6

Traditionally a bear bag was simply something to hold your food out of reach of bears. This usually meant finding a way to suspend it from a high branch, and in this instance it's usually sufficient for the bag to be waterproof. (With this in mind, some people like to hang the bags "upside down" to prevent rain getting in through the top. Be sure to tie ...


5

If your reason for not wanting camo is that you want to be obvious (maybe to other hunters so you don't get shot) then you can always flash a backpack with reflective material, or use a hi vis pack cover such as those recommended for cyclists. Home-modding a rucksack to incorporate the barrel ties and stock pocket probably wouldn't take you too long if you ...


5

I'm not sure how well this meets all your somewhat conflicting criteria, but take a look at Mt Taylor northeast of Grants. Grants is right on the interstate, and its not that far into the national forest to get to a trailhead. The top is about 11,300 feet. While there are some trees right at the top, there are also good open vistas. I'm not so sure about ...


5

Some good answers here, but so far no-one has mentioned perhaps the single most important safety-factor: Understand the reality of the hazards you are facing, and be sure you have the skills to cope with them Depending on the area and the season, the risk factors you should be considering might include: Weather: How challenging can it get? Do you ...


5

As well as checking the weather forecast you should research the general weather conditions for the area you will be visiting, often conditions in hilly or mountainous areas can change quickly and without warning so you should be prepared for the worst possible conditions you might encounter. This also includes checking sunset times for the time of year. ...


4

There are two types of bear bags. The first is similar to a bear canister but made out of strong cloth (often kevlar) and wire mesh with a metal insert to prevent crushing. The brand I am most familiar with is URSack, although there are probably others of equal quality. These bear bags are slightly lighter than bear canisters (and easier to pack), and pass ...


4

I live in New Mexico, and have done lots of hiking all over the state. Several things first. (1) In the northern part of New Mexico (anything north or, say, Socorro, the Forest Service campgrounds will be closed November 1st until April 1st. (2) If not closed, you will generally have to supply your own water. OK - options for you. First, instead of the ...


3

There are many good answers here, there are also several warnings about the advisability of your journey. One of the more important things to take (that seems to have been overlooked) is your ID, drivers license, dog tags (if you were in the military). As a consideration for others it is important to make it easier for them to identify your body if/when it ...


3

I agree that the sources on the internet for the GRs (grandes randonnées, the main long-distance trails in France) are a bit old-fashioned, and not ideal for finding routes. However here are some pointers to get you started -- I've linked to pages that might help you but the parent websites are worth a browse. In general French websites assume some ...


3

I've found some! I've searched a little bit and stumbled over a few. For example the "Halti Kauris": One is even able to remove the "rifle holder" and use it as a completely common backpack. Or the "Wisport Forester": Also I came across these beauties: But as wonderful as they are, they are expensive and the backpacks quite small.


3

No. They can be on the vast majority of each trail, but in most cases the land agencies along the way still have their own rules, and many National Parks (and some state parks) forbid pets on trails. You would have to either bypass those areas or arrange for your pet to be transported to the other end of each.


3

If I know that I am going to be trekking over the weekend, does it help if say from Thursday, I start drinking more water than I usually do? This clicks my mind because I spend the whole day in air-conditioned office, so, naturally and unfortunately I drink less water than I am supposed to. Others have already (correctly) told you that we cannot ...


3

Response for the question #1: I grew up in an area filled with Prairie Rattlesnakes and in grade school we were taught the following. It always worked for me and during summer vacation it was common to come across a rattler every day. Before reading the steps please be warned that the Prairie Rattlesnake is known to be less aggressive and wants to flee ...


2

You are experiencing a strain of the LCL, the Lateral Collateral Ligament that connects your femur to your fibula with IT Band syndrome. The mechanics of going downhill when hiking are significantly different than up. When taking a step down from a height of more than 6 inches, the femur tends to stay perpendicular to the ground, under the hip joint while ...


2

Greetings fellow canadian. I too have had to ensure my toes stay dry while snowshoeing to work or hunting polar bears in the hinterlands of toronto. you mentioned goretex liners. If thats the case, and you bought them through a real outlet, not a vintage store/ebay/whatever. contact goretex directly and theyll set it right. seriously. Otherwise there are 2 ...


2

tl;dr: concrete advice under the horizontal line Agreeing with the other answers, alcohol is best left for later because it can disorientate you. And among strength, endurance, body type, environment awareness, wisdom - the last is by far the most important when surviving. A month ago I was the closest in my life to calling Mountain Rescue (thanks god, ...


2

NSTs do not have a uniform set of rules. That said for the major trails, there are good websites that can answer many of your questions. The ATC website says that dogs are NOT allowed in 3 areas: Baxter State Park in Maine, Great Smoky mountains National Park in Tennessee, and Bear Mountain State Park in New York. There is an alternate road walk for the ...


2

A bear bag is a bag (in my case a stuff sack) that is "bear proof" (aka the bear can't get to it). On the AT you will only run into black bears, and they are little tree climbers. Technically speaking this should be 10 ft off the ground and 4 ft from the trunk of a tree. I've definitely gotten lazy and not followed these directions - but thats the ...


1

I've never been to RMNP in the winter, so this is a wild guess. I'm assuming the higher elevation roads will all be closed. Look into how far you can drive up Fall River Road. If I remember right, it's about 10 miles long. The eastern 3/4 or so goes up a valley. While there is certainly elevation gain, it doesn't sound like what you are looking for. ...


1

When they are tight enough to prevent movement within the shoe/boot but not so tight that it causes discomfort. A little too loose is actually worse than a lot too loose. A little too loose will guarantee a blister, while a lot too loose will reduce your ankle support.


1

Again, how tight is too tight? Probably something that doesn't come off while walking in tall grass, but does come off quick when you want it to, also fast to tie up again is the knot you are looking for. I usually prefer Ian's Secure knot. Such a brilliant link! There is a pair of shoes which have a slightly longer laces which I deliberately didnt ...


1

Besides the already given answers there is another pretty simple solution to your problem. Sometimes when I'm 3D shooting in the forest I - of course - want to hear the sound of nature. Also, I want to be able to hear other archers for safety reasons. That, however, doesn't prevent me from listening to silent background music! How, you ask? Bone ...


1

Mink oil or Sno seal are two brands I've had good results with. Preheating the boots with a hair dryer to open the pores is essential for either product.Hit the seams and inside bends first then just rub in a good coating all over and wait for it to soak in. Repeat if required.



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